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Volume 17 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille end Talking Book Publications 

January, 1948 



Number 1 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 Test 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U» S« Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing iffouse for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy Armistead Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



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Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 

List of Free Magazines in Braille or in Moon Type 

Catalog of the Students' Library in the American 
Printing House Now Available 

Announcement of Third Annual Braille Music Contest 

List of Libraries Giving Territory Served By Each 

Review of "The River" by Rumer Goddeni From the 
"New York Sunday Times" 

Hand-copied Books 



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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, January, 1948 

Book Announcements 
Press-made Books 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Government. 

Copies of these government-supplied books are placed in t he twenty-six regional 

libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in the 

January and June numbers of the magazine. 

Readers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of 

Congress to serve their respective territories* 

In the list which follows, the first book notation in every instance should be 

credited to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given. 

Banning, Margaret C. The clever sister. 4v 1946, 1947 APH 
Nell and Hester Evans were brought up in genteel poverty in a thriving midwestern city. 
Hester made a career of herself and marriage. When she drove her first husband to 
financial ruin and suicide, she marshalled her forces end found herself a wealthier 
man. Nell was the career girl, who held a fine job, got into politics, and in the 
end, had to admit that she wanted a husband, too. 

Cooper, Louise F, Summer stranger. 3v 1947 APH 
Picture of life in an exclusive summer colony on Long sla nd Sound, as viewed through 
the eyes of an unsophisticated young girl who goes to spend the summer with wealthy 
relatives. 

Ford, Leslie, pseudonym. The woman in black. 3v 1947 APH Detective story 

Godden, Rumer. The river* lv 1946 HMP 
Brief, quiet story of the lives of two adolescent girls, the daughters of an Anglo- 
Indian family, living in Bengal o The death of their young brother, due to the bite 
of a snake which he was trying to charm, is the central episode. 

Lockridge, Richard and. Frances* Think of deathi 3v 1947 APH Detective story 

Loti, Pierre, pseudonym-, An Iceland fisherman., 2v 1886 APH 
The most popular and poetic novel of this original French writer • It is the story of 
the hardships and dangers of his own Breton fisherfolk in their perilous life onthe 
northern seas. 

Marquand, John P. B. F. : s dpughter. 5v 1946 APH 
Character study of the beautiful daughter of a very wealthy industrialist, known to 
his friends as B. F. All her early life was dominated by B . F., so when Folly married 
a young professor, she started running his life for him That time, it did not work. 
The war gave hs r husband an excuse +,-> make a getaway, and Polly, failing to capture 
the man she really wanted, was adrift. 

Samuel, Maurice. Web of Lucifer, a novel of the Borgia fury. 7v 1946 AFH 
A tale of Renaissance Italy. Giacomo Orso, a young peasant lad, vows vengeance on the 
unknown murderers of his young brother. Through the years, following the trail, he 
serves under Duke Cesare, hoping to find justioe and peace in a united Italy, but in 
the end, he learns the truth and sees Cesare for what he is. 

Wharton, Edith. The old maid, lv 1924 CPH 
The scene is New York City, and the action continues through five episodes from the 
1830's to the 1850's, reflecting the social manners end conventions of the period. 

Wilde, Oscar. The picture of Dorian Gray, with introduction by Frances WLnwpr. 
3v 1946 edition. First published in 1906 APH 

Both Dorian and the epigrammatic Lord H enr y pursue sensuous and intellectual delight 
with no acceptance of moral responsibility. The artificial and melodramatic plot is 
unintentionally a severe commentary on Wilde's own pagan theory of life. The work 
abounds in highly colored imagery, taken over from the esthetics of Huysmans, G^utier, 
Baudelaire, and others * 



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Press-made Books not Published by the U. S. Government 

The books listed below are not publications of the U. S. Government, end mey, or may 
not, be available from any of the regional libraries. If not too costly, librnrions, 
in some instances, may purchase such books if there is any demand from rerders. 

Burch, Gladys, and J* Wolcott* Famous composers for young people. 2v 1945 ?PH 
For Perkins Price i $3.00 

Davis, Harold T. College algebra, with revisions and additional problems. 9v 
1940, 1942 APH For N 9 w York Institute and Perkins Price i $15.75 

Prayers for older children. Pamphlet Grade l]=r APH For John Hilton Society 

Prayers for younger children. Pamphlet Grade lg- APH For John Milton Society 

Spanish Text « Gastambide. Vega and edro P. Francisco y Arata. Isle de Puerto 
Rico, 4v Spanish 1941 APH For Puerto Rican School Price t $7.00 
) Spanish Textj Pittaro, J. M., and A. Green. Modern Spanish grammar. 8v 1931 

APH For New York Institute Price j #14.00 

Theckston, J. A., and J. F. Human health, 4v 1931, 1936 APH For Texas 
Colored School Price j $8.00 

t t . S. Individual income tax return for calendar year 1947, Form 1040, with in- 
struction booklet. 2 pamphlets 1947 £PH Prioe^ 60^ 

Talking Books 
(These books are provided by the IT. S. Government unless otherwise indicated) 

Seton, Anya. The turquoise. 2 pts 28r 1946 Read by Ann Tyrrell AFB 
The story of gifted and fascinating Santa Fe Cemeron, daughter of mixed Scotch pnd 
Soanish parentage, from whom she inherited s heightened perceptivity amounting to 
second sight. Beginning in the poor Mexican quarter of ante Fe, in 1850, the circle 
of Fey's life traverses the slums of New *ork, passes through the portals of the first 
/American hospital staffed by women physicians, lingers emid the opulence of New York's 
gilt and gaslit society, knows the interior of the Tombs, and completes itself at last 
in the shadow of the sacred Atalaya Mountain. It makes a story replete with prssion, 
romanoe and drama, authenticated by c wealth of period detail* (.Available in braille) 

1! Vhite, Stewart E. The long rifle. 2pts 35r 1932 Read by Williem L ^z*r AF^ 
The prologue to this long historical novel tells how young Daniel Boone won the first 
long rifle at a shooting match in vrestera Pennsylvania. The story itself relates to 
the adventures of Andy Burnett, grandson of Boone's friend, Goil Burnett. Andy in- 
herits Boone's long rifle, and, true to his clan and period, moves further to the 
westward to join the ranks of the ''mountain men" who trapped and explored the Rockies 
in the 1820 r s, is captured by Blackfeet Indians, and is adopted into their tribe. 
(Available in braille) 



LIST OF FREE MAGAZINES IN BRA ILIA 

All Story Magazine, with legislative supplement; edited by ^ritland L. Bishop, 
Fiction Editor and ^r. * T ewel Perry, Legislation Editor. Published by the American 
Brotherhood for the Blind, 257 South Spring St., Los ^ngeles 12, Calif. Grade 2; 
monthly; contains fiction t^ken from current magazines ^nd legislative matter pertain- 
ing to the blind with editorial comment. 

American ^egion Magazine i Edited by James F. Barton. Published by the American 
Legion. Embossed by Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, Mb. H e r>lthy, Ohio. 
Grade 1©-; monthly; for blinded veterans. 



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D. D. Rees. Published by the Christian Record 
;h 48 St*, Lincoln, Neb. G rade lg- and New ork 



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Bible Expositor* Edited by 
Benevolent Association, 3705 South 
monthly? discussion of Bible topic*. 

Braille Book Review: Edited by Lucy Armistead Goldthwaite. Published by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West 16 Street,. New York 11, N. Y. Grade 2; 
monthly except August; a guide to braille and Tnlking Book publications. 

Braille Musician! ^dited by Leopold Duboy. Published by the Jewish Braille 

Institute of America, 1846 Harrison Ave., ^ew *ork 53, N. Y. Grade 2; monthly; 

articles of interest to blind musicians end music students. 

Braille Radio News i Edited by Anne M. Costello. Published by Clovernnok 

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Printing House for the Blind, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. Grode 1-g"; monthly; radio nrogrercs 

end radio news. 

Braille Star Theosophist i Published by the Theosophical Book Association for the 
Blind, 184 South Oxford Avenue , Los Angeles 4, Calif. Grode 2 

Calendar: Motto calendar, edited by Milton V. Stauffer, 156 Fifth ^venue , New 
) York 10, N.Y. Grade lg-; annual; reproduction of a religious calender compiled and 
printed by a Quaker family of Philadelphia* Sent free to readers of the John Milton 
Magazine • 

Catholic Digest j Edited by Father Edward F. Jennings, published by Catholic 
Digest, 55 East 10 St., St. Paul, Minn. Grade 1-jjr; monthly; summery of articles of 
general interest. 

Catholic Review of the Blind* Edited by William S. Dolen. Published by Xavier 
Free Publication Society for the Blind, 136 West 97 Street, New York, N.Y. Grade l|rj 
quarterly; a religious magazine. 

Children r s Friendj Edited by D. D. Rees. Published by Christian Record Benevo- 
lent Association, 5705 South 48 St., Lincoln, Neb. Grade 1-g-; monthly;^ magazine for 
children. 

Christian Record: Edited by D. D. Rees. Published by the Christian Record 
Benevolent Association, 3705 South 48 St., Lincoln, Neb» Grade 1-g-j and Now York 
point* monthly; religious articles and topics of general interest. 

Christian Record Sabbath School Monthly: Edited by D. D. Rees. Published by 
) Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 S uth 48 St., Lincoln, Neb, Gr^de lg- 
and New York point; a religious magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

Church H erald for the Blind: Edited by Rev. W. J. Looring-Clnrk. Published by 
National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 281 Fourth Ave., New York, ^ . Y. 
Grade lg-; monthly; a religious magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

Discovery? Edited by Margaret T. Applegarth* published by John Milton Society, 
156 Fifth -*ve., New York 10, N.Y. Grade lg-; monthly, Sept. - May; a religious 
juvenile magazine with Surday School lessons 

The Evangelj Edited by Kathryn LaSor. 
Blind, 300 South Gremps St., Pew Paw, Mich. 
missionary news. 

Forward D y by Day: Edited by The Rev. Gilbert P. Symons, 412 Sycamore St., 
Cincinnati 2, Ohio. Grade lg-; bi-monthly; a religious magazine. 

Full Gospel Monthly: Edited by Grace Allen. Published 
Company for the Blind, 431 Delaney St., Orlando, Fie. Grade 
magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

Home Teacher i Edited by Rowena Morse. Published by National Braille Press, SSSt 
Stephens St., Boston 15, Mass. Grade 2; monthly; professional magazine for home 
teachers and social workers. 

International Lions Juvenile Braille Monthly} Edited by Marcellus Wagner. Pub- 
lished by International Lions Club. Embossed by Clovernook Printing House for the 
Blind, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. Grade Lg; monthly; a magnzine for children. 



Published by Hope Printing Co. for the 
Grade 2; monthly; religious articles, 



by Full Gospel Publishing 
lg-; monthly; a religious 



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Jewish Braille Reviewi Edited by Leopold Dubov. Published by Jewish Braille 
Institute of America, 1846 Horrison Ave,, New York 53, N.Y. Gredo 2; monthly; 
articles of interest to Jewish readers. 

John Milton Magazine: Edited by William T. Stauffer, Published by John Milton 
Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, Few York 10, N. Y. Grade l|j-; monthly; a religious 
magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

Junior Evangel I Edited by Kathryn LaSor. Published by Hope Printing Co. for the 
Blind, 300 South Gremps St., Paw Paw, Mich. Grade lg-; monthly during school year; 
Junior Sunday School lessons, Christian stories, poems, etc. 

The Lamp i Edited by Florence Clepsaddle. Published by Christian Association for 
the Blind, 430 East 141 St., New York 54, F. Y. Gredo ].•§■; bi -monthly; a religious 
magazine. 

Lighthouse Gleams i Edited by Daisy F. Rogers. Published by New York Association 
for the Blind, 111 East 59 St., New York 22, N. Y. Grade lg-; five times a yeerj news 
of the activities of the Lighthouse* 

Lutheran Messenger for the Blindi ^ditod by Rev. O.C. Schroeder, 1648 East 85 
St., Chicago, 111. Published by Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod. Grade 1-g-; monthly 
except August; a religioras magazine. 

Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blindi Edited by H. M* Liechty. Published by 
Matilda Ziegler Publishing Company for the Blind, Monsey, N. y. Grade lg-, with 
additional contractions, New York point and Moon; monthly; a general magazine with 
special features for the blind. 

Messenger to the Sightless t Edited by Albert W. Telmadge and Sfdie Pattan. 
Published by the Society for the Aid of the Sightless, 345 East Fourth North St., 
Provo, Utah. Grade lg-j monthly; a religious magazine* 

Minnasotani Edited by Marie Koehler. Published by Minnesota State Council of 
Agencies for the Blind, 2835 Nicollet -^ve., Minneapolis, Minn. Grade 2j monthly; 
matters of interest to the blind of Minnesota. 

Our Specialj Edited by Florence TT. Birchard. Published by National Braille 
Press, 88 St. Stephen St., Boston 15, Mass. Grado lg-; monthly; articles on home 
occupations, otc, intended especially for women. 

The Searchlight i Edited by Helen Day* Published by the New York Association for 
the Blind, 111 East 59 St., New York 22, N. Y. Grade lg-; ten times a year; a juvenile 
magazine. 

The Seen Edited by Philip N. Harrison, 
for the Blind, 400 North 3 St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
official organ for the Association. 

Unity Daily Wordj Published by Unity Sohool of Christianity, 917 Tracy Ave., 
Kansas City, Mo. Grade lg-; monthly; a religious magazine. 

Upper Roomi Edited by Grover C. Emmons* Published by Methodist Church, Nash* 
Ville, Tenn* Grade lg-; quarterly; daily devotions. 

We the Blindi Edited by M. David Treatman. Published by Pennsylvania Federation 
of the Blind, 136 So. 46 St., Philadelphia, Pa. Grade 2 and inkprint; quarterly; 
current topics of interest to the blind. 

Wee Wisdomt Edited by Jane Palmer. Published by Unity School of Christianity, 
917 Tracy Ave., Kansas City, Mo. Grade ljfj monthly; a magazine for children. 

Weekly Newsi Edited by Francis B. Ierardi. Published by National Braille Press, 
88 St, Stephen St,, Boston 15, Mass. Grade 2; weekly; current news. 



Published by Pennsylvania Association 
Grade lg- and inkprint; quarterly; 



FREE MAGAZINES IN MOON 

Lutheran Herald for the Blindi Edited by Rev. O.C. Schroeder. Published by 
Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod, 1648 East 85 St., Chicago, 111. Quarterly; a religious 
magazine. 

Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blindj Edited by F.M. Liechty. Published by 
Matilda Ziegler Publishing Co. for the Blind,M.onsey, F.Y. Also in braille and New York 
point; monthly; a general magazine with special features for the blind* 






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Inkprint Catalog of Students' Library in the American Printing 

House Now Available 

As students throughout the country are permitted to borrow books from the 
American Printing House Students' Library, we know this catalog will be of interest 
to many readers of the "Braille Book Review." This is e special collection, as it3 
name implies, including some 300 titles, many of them not to be found elsewhere. 

Such titles as the "Medical Dictionary," "Terracing for Soil and Water Conserva- 
tion," "Care of the Feet," "The Wholesome Personality," give some indication of the 
variety of subjects covered. 

The catalog is in inkprint. It will be sent free upon request. Address i 
American Printing House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Ave*, Louisville 6, Kentucky. 



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A^OTWCEME'WT °F THIRD ANNUAL BRAILLE TrTT SlC CONTEST 

The Braille Fusical Club, of Chicago, is happy to announce its third annuel 
National Composition Contest. This contest will be divided into two sections j 

1. Original composition for piano soloj First prize, ^25; second prize, &15; 
third prize, *10. 

2. Original composition for vocel solo with piano accompaniment j First prize, 
$25.; second prize, $15* third prize, $10. 

All blind composers of the United States are eligible and may enter either or 
both sections of the contest, but no published compositions are acceptable. All 
entries must be in by the closing date, April 1, 1948. Entries may be submitted either 
in braille or inkprint, but inkprint is preferable. Braille entries should be sent 
in as much before April 1 as possible, in order to give our transcriber emple time to 
make inkprint copies before that date. 

The name and address of the composer should not appear on the composition, but 
should be written clearly on a slip of paper, together with the title of the composi- 
tion, and enclosed in a sealed envelope. 

For further particulars, write to the contest chairman j L^ura E. /nderson, 9322 
South Winchester Ave., Chicago 20, 111., or telephone her at Beverly 2313. 



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LIST OF LIBRARIES GIVING TERRITORY SERVED BY E> CH 



Albany 

Atlanta 

Austin 
Canada 

Chicago 

) Cincinnati 

Cleveland 
fenver 
Detroit 
Faribault 

Honolulu 

Indianapolis 

Jacksonville 



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JBL 

LC 

Los Angeles 
Wew Orleans 
>T . Y. Guild 

NYPL 
Oklahoma 



New York State Libraryt New York State other then Grepter "aw 
York City and Long Island; Vermont 

Kriegshaber Memorial Library for the Blind: Georgia; Alabama; 
Florida 

Texas State Library* Texas 

Canadian National Institute Library, 64 Baldwin Street, 
Toronto* Canada 

Chicago Public Library, 4536-44 Lincoln Avenue j Illinois 
north of Springfield; Wisconsin 

Cincinnati Library Society for the Blind, 6990 Hamilton Avenue 
Mt . Healthyi Ohio south of Columbus; Kentucky; Tennessee 

Cleveland Public Library i Northern half of Ohio, including 

Columbus 

Denver Public Libraryt Colorado; New Mexico; Nebraska 

Wayne County Library, 3661 Trumbull Avenue t Wayne County; Mich. 

M.innesota Braille and Sight-Saving School, Library for the 
Blind: Minnesota; North Dakota; South Dakota 

Library of Hawaii i Hawaiian Islands 

Indiana State library j Indiana 

Illinois Free Circulating Library for the Blind, Illinois 
School for the Blind* Southern hr, If of Illinois including 
Springfield; Iowa 

Jewish Braille Library, 1846 Harrison Avenue, New Ycr^ 53, 
v . Y.* Nation-wide service 

Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.i District of Columbia; 
Maryland; North and South Carolina; Virginia 

Los Angeles Lending Libraryt California; Arizona 

New Orleans Public Libraryt Louisiana; Mississippi 

New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, 1880 Broadway, M ew York, 
TT . Y. Nation-wide service 

,T ew York Public Library, 137 West 25 Street, ? T ew York 1, >T .Y.t 
Greater New York City and Long Island; Connecticut; Fuerto 
Rico; Virgin Islands 

Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City: Oklahoma ,Ark-nsas 



Perkins 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 
Portland 

Sacramento 
Saginaw 

Salt Lake ^ity 
Seattle 

St. Louis 



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Perkins Institution Library, Wrtortown 72, Mass.i For Talking 
Book Service, Massachusetts; New Hampshire j Maine; Rhode Hand, 
For embossed books, all of New England 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Logan Square, Philadelphia 3i 
Eastern half of Pennsylvania including Barrisburg; 
New Jersey; Delaware 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh} Pennsylvania west of 
prarrisburg; West Virginia 

Library of Association of Portland, 801 West Tenth Avenue i 
Oregon; Idaho 

California State Library: California; Nevada 

Michigan State Library for the Blindi All of Michigan outside 
of Wayne County 

Salt Lake City Public Library j Utah; Wyoming 

Seattle Public Library, Seattle 4| Washington; Montana; 
Alaska 

"enry L. Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 3844 Olive 
Street j Missouri; Kansas 



Students' Library APH American "rinting House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Avenue, 

Louisville 6, Ky»j Students in all states 



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AFB 

APH 
ARC 
n IA 

CPH 
FMP 
> T IB 

TBA 



LIST OF O^HER ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS MAGAZINE 

American Foundation for the Blind, 15 West 16 Street, 
New York 11, F. Y. 

American Printing House for the Blind 

American Red Cross, National Headquarters, Washington, D. C 

Braille Institute of America, 741 North Vermont Avenue, 
Los Angeles, Calif* 

Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, Mt . Healthy, Ohio 

Howe Memorial Press, 549 East Fourth Street, Voston 25, ''rss, 

National Institute for the Blind, 224 Great Portland Street, 
London, W. 1, England 

Theosophical Book Association for the Blind, 184 South Oxford 
Avenue, Los Angeles, California 






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TFE RIVER * by Rumer Godden 
A Review by John ""foodburn from the "> T ew York Sunday Times" 

The English language is so often the sad captive of bed masters that to see it 
become fresh and evocative in the hands of a conscious and responsible artist such as 
Rumer Godden is to experience an exhilarating shock of recognition. Under a sort of 
alchemy which she practices, the simple, daily words seem to show forgotten facets, to 
take on a kind of shine, as though she deliberately set them out, like prisms, where 
they will best catch the light, 

This is the sort of writing which gave such distinction to "Black Narcissus" and 
"Take Three Tenses," the only two previous books of here I have reed, which make them 
still so pungent in my memory* I am pleased to report that she has continued her 
sorcery in this new novel, "The River," and that here may be found the seme bright 
surfaces and profound depths, the pure iesign, the prose which is at once limpid and 
aromatic, the same refusal to send so much as a phrase on a fool's errand. It is a 
short book, brief without abruptness, but it covers all points of the emotional com- 
pass and is, in my opinion, as good in its way as any work which she has done* 
) Inasmuch as ff The River" presents an uncontrived calendar of experience, rather 

than plot, the effect is one of spontaneous design* It would be better still to sey 
that the story has a course, like that of the river whioh flowed by the house where 
Harriet lived in Bengal; the river whose insistent sounds, with the puff -wait -puff of 
the jute-pressing mill, punctuated the silences of that brief Indian winter. For the 
movement of Miss Godden r s novel is riparian and inexorable, as inevitable as the pass- 
age of time, in this case, which stole Harriet's childhood. All children come to know 
this aching period of transition* It is the time when the bright enclosing world 
which we never doubted would last forever suddenly vanishes, and we hear a door clos- 
ing upon childhood* And Rumer Godden has made it so poignant in this novel that I 
cannot think at the moment of a contemporary writer who has remembered it better or 
expressed it so well* 

For Harriet that winter was a season of forced and bruising growth. .Above her 
and below her were those she loved and whom she could not reach. She might still race 
about the garden with her younger brother Bogey, but it wasn't the same* Bee, who was 
older, was moving away from her, maddeningly, into the supercilious realm of young 
S womanhood. And Captain John, a young man grown quickly old in a war, and whom Harriet 
loved passionately and hopelessly, seemed to have eyes only for Bea» Nan, the Anglo- 
Indian servant, indigenous and wise, stated it: "if I were you," said Nan, "I should 
keep to playing with Bogey," "I am too big too play with Bogey," said H**riet angrily. 
"You are too small for Captain John," said Nan. Against such things Harriot used the 
devices of a lonely childt there was the cork tree which stood in the garden, and with 
which she felt a strange affinity? there was the place at the end of the jetty where 
she could feel that she was a oart of the river j and the alcove under the stair where 
she kept the notebooks in which she wrote her secret thoughts and the urgent poems 
which seemed to unfold like flowers in her head and which, she w*is certain, would some 
day make her famous. But even these things were no charm against the wounds of that 
season, the winter when her world fell to pieces and a new, strange world took its 
place, bringing the realities of death and birth, of cruelty and retribution, and 
finally, the beginning of acceptance which is also the beginning of wisdom* 

There is in "The River" if one cares to look for it, a khd of unobtrusive symbo- 
lism. The death of a child becomes the death of childhood. There is a serpent, a 
cobra, which will some will say is surely the Serpent in the Garden, the murderer of 
innocence. There is> Harriet 's kite flying, which may or may not be the image of dream- 
ing ambition. But these are the things to ponder after rending, for I assure you 
"The River" is so intense, so quietly demanding of attention, that at the time there 
will be nothing in your thoughts but a small girl in India, and the people end the 
place that were her world. 



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Editor's note | Among this author's books, the following are also available 



in braille i 



Blaok Narcissus 2v HMP 

Breakfast with the Nikolides 2v APH 

Gypsy, Gypsy 2v BIA 

Take Three Tenses 2v BMP 

Thus Far and Wo Further 2v LC 



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Hand-copied Books 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries* Unless other- 
wise indicated, these books ore in Grade lg. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries! Following each title in this list, you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of a city* These ere abbreviations 
for the names of libraries for the blind end indicate the librory in which you will 
find the book. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names and oddresses of ench 
librery and also of publiching houses, is included in every January nnd June issue* 



Adler, Mortimer J. Manual for discussion leaders, preliminary draft for use in 
Great Books community groups. 3v 1946 NYPL 

Brooks, Benjamin T. Peace, plenty and petroleum. 3v 1944 NYPL 
This book traces the growth of the petroleum industry, causes of the oil situation and 
national world power implications* 

Butterfield, R. Oj, editor* Al Schmid, marine. 2v 1944 Cleveland 
Personal experiences of a Marine blinded in World War II* 

Cheavens, Martha. Nor any memory* lv 1945 NY Guild 

Chen, Stephen, and Robert Payne. Sun Yat-Sen, a portrait. 4v 1946 * T YPL 
Biography of the "father of the Chinese Republic." 

Dudley, A. T. With mask and mitt* 3v 1906 Cleveland Baseball story 

Grabbe, Paul. The story of one hundred symphonic favorites. 3v 1940 NYPL 

Keyes, Francos P* Written in heaven. 3v 19*37 Cleveland St. Louis Life of 
St. Theresa, the Little Flower* 

KLitgaord, Koj* Oil and deep water. 4v 1945 LC Philadelphia 
I This book is a complete summation of what was happening to the American Merchant Marine 
under the present day labor drive. Because Klitgaard is not only a very competent 
writer, but a thoughtful, critical and honest one, this book has merning on almost 
every page for the problems of today* 

Henderson, Le Grand. Augustus and the mountains. 2v 1941 Cleveland 
Augustus and his happy-go-lucky family swap the family houseboat for a battered car 
and go to visit Ma's family in the Kentucky mountains. Augustus gets mixed up with 
some Indians from a nearby reservation with good results all around* 

Lasswell, Mary. High time. 3v 1944 St. Louis, LC, Philpdelphia 
Further adventures of three elderly beer-drinking ladies, who lived together in Mrs, 
Feeley's junkyard home, the Ark* In this book they find a variety of ways to aid the 
war effort, even though they are not acceptable in the Waves or WACS, or even en 
airplane factory* 

Lattimore, Eleanor F* Bayou boy. lv 1946 NYPL 
Louis was a little Negro boy, living near a bayou in Louisiana. In this simple stcry 
of everyday life, Louis goes swimming, oatches turtles, and watches Granny et her work 
When his father decided a house in New Orleans would be nice, the vhole family went to 
look at rhe house, except Granny. At the end of a long day, the family gave up the 
idea of New Orleans; they were glad to get beck to the bnyou and Granny. 

Lowell, Juliet. Dear sir. lv 1944 NY Guild 
A collection of letters culled from the files of draft boards, the OPA, war plants end 
government agencies, revealing some of the problems and perplexities of American 
citizens in wartime. 



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Mason, Miriam E. Young Audubon, boy naturalist. 2v 1943 Cleveland 
Story of the younger years of the artist-scientist, Audubon, written for readers 
of fourth and fifth grade age# The book stresses Audubon's passion for birds, 
beginning when he was a small boy in Nantes, France. 

Millaud, Pierre. The English way 4v Grade 3 194.6 NYPL 

Richter, Conrad. The trees. £v 194-0 LC, Chicago, N.Y. Guild, 
Philadelphia, NYPL 

Tells the story of one pioneer family who migrated from Pennsylvania to the virgin 
wilderness of southeastern Ohio, near the end of the eighteenth century. Their 
western migration and their struggles have a genuine epic import, for their story 
is the story of the western settlement, 

Sutherland, Edwin H* Principles of criminology. lOv 1939 N.Y. Guild 



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Volume 15 



PRAILLE BOOF REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

February, 1946 



"unite r 2 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and in Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Street 
New York 11, N. Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the TT. S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1R39 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy -A. Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Street 
* T ew York 11, T T . Y. 



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Contents 



Fook Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 
Fand-copied Books 

lh Velly" and "The Reader's Digest" 
(Concluded) Taken in part from 
"The New Yorker," December 8 and 
15th, 1945 



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Advance "Invitation to Learning" 
Schedule 



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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, February, 1946 

Book Announcements 
Press-made Books 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Government. 

Copies of these government-supplied books are placed in the twenty-seven regional 

libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in the 

January and June numbers of this magazine. 

Readers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of 

Congress to serve their respective territories. 

In the list inhich follows, the first book notation in every instance should be 

credited to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given. 

Chapman, Paul W. Occupational guidance. 6v 1937 APF (Not a publication of 
the TT.S. Government) 

The author is well known as an educator and author of many volumes dealing with 
vocational guidance and agriculture. 

Daly, Maureen. Smarter and smoother i a handbook on how to be that way. 2v 
1944 APF (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Matters of general personal grooming, manners and social customs, set forther in 
language designed to apoeal to the junior high school girl. 

Dickinson, G. Lowes. A modern symposium, lv 1905 BIA 
Members of a fictitious group present their individual philosophies, representing 
the liberal, socialist, anarchist, business man, Quaker, etc. 

Fisher, Anne B. The Salinas: upside-down river. 3v 1945 CPF 
Discription and history of the Salinas river, which flows through the valley between 
Monterey and Los Angeles. The account begins in 1769 when the first Catholic 
missionaries came up from Mexico, and brings the history down to 1930 with "Major 
Dwight D. Eisenhower reports." 

Duncan, Kunigunde, and D. F. Nickols. Mentor Grahamt the man who taught 
Lancoln. 4v 1944 CPF 

"This important addition to Lincolniana is the heretofore untold story of the scarce- 
ly known schoolmaster who had so decisive an influence in shaping and directing 
Lincoln's career. The "Biography" skillfullv preserves the Midwest idiom end atmos- 
phere of the period and region which was for Graham and Lincoln the same Kentucky- 
Illinois milieu, Brush Creek and New Salem," Commonweal 

Foley, Martha, editor, Best American short stories. 6v 1944 APF 

Forman, Farrison, Report from Red China. 3v 1945 CPH 
"The author, an American correspondent, managed to extract a safe-conduct from 
Chiang Kai-Shek to go into the Communist Shensi Province of northern China. Mr. 
Forman wanted to find out, among other things, whether certain Chunking authorities 
were right when they said that the territory was not really blockaded bv the Central 
Government and that the Red armies were not fighting the Japanese. He reports that 
the Communists (who aren't really very orthodox ones) are capturing and killing Japs 
in satisfving numbers and are cut off from all outside help, including vital 
surmlies sent by the United Nations." New Yorker 

Farkins, Philio. Pomber nilot. 2v 1944 APF (* T ot a publication of the U.S. 
Government) Picture of the training of bomber Pilots and their subsequent missions 
over Europe. Serious thinking, the excitement of battle, concern for the wounddd, 
relief of safe return make this a story for adults as well as for boys. 

Irish, William. Phantom lady 4v NIP Panda *91 (Not a publio-tion of the 
U.S. Government.) "A most intriguing and satisfying piece of mystery fiction, set jr. 
Few York, b^ a writer of polished talent." lie New geacon. 

Kitson, tj.D. and M.R. Singenfelter . Vocations for boys. 4v 1943 APF 

Kitson, F.D. and M.R. Singenfelter. Vocations for girls. 4v 1939 A rIT 
(The above titles by Kitson are not publications of the U.S. Government) 



3. 



Kneeland, N., and others. Selling to today's customer* 7v 1942 APF 
(Not a oublication of the U. S. Government) 

Lin Yutang. Vigil of a nation. 4v 1945 APF 
"""Then the author sticks to what he saw and felt he does a magnificent job of it. It 
is when Philosopher Lin leaves off writing of colors end sounds and smells and takes 
on the job of defending a hurt and misunderstood Chira, that 'The Vigil of a Nation' 
becomes, to me, regrettably disappointing. For here Dr. Lin steps into a field I 
believe to be bevond his exnerience and first-hand knowledge, particularly with 
respect to the Civil Tar between Fuomintang and the Chinese Communists." Harrison 
Forman in Saturday Review of Literature. 

M acLennan, ^ugh. Two solitudes. 5v 1945 CP* 7 
* T ovel of Canada scanning the years between two Torld Tars. It is also e study of 
the two factions whi ^h go to make ur> Canada, the English and the French-Canadian. 
Athanase Tallard, French Canadian aristocrat, and his younger son, Paul, are the 
chief exnonents of the one side; John Yardley, a retired "ova Scotian sea-caotain, 
and his young granddaughter, represent the other side. 

Marsh, Fgaio. Died in the wool. 3v 1945 APF 
Detective story. 

Oodvoke , John B. Say what you mean; everyman's guide to diction and grammar. 
llv 1944 AP TT 

This book combines chapters on the overuse of words and their underuse, their 
misuse and positive abuse, with spelling, punctuatior , pronunciation, antonyms, 
synonyms, slang, idioms, so much that its ind^x, a paragon of its kind, takes up 
thirty-eight double-column nages. Anyone interested in the study of words, in the 
whys and wherefores of correct usage, will find this not only a sound textbook, but 
an excellent reference boo'-. 

Pe°t, Creighton. All about broadcasting, lv 1942 (Not a oublication of the 
U. S. Government) A boy interested in radio is shown as he visits the studios of 
the four major networks, and learns from engineers ebout the radio waves and trans- 
mitters and what routine is like in big broadcasting stations. 

Tunis, J.R. Rookie of the year. 2v 1944 APF ( M ot a oublication of the 
F.S. Government) A thoroughly good snorts story for older boys. 

v inel, ^orold. Verse writing, lv 1945 APF ( TT ot a oublication of the 
t t. S. Government) 

Talking Books 
(These books are provided bv the IT. S. Government unless otherwise noted) 



^olgac, Fonore de . Christ in Flanders and other stories; translated bv Mrs. 
Clare Bell. 2 nts 25r Reed by Horace Brahnm AFB 

Balzac (1799-1850) is often said to be the greatest of French novelists. n e died 
at the age of fifty-one, leaving one of the most extensive bodies of work that any 
writer has ever produced » All his novels, taken together, form what he called "The 
Divine Comedy." The purpose of this gigantio undertaking was to make an inventory 
of all the vices and virtues of French society in the nineteenth century, to writ 
a history of the manners and customs of the eooch. 

Gardner, Frle Stanley. The case of the golddigger's nurse. 14r 1945 Reed 
by Burt Blackwell. A^F Detective story. 

O'Fara, Mary. Thunderhead. 2nts 25r 1943 Read by George Patterson A rv 
Sequel to "My Friend Flicka." Thunderhead is one of Flicka's colts and is a thi — - 
back to his albino grandfather. Ken cherishes an idea that his horse will one day 
make a good r8oer. But Thunderhead takes things on himself and becomes leader of a 
bVnch of wild mares. After some disillusioning erisodes, Fen takes a firm hold on 
himself and puts Thunderhead where he con no longer bring trouble to the ranch. 

Perry, Ralph Barton. The hope of immortality. 2r 1935 Rend by George Walsh 
The author is a well known professor of ohilosonhy at Harvard. 









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Simmons, Harry. Successful selling for the new day. 2pts 25r 1944 Read by 
Paul Clark AFH 

"This hook stems directly from two previously successful books by the author, 'A 
Fractical Course in Successful Selling' end 'Few Roads to Selling*' Chapters have 
been revised, pre-written, or rearranged from both these volumes." Preface 
(Available in braille) 

Wilson, Margaret. The able McLaughlins. 13r 1923 Read by Dick Crowley APH 
A- story of a Scotch community in the Middle West during the '60's. The plot is 
slight, dealing with the marriage of Wully McLaughlin, freshly returned from Grant's 
army, and Christie McFair, unfortunate victim of the town's scapegrace. The work 
is particularly successful in the deftness with which a variety of Scotch characters 
are drawn* Awarded Harper and Pulitzer prizes. 



Hand-copied Books 

This is a list of the hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unlesc 
otherwise indicated these books are in Grade Vg 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this list y:. 
will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the library in which you 
will find the book* A key to these abbreviations, giving the names and address of 
each library, and also of publishing houses, is included in every June and Januery 
issue. 



Barton, Betsey. And now to live again. 3v 1944 FYPL 
Ten years ago, when the author " r as sixteen, her b^ck was broken and her legs 
paralyzed in an automobile accident. In this book she describes her own way back to 
normal life, and gives practical hints for rehabilitation of others so afflicted. 
Her oersonal philosophy and faith, which has helped her to face life crops up 
throughout the book. 

Bout ell, Anita. Cradled in fear. 4v Chicago Fiction 

Bright, Robert. Life anddeath of little Jo. 3v Chicago 
A story of the unspoiled people of a little Hew Mexican village, of little Jc who 
grew up there, learned to play the guitar and sing, got into trouble, fell in love, 
and went off to war. 

Bromfield, Louis. What became of Anna Bolton. 5v Philadelphia 
The storv of a girl who found that fame and beauty were not enough. The war gave 
her her chance and the manner in which she met the challenge - turned back to herd 
work and privation - made her at last a real person. 

Brown, J. A. 6000 miles over the roads of free China. lv Grade 2 Sacramento 

Rulosan, Carlos. The laughter of my father. 3v Chicago 

Coblentz, C. C. The beggar's penny. 3v Chicago 

^aly, Elizabeth. The book of the dead. 4v Chicago 
The Crenshaw case oroved to be so dangerous that Henry Gamadge, bibliophile-det-. -~- 
ive narrowly escaped death himself. 

Dawson, Cleo e She came to the valley. 8v Chicago Fiction 

De Angeli, Marguerite. Skippack school; being the story of Sli Shrawder r.r.d jf 
one Christopher Dock, schoolmaster nbout the year 175P. lv Fhiladelohia 

Deming, Dorothy. Fenny Marsh finds adventure in public health nursing. 3v 
Chicago Vocational story for older girls. 

De Poncius, Gontran. Home is the hunter. 3v Chicago Fictitn 
Erskine, John, Voyage of Captain Bart. 6v Chicago Fiction 
Ewen, David. The story of George Gershwin, lv 1943 VYTL 
Popular biography of a notable American composer of jazz music, written for young 
people. 



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Fiction 

Chicago Detective story 
4v Chicago Detective story 
Chicago, Cincinnati, Salt Leke 



Finger, C. J. Give me a horse. 4v Chicago 
A lad of eighteen goes with a ship-load of horses to South America end adventures in 
that country with an Indian boy as companion. 

Frings, Ketti. God's frdnt porch. 2v Chicago 

Gardner, E. S. Case of the crooked candle. 4v 

Gardner, E. S. Case of the dangerous dowager. 

Hunt, Mi L. Little girl with seven names, lv 
City 

Maugham, Somerset. The razor's edge. 7v Chicago Fiction 
The story of a young American's quest for a faith. His eearch takes him all over the 
world and reaches its climax in India. 

Montgomery, Helen. Colonel's lady. 3v Chicago Fiction 

Moore, Grace. You're only human once. 6v Chicago 

Koser, Edwa . Wedding day. lv Chicago 

Pearson, Edmund, Murder at Smutty Nose, lv Philadelphia 

Stevenson, D. E. Miss Buncle's book. 7v Chicago, Columbus, N. Y. Guild. 
Sacramento. Story of what happened when Miss Buncle wrote a book about her home 
town and didn't disguise her characters. 

Tamas, Istvan. Sergeant Nikola j a novel of the Chetnik brigades. 5v Chicago 
Sergeant Nikola and his two brothers are 'chetniks,' guerrilla followers of General 
> T ihailovich in the mountains of Jugoslavia. This novel is the catalogue of their 
exploits as they outwit the Nazis and Blockshirts with high spirits and remarkable 
gaiety. 

The United Nations, peoples and countries; prepared by the United Nations 
Information Office in cooperation with the United States Office of Education and 
th<? various national information services. 2v Grade 2 AT YFL 

The United Nations to-day and to-morrow; prepared by the United Nations Infor- 
mation Office in cooperation with the United States Offi ce of Education and the 
various national information services, lv Grade 2 VY'L 

Van Loon, F. W« Ancient man; the beginning of civilization. 2v Philadelphia 

""Talker, Mildred* Winter wheat. 6v Chicago Fiction 
To Ellen Webb of Montana the growing of wheat was e matter of pride and deep satis- 
faction. Her love for the land helped her to understand her Russian mother, her 
New England father, and Gilbert Borden. The period is just before the second World 
War. 

Walsh, Mawice. Spanish lady. 6v Chicago 
The tale has to do with a veteran of the Spanish Civil War who seeks to restore 
his health in Scotland, falls in love there with the Spanish wife of a laird of the 
Glenn, end only win» her after murder and mystery have played a part in his wooing. 

Wright, Richard. Black boy. 6v Chicago 
"One rises from the reading of «tch a book with mixed thoughts. Richard Wright us a 
vigorous and straightf orwerd English; often there is real beauty in his words ever 
when they ere mixed with sadism. Yet at the result one is baffled. Evidently if 
this is an actual record, bad asthe world is, such concentrated meanness, filth <-nd 
despair never completely filled it or any particular part of it. But if the book is 
meant to be a creative picture and o warning, even then, it misses its possible 
effectiveness because it is as a work of art so patently and terribly overdrawn." 
W.E.B. Du Bois in Weekly Book Review 









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"WALLY" AND THE READER'S DIGEST (Continued) 
Taken in part from "The New Yorker," December 8 and 15, 1945 

Until 1935, Wallace may reasonably have wondered whether he hadn't made a mis- 
take in going into the intricate business of manufacturing articles instead of sim- 
ply reprocessing old ones. As far as anyone could tell, the customers seemed to 
like the reused goods as well as the new. He nevertheless kept offering more sample! , 
and of the forty originals he printed that year, one turned out to be a startling 
success. This was a sanguinary piece about automobile accidents called "And Sudden 
Death," written by J. C. Furnas. It turned out to be the most widely read magazine 
article ever published anywhere. Wallace got the idea when, as he was speeding 
through the oountryside near pleasantville one spring afternoon, a tire blew out, c» 
his car. At the garage where he had it repaired, he fell into conversation with en 
articulate mechanic, who recited several bloodcurdling accounts of automobile wrecks 
he had seen. Wallace was impressed* He quickly got in touch with Furnas, who was 
working in a "Digest" artiole about traffic problems, and told him to drop it end 
immediately start doing a short but vivid article that would shock the nation into 
realizing that oareful driving was essential* Bearing a title taken from the Book 
of Common Prayer, Furnas's story, full of "raw ends of bones protruding through 
flesh," "dark red, oozing surfaces," and ■ rpses, w<*s published in the August issue. 

The week the article appeared, the "Digest" sent proofs of it to five thousand 
newspapers and other publications and invited them to reprint it. Almost all did. 
In several Hearst dailies, Arthur Brisbane's column was pushed off Page 1 to make 
room for the gory treatise. Within a few weeks, it had been reprinted in whole or in 
part by newspapers, in every large American city, and in hundreds of weeklies, farm 
and religious journals, college magazines, and house organs. In addition, it was 
read or discussed on numerous radio programs, read aloud at dozens of Rotary and 
Kiwanis gatherings, syndicated in comic-strip form, and made into a movie short. 
What effect the extensive distribution of this gruesome work of art had on reckless 
driving it is hard to say with certainty, but it may be significant that in 1936, the 
year it came out, 1,720 more persons were killed in automobile accidents in this 
country than the year before, and the figure rose even higher the next year. 

Whatever the practical results of the Furnas article, the effect on Wallace was 
exhilarating. It bolstered his confidence in his editorial judgment, and Wallace 
determined to become a permanent first-guess editor* To do this overtly, he was 
pware, would bring up a perolexing publishing problem, for if the "©igest" began 
appearing with large numbers of frankly original articles, many readers might get 
the impression that their favorite periodical was no longer providing them with an 
accurate cross-seotion of the best sum and substance of the current literary output. 
Wallace solved the problem by inventing the "planted" article perhaps the most im- 
portant journalistic innovation since the invention of the digest magazine itself. 
A "Digest" "plant" is the same as a "Digest" original, with one exception. Both 
plants and originals are planned, assigned to authors, andpaid for by the "Digest." 
The original articles are published in the "Digest" without being ascribed to eny 
other magazine. Before a "plant" apneers in the "Digest" however, it is sent to son? 
other periodical j say, the "Rotarian," The "Rotarian" publishes the article. The 
"Digest" then "reprints" it, under a line saying "Condensed from The Rotarian." The 
advantages of the planting system to Wallace are obvious; it allows him to have the 
fun of being a first-guess editor and at the same time to observe the letter, if not 
the precise spirit, of what is expected of a reprint magazine. 

For some reason, Wallaoe has always been something less than garrulous about the 
extent of the "Digest's" planting activities. Feople who hav - been interested enough* 
to ask the "Digest" how much of the magazine's content is supplied by other period- 
icals and how much is originated by the "Digest" have received responses in straighi- 
from-the shouldor doublet alke However, an irrepressible statistician named George 
W. Bennett recently knocked himself out getting up some figures and arrived at a 
reasonably accurate answer to the question. During the five years from 1959 through 






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1943, the "Digest" printed 1,908 articles of one page or more in length. Forty-two 
per cent, were genuine reprints, and fifty-eight per cent were either bona-fide or 
disguised originals. Thus approximately three out of every five "Digest" articles 
now originate in the "Digest's" offices » Or, in fewer words, considenbly less than 
half of its content is reaped from other. periodicals . Or, in still fewer words, 
"The Reader's Digest" is no longer primarily a digest. 

In the five years from 1939 through 1943, the "Digest" planted articles in 
more than sixty publications. 

"The Reader's Digest" feels that its planting operations are completely mis- 
understood. For example, it is inaccurate, the "Digest" explains to its critics, 
to say that a piece it sends to another magazine is a planted article; it should 
be called a cooperatively planned article* 

In the oast twenty-three years, "The Reader's Digest," which started out as a 
littlo magazine printing second-hand literature, has become one of the biggest 
things in publishing* The foundation of its great strength is its wide public 
appeals Since the magazine has always shown a conspicuous coyness about the true 
state of its circulation, the grand total of eleven million copies a month that i% 
now acknowledges may be quite modest understatement. The figure is, nevertheless, 
staggering* No othor magazine anywl-'-re in the world has ever done helf so " r ell. 

What makes "The Reader's Digest'' so interesting, probably no one knows, not even 
DeTitt Wallace, who is the founder, owner, and editor of the "Digest." Wallace ia 
regarded by many of his colleagues in the magazine business with the awesome respect 
that members of the American Chemical Society might accord a precocious youth who 
had discovered the formula for transmuting ba^e metal into golds Though he had no 
newsDaper or magazine experience, Wallace twebty-three years ago discovered the 
journalistic philosopher's stone, the formula that has made "The Reader's Digest" 
the most successful magazine in history. Naturally, he h^s been reluctant to reveal 
his magic formula. When asked about it, he usually replies, as he did a while ago to 
Kenneth Stewart, a writer for "FM", in misty generalities * "Frimerily, we are look- 
ing for articles of lastirg interest which will apoeal to a large audience, articles 
that come within the range of interests, experience, and conversation of the everare 
person. The over-all emphasis, for twenty-one yer.rs, has been a more or less con- 
scious effort to promote a Better America, with capital letters, with a fuller life 
for all, and with a place for the United States of increasing influence and respect 
in world affairs." These remarks, which sound more like a political-campaign Bpeec'i 
than a sober, scientific statement, give Wallace's colleagues few clues, for all they 
reveal is that the magazine's success is a result of its practice of printing articles 
of lasting interest. They do not answer the basic question: What is an article of 
lasting interest? Ferhaps neither Wallace nor anyone else can answer that question 
definitely, because whether an article is of lasting or only passing interest yeren J s, 
of course, on the person who reads it. 

Although Wallace does not talk about the "Digest" formula, its primary in- 
gredients can be identified by analysis* This is not an arduous process* One 
Important ingredient, for examole, was discovered by a magazine editor in reading a 
single issue of the "Digest*" Faving been invited to meet Wallace at lunch, the 
editor felt obligated to become acquainted with his host's magazine. H e bought a 
copy, read it through, and then said, "Sounds lik»?3* e goddam preacher wrote it." Thit 
offhand summary is not far from the truth; Wallaoe, whose family and editorial staff 
ere sprinkled with preachers, has an evangelical streak visible at a hundred yards. 
The ingredient in the "Digest" formula isolated by this analysis is Optimism, with, 
as Wallace might say, a capital letter. The quality of optimism in "The Reader's 
Digest" is not strained. It drips from every issue as sweetly as syrup from a maple 
tree. It is e brave and tender philosophy that has been well stated in "The 
Optimist's Creed," displayed in the Mayflower Doughnut Shops, which adjures all 
wayfarers through life, whatever may be their goal, to keep their eye upon the dough 
nut and not upon the hole. Because of the "Digest's" rampant optimism, which recog- 
nizes evil and misfortune only as manifestations of the Almighty's wisdom, or as 



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blessings in disguise, it has always been warmly acclaimed by large sections of the 

clergy. 

No matter how complicated the issue discussed in a "Digest" article nay be, the 

■rticlo contains nothing that cannot be grasped readily by a high school student of 
overage ability. There are no hard words. There are no difficult ideas. The 
articles re?d like stories in a primer. This quality results from the second in- 
gredient of the "Digest" formula, an ingredient that may handily called Simplism. 
This is the element thet gives all "Digest" articles the appearance, if not the 
actual quality, of simplicity* The difference between simplicity and simplism is 
something like the difference between sterling and plated silver. The presence of 
simplism can be readily detected in the finished product. Take a "Digest" article on 
taxes which says, "To dodge complications which might easily dribe you crazy, think 
simply of all taxes as falling into classes." Bodging complications is a form of 
simplism. Sometimes the "Digest" uses another form of simplism. This consists 
merely of saying something is "simple", and is based on the theory that saying a 
thing is simple mokes it so. In a recent piece on the renegotiation of war contrets, 
the "Digest" remarked, "The way to handle this problem is simple." Neither of these 
methods will take care of all problems, of course, but by using some version or other 
of th^ simplistic method, the "Digest" can turn out an article on a difficult 
scientific or economic topic so that it appears to be -«s simple as the hair-net 
industry of North China. 

Another easily identifiable element in the "Digest" formula is Dogmatism. The 
proportion of this ingredient in the formula has increased in recent years. '"Then 
the "Digest" was younger, divergent opinions circulated quite freely through its 
pages. As the magazine has aged, it has become afflicted with what one observer has 
diagnosed as hardening of the articles. The publication shows marked symptoms of 
bias on many subjects, most noticeably government and lcbor. The dogmatism in the 
"Digest" results from three editorial practices. First, though it still purports to 
be a balanced synthesis of the published word, it prints more unfavorable than 
favorable articles about certain subjects; its articles on the domestic policies of 
the Roosevelt Administration are an example. Second, by never printing a correction, 
the "Digest" surrounds itself with an aura of infallibility. Several months ago, the 
"Digest" ran a testy article called "You Can't Fey Workers That M u ch," which, in the 
opinion of Secretary of the Treasury Morgenthau, contained such a startling number 
of errors that he felt it necessary to point them out in a five-page letter. "I em 
sure you will agree with me," the Secretary said, "that your readers deserve to know 
the facts." Evidently the "Digest" did not agree, for it has printed nothing m:r; 
on the topic* 

The "Digest" has a unique approach to the animal kingdom. While not yet com- 
pletely convinced that the beasts in the jungle as as smart as the man in the street t 
the "Digest" seems to feel that the proposition hns groat merit. The "Digest" is 
perhaps the only serious magazine that hosalways treated talking dogs and thinkir.; 
horses with respect. It has given careful consideration to a Skye terrier "able to 
say and understand a few words," to a Shetland pony named Black Bear that coul i ?..-., 
subtract, do oube and square roots, and give King Solomon's dates, and to e cat nsr. = d 
Willy who knows when it's Monday because that's the night he goes to a bingo gome. 

The indications of the future of "The Reader's Digest" are clear from inter- 
pretations of the present i ""That Ford has done in automobile manufacturing, Wallace 
has done and is trying to do in publishing. Ford gave Everyman a car he could 
drive, ""Wallace gave Everyman some literature he coul i read; both turned the trick 
with mass production. Ford got to the top by standardizing engines, Wallace by 
standardizing ideas. Wallace has alrepdy m*de history by adapting the assembly- 
line technique to the production of literature, but he will make more, because he 
has that thing called know-how* In its development, "The Reader's Digest" of today 
is still in about the Model T stage. Like the Ford, the "Digest" will no doubt 
eventually become a slicker item. Instead of planting only some of its articles in 






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other magazines in order to"reprint "them, it may plant them all, thus safeguarding 
the "Digest" against the intrusion of any thoughts or opinions that did not originate 
on the premises. This would be fine not only for the "Digest" but also for the 
other magazines, which vrauld begin to look more end more as though they had caught 
on to the magic formula. People everywhere would think alike. And what happens 
where all think alike? The answer to that is simple, or at least simplistic. In 
the Kerch, 1934, issue of "The Reader's Digest", "falter Lippmann said: "There ell 
think alike, no one thinks very much*" The End. 



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ADVANCE "INVITATTOK TO LEARNING" SCHEDULE 

Listeners to Columbia network's "invitation to Learning," which presents en 
informal three-way discussion of one of the world's great books each Sunday 
(TABC-CBS, 11:30 AM-12:00 Noon, EST), now may obtain a schedule weeks ahead listing 
what's on the agenda. 

Books to be discussed through T''arch are: Feb. 17: Ecclesiastical Government- 
Pookor; Feb. 24: "Poetry — Browning. 

H arch 3| The Trojan T Yomen - Euripides; March 10: Science and the Modern 
Torld - ""Thitehead; March 17: Maxims - LaRochef oucauld; March 24: ""That is Art? - 
Tolstoy j and March 31: Peer Gynt - Ibsen* 






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Volume 15 



RRAILLF ROOF REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

March, 1946 



Number 3 



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Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and in Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 ^est 16 Street 
New York 11, * T .Y. 



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Braille Fdition Provided by the U. S» Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
end 
Printed at the American Printing TJ ouse for the Blind 
1R39 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address ell communicRtions to the editor, Lucy A. Goldthw^ite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 v fest 16 Street 
New York 11, AT. v. 



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Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Fand-cooiod Books 
Talking Books 

Mystsry ?*agazine to be Recorded 

Children's Stories Recorded in the 
Snanish Language 

Voices of Steel 

An Important Announcement from 
the Library of Congress 

American Foundation for Overseas Blind 

Braille Poets' Guild 

Theodore Dreiser 

Arthur Train 

The Library in Hawaii 

Lloyd C. Douglas from "twentieth 
Century Authors" 












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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, March, 1946 



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Book Announcements 
Press-m^de Books 

All oress-made or Talking Books here noted ore provided by the Federal Government. 

Conies of these government -supplied books ere placed in the twenty-seven regional 

libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in the 

Januarv and Juno numbers of this magazine. 

headers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of 

Congress to s--rve their respective territories. 

Tn th a list which follows, th° first book notation in every instance should be 

credited to the Book Review Digest unless anothw source is given. 

Abney, Louise. This way to better speech, lv Grade 1^ 1940 APF (Not a 
publication of the U. S. Government) 

Beebe, William, editor. The book of naturalists; an anthology of the best 
natural history. 7v 1944 APH 

Anthology of writings, ancient and modern, on natural history. The book is divided 
into parts, the first for naturalists before Darwin, the second for Darwin and 
those who followed him. Each part has an introduction by the editor, and short 
biographical notes about the naturalist. Stimulating reading for the unscientific, 
for anyone wishing to sample, in perspective, the many facets of this science. 

Calendar. Grade lg- (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 
An authorized reproduction of the ink-orint "Motto Calendar" comoiled and printed 
anonymously each year since 1884 by a Quaker family of Philadelphia. CoDics of this 
calendar were sent free of charge to all blind readers of the John Milton Magazine, 
with Christmas and New Year greetings from their sighted Christian friends. The 
available suDnly is limited. 

Crisp, K. B. Health for you. 6v 1944 APK (Not a publication of the U.S. 
Government ) 

Jnffe, Bernard. Men of science in America; the role of science in the growth 
of our country. 8v 1944 BIA 

Contents? Thomas Harriot; Benjamin Franklin; Benjamin Thompson; Thomas Cooper; 
Constantine Samuel Rafinesque; Thomas Say; w illiam T. G. Morton; Joseph Henry; 
M atthew Fontaine Maury; Louis J. R. Agassi z; Jamos Dwight Dana; Othniel Charles 
Marsh; J. "Yillar^ Gibbs ; Samuel Pierpont Langley; Albert Abraham Michelson; Thomas 
Hunt Morgan; Herbert McLean Evans; Edwin Powell Hubble; Ernest Orlando Lawrence. 

Search the scriptures, lv Grade l"g- (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 
Collection of Bible promises, tooically arranged, published and distribute i free of 
charge by the John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, *Iew York 

Simpson, Tilliam, The way of recovery, 2v NIB Pan ''a #92 (Not a publication 
of the TJ. S. Government) 

"This account of the marvels of plastic surgery (and much more) by an airm°n ba :'ly 
disfigure! by wounds has a poignant and heroic quality which has the effect of 
gre^t poetry." The New Beacon. 

Snow, Edgar. The pattern of Soviet power. 2v 1945 CPH 
In this volume an American reporter with considerable knowledge of both Russia and 
China outlines some of Russia*s attitudes and aspirations, ~>n such questions as 
the program for Poland, the Balkans, ani Germany, and the Mongolian frontier. He 
also discusses the relationship between the Soviet Union an i the government of 
Chiang Kai-Shek, and the possibility of Russia f s entry into the war with Japan. 
Contains chapters on Russian personalities* 

Sumner, H. L. The voice in the darkness. lv Gr^d 
Published anr 1 distributed free of charge by the John Milton Society, 156 Fifth Avenue, 
■w ew York 10, New York. This is a special message addressed to recently blinded men 
and women by a blind Presbyterian minister for recently blinded veterans. 



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Hand-copied Books 

This is a list of the hand-cooied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicate-" 1 these books ire in Grele lgr, 

Pow to locate han^-conied books in libraries: Following each title in this list you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of e city. These are abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blin^ and indicate the library in which you 
■""rill find the book. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names and address of 
each library, and also of publishing houses, is included in every June end January 
issue. 



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Aaberg, Jean L. ABC for mothers to be. 2v ^YPL 

Abrahams, Israel. Chapters on Jewish literature. 2v JPL 
Twenty-five short chapters on Jewish literature, th"t open with the fall of Jerusalem 
in 70 C.E. an^ ends with the death of Moses Mendelssohn in 1786. 

Balchen, Eernt, and others. Tar below zero, the battle for Greenland, Grade lg 
2y 1944 FYPL 

In the summer of 1941, an expedition le i by Colonel Bernt Balchen, veteran flier ar.- 1 
explorer, sailed under secret orders for Greenland. Their mission was to establish 
the northernmost rtmerican air base in the world. They discovered that the Germans 
already he q ^ weather station there in ''aily communication with Berlin. This station 
Colonel Belcher.' s men destroyed, T T oy 25, 1943" (Publisher's note) Besides Colonel 
Balchen's account of his experiences, the book contains Captain Monteverde's account 
of his crash or the icecap, as told to Major Oliver La Forge; and a first-person 
account of the mass cr^sh landing of six planes and twenty-five men on the- icecap on 
July 4, 1943. 

Christie, Agatha. Peril at End House. 4v Philadelphia Detective Story. 

Dickson, Carter, pseudonym. He wouldn't kill patience, 4v Chicago Detective 
story. 

Eisenschiml, Otto. Without fame. 8v Chicago. 

Forbes, Fathryn. Mama's bank account. 3v Philadelphia 
Collection of short stories all about one family. They wore Norwegian immigrants, 
settle^ in Sa^ Francisco, and presided over by a loving, understanding mother. Each 
story is an episode in the life of some member of mama's family, but mama is the 
re^l heroine e«ch time. 

Gale, Zona, pe^ce in Friendship Village, 4v H.Y. Guild Fiction 
Gold, Alfred. The most stupid of all races. 2v JBL 
A startling series of dialogues ani comments which completely demolish the insanities 
of the ATezis. The title was taken from a remark of Hitler who attempted to prove thrt 
the Jews were too clever for the rest of the world and for that reason had to be 
completely annihilated, 

"amilton, Alice, Exploring the dangerous trades. 8v N»Y« Guild, 
The autobiography of a woman doctor who pioneered in the relatively new field of 
occupational disease and fought for protection and compensation of the worker. She 
was an important figure in medicine and public health, and took part in many of the 
liberal-social projects of her time. 

Jaques, Florence Page. Birds across the sky, 3v Gra 4 e 2 1942 WfPL 
Although She acknowledges that she is "not a born ornithologist," the author married 
one, an^ her narrative is of her attempts to learn bird names and ways on her field 
trips with her husband. She includes many anecdotes of famous bird lovers she has met, 

Klausner, Joseph. Menahem Ussishkin, 2v JPL 
This book gives an interesting detailed occiunt of the famous Zionist leader's pic- 
turesque career. 












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Levin, Schmarya. Youth in revolt. 5v JBL 
Continuation of his autogiograohy, begun in "Childhood in Exile" (also in JBL). 
This second volume carries on its author's personal fortunes through the 80 f s and 
90' s, 9nd from Russia and Germany. Dr. Levin writes from the standpoint of the 
urofoundly sincere Jewish Nationalist. 

Lowdermilk, Walter. Palestine, land of promise. 4v JBL 
This important little book describes the dramatic transformation being made in the 
culture patterns of Palestine by Jewish refugee pioneers and suggests ways for 
further progress in the future. The author, assistant chief of the U.S. Soil 
Conservation Service, is well qualified to observe and advise in a situation that 
consists essentially of a regional apolication of the principles of conservation. 

Ruml, Beardsley. Tomorrow's business. 3v Chicago 

Rush, w . M. Rocky mountain ranger. 4v 1944 MPL 
The setting of this story is in the Rocky Mountains of Fontana, adjacent to Yellow- 
stone Park, and through its pages march the woolly herds of sheep, wild animals, 
good men and bad. Firk, the hero, must deal with them all— sometimes with only 
Flexyrn, the mare he alone has been able to break, to heln him. The unfolding of 
the story tells how Firk proved himself worthy of a place in the United States Forest 
Service. (for older boys.) 

Six lectures on Isaac Abravanel. 3v JEL 
Abravanel (1437-1508) was a Jewish theologian, biblical commentator and financier, 
b~>rn in Lisbon. He served as treasurer to Alfonso V of Portugal and was employed 
by Ferdinand and Isabella. Fis biblical commentaries arc netable for their interore- 
tation of the bo^ks of the Bible in terms of their historical and social backgrounds. 

Smith, Harold P. A treasure hunt in Judaism. 3v JBL 
Conveys to young readers the meaning and interpretations of the Jewish religien, its 
customs, oeremonies and observances. A Straight -fr om-the-sh ~>ulder book without a dull 
moment . 

Ten commandments; ten short novels of Fitler's war against the moral c^de, 
edited by A. L. Robinson. 9v JBR, NY Guild. 

Authors represented are Thomas Fann; Rebecca 'Vest; Franz Terfel; John Erskine; Bruno 
Fr°nk; Jules Romaine; Andre Faurois; Sigrid Undset; Fendrik Von Loon; Louis Br "-.field. 

Tucker, SoDhie. Some of these days, autogi ograohy of Sophie Tucker. FYPL 6v 
Grade 2; Chicago 9v Grade 1-g- 

Autobiography of a famous Jewish-American actress-singer, self-styled "the last of 
the Red Hat Famas." The story covers the early yeers af struggle and hardship as 
well as the years of success. 

Tolfe , Thomas. Of time and the river. 22v Chicago 
Eugene Gant, youngest son of the family made famous in "Look Homeward, Angel," takes 
le^ve of his mother and sister and starts off for his three years at Harvard. The 
^xoerionc^s here, the agonized waiting to hear whether or not his first play is 
accents, the years of teaching, his sojourn in England and France, all these form 
the background against which are thr own all the varied ners onalities and exDerienc°s 
he encountered, written in equally varied style running the entire range from utter 
lack of taste to heights of she<--r beauty. A work ">f genius. 

Wylie, Elinor. The Venetian Glass Nephew. 2v Grade 2 F.y. Guild Fiction 
An exquisite fairy tale for grown-ups, set in the late eighteenth century. Tells how 
lonely Peter Innocent Bon, Cardinal of the Congregational of the Propaganda of the 
Republic of Venice, had a nephew manufactured for him by two sorcerers out of Venetiei: 
glass, and what happened thereafter when said nephew wedded a wife of flesh and blood. 















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Talking Books 
(These books are provided by the U. S. Government unless otherwise noted) 



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Bruce, George, Navy blue and gold; a novel of Annapolis. 15r 1936 Reed by 
Barry Doig AFB 

This tale of Navy life is full of courage end sacrifice, of laughter and tears, of 
high ideals end deep loyalties. 

Kioling, Rudyard. A choice of Kipling's verse, made by T. S. Eliot with an 
ess^v on Rudyard Kipling. 17r 1943 Re^d by Harry Irvine AFB 

This volume contains a thirty-page critical ess^y on Kipling by T. S. Eliot, followed 
by n collection of ^bout 120 of Kipling's poems. 

*Vr« Eliot's volume assumes particular importance rot only as a scholarly and in- 
telligently chosen anthology, but in an even greater measure because his essay repre- 
sents en outstanding contribution in the field of criticism of an author of great 
stature who has been heretofore almost entirely neglected by the writers and commen- 
tators of his time." Saturday Review of Literature. 

Manchester, Farland. New world of machines, research, discovery, invention. 
21r 1945 Read by Jean Clos APF 

With release of war inventions, this greatest inventive age since development of the 
internal combustion, engine, will oortend for man's comfort in communication, housing, 
new motors, tools and processes. Author, from firsthand interviews vrith manufacturers 
^nd scientists, fascinatingly gives a bird's-eye view, tracing inventions and person- 
alities with historic backgrounds. Among the contents are radar, electric eye, polar- 
ized light, fluorescence, high octane gasoline, Moss and the turbosuperch^rger , gas 
turbines, Whittle and jetpropulsion, Sikorsky and the helicopter, self-oiling bear- 
ings, powdered metal products, synthetic products and tungtsen carbide cutting tools, 
"^nless you <^re willing to find yourself moving in a fog in the postwar world, over- 
whelmed by mysterious contraptions, you will want to read a book such as this to 
secure some comprehension of the monsters you must learn ti control, and with whom 
you may even appear to compete for your daily bread. Manchester follows standard 
formulas for writing popular books on science and engineering. He colors his story 
with the human side. On the whole, 'New World of Machines' is a thorough book. 
Book Week. 

Marsh, Irving and Edward Ehre, editors. Best sports stories of 1944. 16r 
1945 Re^d by Peter French APF 

Fifty some sketches from newspapers and magazines reflecting the American sport scene 
in wartime. Included are "sixteen of the year's best sports pictures and a sports 
record book including the year's headlines day by day, 1944 champions in ell sports^ 
track eni field and swimming records." 

Marshall, Bruce. The world, the flesh and Father Smith. 14r 1945 Read by 
Dick Crowley APF 

Portrait of a naive, humorous Scottish Catholic priest, whose cherished dream is that 
Scotland will return to the ancient faith. To that end he goes once a year to the 
protestant cathedral, to pr*y for Scotland's conversion. The sketches of Father 
Smith an^ his oarishinners cover the years 1908 to the present. "The World, the 
Flesh ani Father Smith" is delightful from start to finish. It surely -wouli disarm 
many bigots who fear and hate what they have not experienced. And the sincere, even 
gallant faith of the little priest warms the heart and f ee .Is the soul, even while the 
reader chuckles or sighs with Father Smith over the frailties of mankind • 
Voices of steel. See special notice in this issue. 



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MYSTERY MAGAZINE TO BE RECORDED 

Starting with the February issue, the American Printing House for the Blind, 
18.39 Frankfort Ave., Louisville 6, Ky., will record regularly the "Ellery Queen's 
Mystery Magazine." it will be available through the regular distributing libraries* 

The magazine is a monthly publication devoted to reprinting "the best detective 
stories, new and old." 



CHILDREN* S STORIES RECORDED IF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE 

"Cinderella and Other Stories" has been recorded in the Spanish language by the 
American Foundation for the Blind for distribution in Mexico* The Library of Congress 
has placed them in the libraries for the blind in this country in the hope that they 
will be of interest, not only to Spanish speaking person, but also to educate students 
Of Spanish* They are in one container, 17 records* 

Contents: Cinderella; The Moor's Legacy; The Master Singers; The Mischievous 
Princess; The Queen's Rose Tree; King of the Golden River; Gulliver in the Land of 
the Dwarfs; Iron He^d and Other Stories. 



VOICES OF STEEL 

The American Iron and Steel Institute has presented to the American Foundation 
for the Blind an unusual recording on which "The Voices of Steel" make themselves 
heard in authentic style* Recorded in the steel mills themselves, this disc captures 
sounds of all volumes and descriptions from the hiss of molten metal as it fills the 
ladle to the thunder of the rolling mills. The chief reason for the recording was 
to make an educational record for blind children which would punctuate and explain a 
I narration of the story of steel making* Through the cooperation of the American 
foundation for the Blind, 300 copies of "The Voices of Steel" are being distributed 
to schools and libraries for the blind throughout the country and two copies have 
been placed in each of the distributing libraries for use by all readers of Talking 
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AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

The Library of Congress is conducting a survey of your reading preferences and 
desires. In order to make its reading service as responsive as possible to the needs 
»!id wishes of all blind readers, the Library of Congress hopes that you will avail 
yourselves of this opoortunity of communicating your opinions, both as to reading 
tastes and your preferences, for either talking books or braille volumes. 

The Library of Congress is especially interested in the comment of all war- 
blinded veterans. Please address all communications toj Books for the Adult Divisir., 
Library of Congress, "Washington 25, Ti.C. 



AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR OVERSEAS BLIND 



The AMERICA* BRAILLE PRESS, organized in 1915, for the relief of the European 
Allies blinded in the first Torld Tar has recentl\ been affiliated with the 






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American Foundation for the Blind and is now known as the American Foundation for 
Overseas Blind. 

The American Braille Press devoted its efforts for many years to braille 
publishing, issuing magazines in is many as 8 langunrges for circulation in verious 
Eu^ooean countries, end publishing a number of excellent English books in Grade 
TVo ^t a time when books in this tyne were especially acceptable to readers in the 
T Tnitpd States. In 1932, the American Braille Press co-operated with the New York 
Public Library, Few York City, in establishing the Braille Book Review. The Review 
began life as a 64 page monthly, but was later out to 24 pages when the American 
Braille Press was forced to withdraw its support owing to diminishing funds. 

Peadquartors of the American Braille Press have always been in Paris although 
it is supported largely by American contributors. """Jhen the German army occuoied 
France, it was forced to suspend operations. 

George L. Raverat, director of the European office, showed great courage and 
ingenuity in saving over fifty tons of zinc plates and Dure copoer discs from 
seizure by the Germans who were in great need of just such metals. 

One of the first projects of Overseas Blind will be to organize a clothing 
drive for the blind peoole of Western Europe. Readers of the Braille Book Review 
^'ho wish to contribute to this drive may write to us for instructions as to when and 
where to send the clothing. 

Another undertaking of the organization will be the recording of Talking Books 
in French, esoecially for the use of those who were blinded in the war. Te shall 
be glad to know if readers of the Braille Book Review would be interested in having 
these books placed in the libraries of the United States. 



BRAILLE POETS' GUILD 

"Among the blind there are quite a happy lot who write poetry, not because they 
do it well, but because they enjoy writing and sharing it. By continually striving 
t ^ do more interesting work it will become go^d." So writes Vr . Merrill Maynard, 
a blind -"Titer of verse a n d the moving spirit in the Braille Poets* Guild. 

^he program of the Guild is the exchange of braille originals; distributing 
standard rules governing formal poetryj cash contents among members; stimulating 
the free publication of poetry written by members of the Guild. 

M r» Maynard h^ 5 recently published a volume of verse entitled, ".America Mine 
^nd Other Selections." 

If you are interested in becoming a member, send vour namo and address t ^ the 
Praille Poets' Guild, P.O. 245, Taunton, Mass* 



THEODORE DREISER 



Theodore Preiser, novelist and a prime mover in American re°lism for over h-lf 
a century, died December 28 at his home in Hollywood, of a heart attack, at the ago 
of seventy-four. 

The unh°pniness of his early childhood, the uncertainties between youth and 
first achievements, the recurrent . scorn and bitterness of his critics even as la 4 -- 
as 1925, b quarter of a century after his first novel, Sister Orrie, and his cumbrous 
literary mannerisms — all these are almost too familiar and will proBably be rightly 
dismissed in the final verdict. But his "deep human sympathy" and his fearlessness 
as a onetime lane realist «re among the gifts that prompted Mencken to sey ^f hinn 
"I can think of no American novelist who seems so secure or so likely to endure.' 1 




































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Theodore Dreiser's death marks the passing of a monumental figure who will bo 
discussed for generations, alike as novelist and social observer, before a final 
critical appraisal satisfactory to everyone can be arrived at-- if it ever oan be. 
But Dreiser's place as a protagonist in turn-of-the-century realism is already beyond 
dispute. 

Sister Carrie broke over the oountry like a bombshell in 1900. The youth of 
today, reading it for the first time, may well wonder why, for the grass of custom 
inevitably grows over the trail of the trail-blazing book. 

Dreiser wroto ponderously and awkwardly. God help the youngster who tries 
to model his own after Dreiser's prose style. But Dreiser also wrote honestly and 
sincerely, with depth and understanding end pity, and these are qualities that can 
always bear imitation. A tower has fallen — not a tower of architectural grace end 
beauty, but a tower that had stood as a significant and inescapable landmark in 
American literature for half a century. 

Editor's note: Among this author's book3 the following are in braille t 

American Tragedy llv APF 
A Hoosier Holiday lv Philadelphia 
Selected Short Stories lv NYPL 



ARTHUR TRAIN 



There have often been men in American literary history, too modest to pose as 
men of letters or great novelists, yet so keen in observation, and so skillful, that 
their books prove as memorable as more pretentious work. Such a writer was Arthur 
Train, who died December 22 in New York City at the age of seventy. His talent was 
extraordinary, as is proved by the wide and long success if his writings. And in one 
respect it rose to genius, and that was in the creation of character. Perhaps it 
would be better to say, one character. His Mr. Tutt became unquestionably the best 
known of American lawyers. And this was not only because Mr. Tutt, like many a 
Diokens character, was, thanks to his author, more real, more typically true to the 
legal personality than life itself. His just fame must also be attributed to a 
core of shrewd, typically American idealism. His object in life was to use the 
infinite resources of Yankee ingenuity to save the morally innocent from the clutches 
of the law, which, as Mr. Tutt used often to say, is bv no means synonymous with 
justice. 

Arthur Train himself had the great advantage of always knowing his subject. If 
he wrote a novel of the Balkans, it was because he had been there. If he wrote some 
of the best stories of salmon fishing, it was (partly) because he was an excellent 
fisherman. If he made drama out of the complexities of the lew, it was because he 
had been an assistant district attorney, and before that had served the poor and the 
weak -when trapped by the technicalities of legal procedure. And while he wrote for a 
large and often uncritical public, he worked os an artist, not as an artisan. N 3 
lab->r was spared — even to the thrice writing of n full-length manuscript — to meke his 
stories and his b voks as good as he could make them. Many a writer of our times of 
equal talent, and sometimes greater genius, has been slovenly and only semi-articulato 
by comparison. It was the realized authenticity of Mr. Tutt that caused a storm when 
Mr. Train wrote that much-loved character's autobiography. For many a reader refused 
to believe that Mr» Tutt was not the real man, and insisted that Arthur Train was jnly 
a pseudonym. 

American literature and the sociel and intellectual life of New York will both 






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suffer from the death of this quietly perceptive man, who was as much loved by his 

friends 8S was Mr. Tutt by the readers of the country* 

Editors note: Among this author's books the following are in braille: 

Princess pro tern 5v St. Louis 

Puritan's progress Chicago 

Mr. Tutt goes fishing lv Chicago 

Selected stories from Mr. Tutt ' s case-book 5v NYPL 

Should I apologize? lv Philadelphia 

Tassels on her boots 3v CPF 

Tutt and »'r, Tutt 3v BIA 



THE LIBRARY IH HAWAII 



Twenty-seven years ago on a stormy Pacific ocean a Japanese shin, loaded with 
a criw *nd passengers stricken with tronical fever, plowed its way toward Honolulu. 
On that ship was a baby, one year old. When the ship reached port, many of tho 
crew and most of the passengers were dead. 

But not the baby— a strong, healthy baby who hrd been born with perfect eye- 
sight, but who w^s now blind as a result of the tropical fever. 

From an interview given to a reporter on the service paper, "St'~rs and Stripes", 
we learn that the baby grew up to be a very useful citizen, no - " 1 ' Mrs . Dolores do Veyra, 
the mother of two fine youngsters and the he°d of the Department for the Blind in 
Honolulu's Public Library, which serves blind readers in all of the eight Hawaiian 
Islands. 

"it's strange," explained Mrs. de Veyrs, "but I didn't know I was blind until 
my two brothers and three sisters went off to school one day and I didn't go with 
them. I was terribly disappointed. I realized then that I was not like them." 

L^ter the child was enrolled in the Territorial School for the Deaf and Blind 
at Waikiki. Graduated among the first and also among tho highest from Oshu's 
school for the blind, she later went to the Washington State School for the Blind 
and won a scholarship to the University of Hawaii, from which she graduated. She 
wps later pdmitted t<o Columbia University and won a master's degree in the education 
of the blind. 

She returned to Oahu, was married, and after seven weeks, she went to the 
Philippines t i organize a school for the blind. This school W9S well on its way 
t^ success when war threatened. Evacuation of W)men and children began at once* 
After much delay, Mrs. de Veyra was permitted ti return t^ Honolulu. "I kept house 
and learn ' 1 how to omk by studying recipes written in braille and by practising 
°t the stove most of the day," -she said sailing. 

In a letter recently received by the Elitor from Mrs. de Veyra, she writes 
concerning her work: "Besides sending b o ->ks to our readers, we try to keep a slos 
an^ personal t moh with ^ur clients through correspondence when personal visits °r 
impossible . 

"With blind students who attend the public schools f^r the sighted, I have ir. 
the past aco^mnanied the social worker of tho Bureau of Sight Conservation to meet 
with the sighted teachers or principals of the various schools so as t^ a SCor toin 
the different textbooks needed f ^r the yenr and so as t^ give some idea as t N what 
b^ks are available in our library f^r the pupils' use. For texts not avrilnblo 
in our library and for those which cannot be substituted, texts are transcribed by 
the local transcribers who v>lunteer to do this j^b. 

"The sighted public is being educated thr^u^h Tur demonstrations an.' disrlry 
of braille material on Book Week as well as through articles through newspapers 






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about our work and service to our clients. Through this means, we have found 
many of our Talking Book Readers, and there is yet a great demand for more Talking 
Book Machines*" 

Mrs. de Veyra writes further of the need for a home -teacher in connection with 
her work ^nd explains that plans for e larger library may become a reality now th^t 
the war is over* 

Our congratulations and best wishes for oontinued success go to the Hawaiian 
Library and to Mrs. de Veyra , a gallant and accomplished worker in her chosen field. 



LLOYD CASSFL DOUGLAS (by special request) 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 



6 



Lloyd Cassel Douglas, American novelist, was born August 27, 1877, in Columbus 
City, Ind., the son of the Rev. Alexander Jackson Douglas (later n physician) and 
S^rrh J*r\e Douglas. He was educated at Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio. He 
was ordained as a Lutheran minister, and became castor of Zion Church, ITorth Man- 
chester, Ind. In 1904 he was married to Bessie Io Porch; they have two daughters. 

The next year he moved to the First Church, Lancaster, Ohio, and in 1908 to 
the Lutheran Memorial Church, Washington, D.C. While there he was chaplain of the 
First Infantry, District of Columbia. From 1911 to 1915 he was director of religious 
work °t the University of Illinois, then became mirister of the First Congregational 
Church in Ann Arbor, Mich., where he stayed till 1921. From 1921 to 1926, he was at 
the First Church in Akron, Ohio, from 1926 to 1929 at the First Church in Los Angeles, 
from 1929 to 1933 at St. James United Church, Montreal. He then retired from the 
ministry and now devotes all his time to writing. 

T "r. Douglas' first bnoks were entirely ->f a religious or inspirational nature. 
u e was in the midst if a series of lectures on "oers mality expansion" when Q t over 
fiftv, he suddenly wrote his first nwel, Magnificent Obsession. No one was more 
surprised than he at its immense success, or at that of his next novel, Forgive Us 
Our Trespasses. He said modestly : "Most reviewers are agreed that the author 
has done a clumsy pieoe of work, and wonder that the thing is read.... They are a 
pair of old-fashioned novels in which the characters are tiresomely decent and 
everything turns out happily in the end." 

Since then Mr. Douglas has added several more novels to the list. All are of 
the same nature, and all are enormously popular, both as bo^ks and, in most cases, 
as soreen plays later on» 

To the editors of this volume he writes j "if my novels are entertaining I am 
glad, but they are not written so much for the purpose of entertainment asof inspir- 
ation. There are many people who realize thoir great need of ethical aid spiritual 
counsel, but are unwilling to look for it in a serious homily or didactic essay. It 
has been my belief that many such persons can be successfully approached by a novel, 
offering in r. form palatable to them the inspiration they seek. 

"Looking back over the novels if the past half century that have contrived to 
outlive the decade in which they were published, one is impressed by the very 
considerable number of stories which have endured because of their moral purpose 
rather than their literary workmanship. 

"There will always be room fir the 'purpose novel,' and aspiring young writers 
will do well to consider the importance of the school of fiction that is more con- 
cerned with healing bruise' 1 spirits than winning the apol^use -f critics." 









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are in braille or as Talking 
APH 
Cincinsti, Denver, 

CPE 



Edith's n->tes Armng this authnr's books the following 
p ooksj Dispute'-" Passnge 4v BIA 28r 
Forgive Us Our Trespasses 8v 

Detroit, LC, Sacrament ) 
Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal 2v 
Green Light 3v CPR 19r AP^ 
Home fir Christmas lv Chicago, Cincinnati, LC, 

NLB, N.Y« Guild, Philadephie, Sacramento, 
Invitation to Live 5v Chicago, LC 
Magnificent Obsession 5v ARC, Jacksonville, Perkins, 

NYPL, Sacramento I4 r AFE 
Precious Jeopardy lv BIA 
The Robe 7v BIA 44r APF 

■"Thite Banners 4v APH 



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v o lume 1 5 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

April 1946 



Number 4 



Published Mont hi v. Except August, in Braille and in Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc» 
15 Test 16 Street 
New v rk 11, N.Y« 






• 



Braille Edition Provided by the TT» S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy A. Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 Test 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 















I 



Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-mede Braille Books 
Hand-copied Books 
Talking Books ' 

1f forld 1, fatchmnn--Trygve Lie of UNO, 
Taken from the " tT ew York Times" 
and "Current Biography" 



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2. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, April, 1946 



Book Announcements 
Press -made Books 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted ire provided by the Federal Government. 

Copies of these government-suoolied books are placed in the twenty-seven regional 

libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries apne^rs regularly in the 

Jnnu«ry and June numbers of the magazine. 

Readers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of 

Congress to serve their respective territories. 

In the list whioh follows, the first book notation in every instance should be credited 

to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given* 

Arne , Sigrid. United Nations primer; the key to the conferences. 3v 1945 CPH 
Brief discussions of the various international conferences and meetings which took 
olace during the war years. Includes full texts of important documents. Contents! 
The Atlantic Charter; The united Nations declaration; Casablanca; The Food conf arenc: ,• 
The first Quebec conference; Moscow; The United Nations relief conference; Cairo; 
Tehran; The Ilo meeting; Bretton ""foods; The second Quebec conference; The aviation 
conference; Yalta; The San Francisco conference. 

Ch^rt of the United Nations organization; prepared by E. 'Taterhouse with the co- 
operation of the Mep-of-the-Month Committee of Perkins Institution. 6 pages BMP 
Price 15 cents* 

Cuppy, Till. Utw to tell yiur friends from the apes. lv 1932 BIA 
The hermit of Jones* Island speaks freely of his ideas on such subjects as evolution, 
zoology, ornithology and a few others. You cannot credit h w hilarious these are un- 
less y^u re^d them for yourself. 

Dallirt, Tfcvid j. The Big Three; the United States, Britain, Russia. 3v 1945 CPH 
"Any thoughtful consideration of the Hnited Nations Charter drives home the fact that 
the immediate future of civilization depends uoon the policy-makers of the United Fing- 
dom, th° Soviet TTnion, and the TT n ited States. It is especially important for all of 
us to become well informed concerning the resources, national aspirations, p nd recent 
mliticil history of these three 'super powers » T For such a puroose, Mr. Dallin's 
factual presentation is -""ithnut a peer. It relates the international diplomacy Df 
each to the internal policies from which the foreign policy of any nation inevitably 
stems* It appraises each country with regard to its war-making potentialities and its 
requirements for national security. Many recent events in the history of both Great 
Britain and the Soviet Union, that have aroused suspicion in America, are placed in 
true perspective*" Scientific Book Club* 

De Sohweinitz, Farl* Growing up; the story if how we become alive, are born and 
grow up, second revised edition. Pamphlet APH Price 45 cents. 

Ford, Leslie, pseudonym. The Philadelphia murder story. 2v 1945 CPF 
Leslie For^ wins our medal-of-the-month for this top-drawer story about the body fouu 
in the goldfish pool in the entree lobby of the Curtis Publishing Company, Independence 
Square, Philadelphia. That charming widow, Grace Latham, tells the tale in her bast 
style, improved if anything by the n<^tur Q of her material. 

Gerberding, G. F. The way of solvation in the Lutheran church. 2v Grade l? 191 
BIA (Not ^ publication of the Unite-' States Government ) 

Jackson, Joseph Fenry, editor. Continent's end; a collection of California 
writing. 5v 1944 BIA 

Joseph Fenry Jackson, literary editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, whose daily 
column an^ Sunday supplement are omong the tall, too few, outlying lighthouses ir. B 
country which has allowed New York to absorb most American criticism, possessed him— 
self of © brilliant i^er*. an-^ most expertly put it int 3 effect. 



3. 



Jackson exoleins in his introduction who these many writers ere: ell Calif ornians 
bv birth or adoption, most of them are writers of today, now in the full stride of 
their production — people like John Steinbeck, John Fante ; Jo Pagano, and "filliam 
Saroyan. It is today's California that they portray in ell its exuberant vitality end 
some of its profound conflicts .- 

Faempffert, Waldemar P. Science today and tomorrow* 3v 1945 F?T 
"The first series of this book appeared six years ago. In this second series, the 
science editor of the Few York Times has made a careful revision of the first, end 
«dded a grant deal of fresh material* The tonics discussed range from new advances 
in synthetic ohemistry and electronics, new aspects of the sun °nd other members of 
the sol^r system, explorations into the upper atmosphere and beyond in rocket shius, 
to thoughts on evolution, brain waves ^nd sychology-" New Republic 

Felland, C. Be Alias Jane Smith 2v 1944 BIA 
Story of a refugee grand duchess v who arrives in New York with four bewhiskered , ex- 
cbinet members, and sets up in the interior decorating business, with the help of an 
Am a ric f, n marine, a society columnist, and a woman of wealth, if not grace. 

Froll, v. P. Fury in the earth; a novel of the New Madrid earthquake. 3v 1945 BIA 
During the winter of 1811-1812, a series of earthquakes occurred in Missouri end Tenn- 
essee, finally resulting in the destruction of a once-thriving river town, New Madrid* 
The author who knew this country in his youth, has in this novol given en account 
of how the inhebitants of New Madrid were affected by the earthquakes and the subsequent 
rising of the river. 

Perrin, P«. C. ""Triter's guide and index to English (selections from) 6v 1942 AP" 
(^ T ot a publication of the United States Government) Published by the Fedley Correspond* 
ence School. 

Polner, Tikhon. Tolstoy and his wife; translated by Nicholas Treden. 3v 1945 
CPP 

Probably the best biogranhical study of the great Russian novelist now available in 
English. This analytical account of Tolstoy's mature ye^rs catches the soirit of e 
rebellious personality and of the circle in which he lived. It places emohasis on his 
philosophical growth and the parts his clos ^ associates played in th^t development. 
Fis letters, novels, dieries and those of his family end friends are used to documont 
the evolution of his ideas. 

Podenberg, L. w . Key to grade three: e revision of "Alphabetical key to grade 
three," 1926 edition; based on the text "Revised braille for reading end writing 
grad- three," J ublished in ink and braillo by the NIB, 1908. lv APF Price S2.00. 

Schauffler, R.F. , editor. Our American holidays: Christmas; its origin, c:le- 
bration eni significance as related in prose and verse. 3v Gra^e 1^ 1907 APF (Fot 
a publication of the United States Government) 

Shellabarger, Samuel. Captain from Castile. 7v 1945 APF 
k lively, action-packed historical romance, which reanimates the interlocking Df the 
old ^r\c\ the new worlds, the scourge of the Inquisition and its injustices, the hist try 
meking campaigns of the Cortes, the downfall of the Indian Empire, the wiles an I 
tre-cheries of conqueror and conquered, the fabulous - eni unpleasant - aspects of 
the new country, and the interplay of international politics. Plenty of color, irerae, 
sw-^r^pley, and escape while you may. "Captain from Castilo" is o st ^ry in the Dum r s 
tradition? nor is it any me°n representative of th"t traditi on. Offering a rich feast 
of derring-io, for continuous suspense, action and color, it promises to be a leader 
"mong the season's bargains. 

Snow, E^gar. People on our side. 4v 1944 BIA 
An exhilarating book to read - it gives one a fueling that with enough understating, 
the chances of a better post-war world are greater. But e depressing book is the pic- 
ture of ineptness, inadequacies, end self-inter est which must be overcome. Important. 
Th author visited some seventeen countries, but the book is devoted mainly to his 
'Oxp^rionces in Russia, China an-' India, 

Snf»nish language: El camino real (Understanding cur Spanish-speaking neighbors. 
by E.M. Jarrett. lOv 1943 APF (Not a publication of the United States Governmsrm) 
























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Taylor, ".F. Braille mathematical notation; compiled by John F. Curtis and 
Fnrjorie S. Sooner. }v Grode- 1^ r ,APH(2nd A^.ericnn revision, 1942 ) ^"ot a publication 
of the United States Gov^rn^ent ) 

Tescott, Glenway. Apartment in Athens. 2v 1944 BIA 
^ovel based on the occupation of Greece by the Nazis. In it a bullying Nazi officer, 
quartered on a meek middle-class Greek family, encompasses the destruction of the 
husband. Then the stricken wife plans that her young children shall join the under- 
ground movement. 

A novel of power and insight which ooncerns a family in German-occupied Greece in 1943, 
It holds you spellbound as you ee^ into the hearts of the Greeks in their effort to 
fathom the character of the German. Their keen analysis of the mentality of the Ger- 
mans may well be a message to ^11 freedom-loving peoples. 

Williams, Oscar, editor. Few poems. 3v 1944 BIA 
Anthology of modern poetry, including work of both British and American poets. This 
volume contains a section of poems written by men in the armed forces. Portraits of 
some of the poets, and brief biographical data. 

■Voodward, T. E. Feeding dairy co^s . United States Department of Agriculture 
Farmers* Bulletin, revised November 1940. lv APH Price $1.50. 

Hand-Copied Books 

This is a list of the hand-cooied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated these books °re in Grade lg-. 

Fow to locpte hand-copied books in libraries | Following each title in this list you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the library in which you 
will find the book. A key to these abbreviations, giving the name and address of 
each library, and also of publishing houses, is included in every June and January 
issue. 



Ag°r, Uerbert. A time for greatness. 1943 4v NYPL 
Also available as a "Panda" in Grade 2. ""Then this book was published, the "Saturday 
Review of Literature" called it an "outstanding document of our times." Agar urges 
us to take vigorous action to preserve peace, 

Alessios, Alison B. Buffo and Petro* lv NYPL 
Light, amusing story with a Greek setting. For biys and girls, and even grownups. 

Carswell, Catherine. Robert Burns, lv Grade 3 NYPL 
The author is conspicuously free from moral prejudices, she d^es not suppress anything 
that is relevant, she has been obviously content throughout with nothing less than th:- 
original sources, and her one desire, it is perfectly clear, is to present a true pic- 
ture. She has also discovered, or released, a quantity of material which has appeared 
in no former life of Burns. The result is that she has crested a new literary chsrrc- 
ter, a figure which seems almost novel after the conventional ^ne. 

Coates, Eleanor. Five short stories from Cosmopolitan magazine, lv Grade 2 
1944 and 1945 NYPL 

Colver, Alice Ross. Joan Foster, freshman. 3v Grade 2 ^YPL Fiction 

Dempewolff, Richard. Animal reveille* 4v Grade 2 1943 NYPL 
In all wars, animals have played an important part, but in no war were more used than 
in w orld 'Tar II. Fere are accounts of mobilized mules, hnrses, cats, dogs, and pigeons 
their training and their accomplishments, with sidelights in their individual charac- 
ters. Do not miss the chapter on mules i 

Dos Passos, J.R. Number one. 4v Grade 2 1944 W, Y. Guild 
A fictional portrait of an American demagogue, obviously based on the life an" career 
of Fuey Long. The story is chiefly from the point of view of Chuck Crawf ^r;' f s secre- 
tary, Tyler Spotswood, oiler brother of the Glenn Spots"wood who was the hero of 
"Adventures if a young man." 


















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5. 



Eichelberger, Clark M. The United Nations charter; what was done at Sen Fran- 
cisco. 2v Grade 2 NYPL 

A manual for the use of those who wish to know just what the United Nations agreed 
to at the momentous conference held in San Francisco. 

Foote , J. T. Fatal gesture, lv NYPL, Sacramento, Salt Lake City Fiction 

Gann, E. F. Island in the sky. 3v NYPL 
Storv of on airplane, the Corsair of the Army Transoort Command, end her orew of five* 
The shin is forced to make a landing in the uncharted wastelands of northern Canada* 
Th3 terror, the courage, and the emotions of the men are all pictured during the an- 
xious time until their rescue is assured* 

Hayes, W* C. Daily life in ancient Egypt* lv NLB 

Fill, Grace Livingston. Matched Debris. 6v NLB Fiction 

Fughes, Dorothy. The blackbirder. 3v Grade 2 NYPL 
A young French refugee in this country, trying to avoid being charged with murder, 
keeps the conventional one jump ahead of both Nazi and anti-Nazi agents in her efforts 
to find the man who smuggles refugees across the Mexican border. 

Joslin, E. P. A diabetic manual, for the mutual use of doctor end patient. Re- 
vised edition. 4v Grade 2 NYPL 

A practical manual planned to help the doctor educate the diabetic patient end to guide 
the patient to help himself. The author is an authority on his subject. 

Faemoffert, Waldemar B. Science enlists for the war; and, editorials condensed 
from the New York Times Magazine of November 2, 1941, and Science Digest, February 
1942. lv *TPL 

Maugham, W« Somerset. The razor's edge. 6v Grade 2 Chicago, New York Guild 
Character study of a young American, a flyer in World War I, who returns to his home 
in Chicago in 1919, vaguely conscious that he is missing something. To the horror of 
the girl who wants to marry him, he will not take a job; he wants to "loaf •" He goes 
to Paris and then to India in search of his ideal, and finds a certain measure of 
personal peace, but sacoeeds in making life even mora difficult f or those who have 
tried to make him lead a conventional life. 

Maxwell, William* They came like swallows. 2v Grade 2 NYPL 
A simply told story of family life, this book is warm with sensitive feeling and lov- 
ing understanding. The children are real, and their relation to their mother is 
beautifully shown, with neither too much nor too little interest. 

- Morton, Jane. Blackbirds on the lawn. 3v Grade 2 NYPL 
A short novel, written in a style of simple, quiet beauty which has for its theme the 
story of two Fentucky families and their long feud based on land-pride. Warmly human 
in feeling, the book will be a pleasure to all who oare about ordinary life and ord- 
inary people. (Available also as a Talking Book.) 

Park, Dorothea. Here comes the postman, lv Grade 2 NYPL 

Parsons, R» P. Mob 3| a naval hospital in a South Sea jungle. 4v Grade 2 1P45 
NYPL 

Captain Parsons was a navy medioal officer who commanded a naval mobile hospital on a 
South Sea island, and his book tells with humor and charm about his experiences there; 
a thoroughly interesting book. 

Pryce-Jones, Alan. Beethoven, lv Grade 3 NYPL * 

Reed, Trumbull. Courage has eyes. 7v NLB 

Roos, Felley. Murder by degress; from American Magazine, lv Grade 2 NYPL 

Ruml, Beards ley. Tomorrow's business. 3v Grade 2 1945 NYPL 
This is a thoughtful treatment of the relations between business end government, by 
■which the author hopes t o point safe directions and clear courses f^r tomorrow's bus- 
iness. Mr. Ruml is a successful and prominent businessmen, and his ideas are import- 
ant as a contribution to a troubled question. 

Spal- : ing, Charles, and Otis Carney. Love at first flight. 2v Grade 2 NYPL 
hilarious account of the training days of one Lester Dowd, naval aviator. At first 
glance, this book is merely another amusing collection of cracks — some wise, some 












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ether-wise — taking a hunt-club boy from a snobbish Chicago suburb over the humps of a 
tough flying course < On second thought there is much between the lines which is 
neither funny nor entertaining, but which is highly significant and very informative. 

Steiner, Rudolf. Metamorphoses of the soul; translated by G. Metaxa. 6v Grade 
2 * T YPL 

Thirkell, Angela .. Cheerfulness breaks in; a Barsetshire war survey. 5v Gr^de 
2 NYPL 

The Pirketts marry off Rose, their problem daughter, only to find Gereldine takes 
up -where Rose left off* There ere three romances; and there is the war, faintly., enc 
not too grimly, flavoring the whole, with servant trouble and blackouts, with young 
men joining up^, with petrol rationing, profiteers and an aura of uncertainty, 

Tunis, John R.. Keystone kids.- 3v NYPL 
This is the story of two brothers who came from a minor league baseball team to join 
the Brooklyn Dodgers = Told in the authentic language of the professional baseball., 
in ■""'hich the issue of race nrejudice threatens the strength of the team. 

w ilson Mitchell* St^lk the hunter; en Inner Sanctum mystery. 3v 1943 T "YPL 
A young Czechish girl in peril at the hands of a nest of foreign agents in Manhatt ■ 
is s^ved by an American ehemis'u 

bright, A.M,R„ The dramatic lif« of Abraham Lincoln. 7v N«Y« Guild. 

Talking Books 
(These books are provided by the United States Government unless otherwise noted) 



Best, Herbert*, Voung'un a 2Sr 1944 Read by Livingston Gilbert APP 
Almost a saga of the early fur-trading days of Lake Champlain soon after the Revolu- 
tionary " r ar. The story is orimarily connected with the ingenuity of a family of 
children left on their o"wn after their makeshift home was destroyed by fire, their 
mother burned to death and their father dep°rted to seek new fur-trading fields. 
(Available in braille) 

Deweerd, Major F. A. Great soldiers of Torld ,v ar II. 20r 1944 Read by "falter 
Gerard APH 

PiTgraphicnl sketches of: Gamelin, DeGaullo, 1! 7avell, Rommel, Montgomery, Hitler, "Vinst 
Churchill, Timoshenko, Mackrthur, Chiange-Kai-shek, Eisenhower; explaining in a read- 
able manner their military tactics and the events that have occurred. Author states 
in foreword that he "h°s had access to a groat deal of classified material as s nec- 
essary p^rt of his work on the staff of a military periodical;" that the opinions 
expressed and conclusions drawn are his own. (Available in braille) 

Disney, Dorothy Cameron* The seventeenth letter. IBr 1945 Read by Dorothy 
Dalt^n AFB 

A combination murder mystery and spy story, the scene of which is Canada, particularly 
Halifax. 

Ferber, Edna. Great son. 16r 1944 Read by George Patterson APH 
Chronicle of four generations of a Seattle family, the Melendys, beginning with the 
pi ~rival of the first of the family sn the west c ^st in 1851, and ending with the 
gr^at-grandson of old Madam Exact Melendy, wh -> joined the American Air C ->rps ">n the 
flqy of P^arl T^rb^r. (Available in braille) 

T'en-'riok, Bayna^d, Lights ^>ut § 16r 1945 Read by Alexander Scourby AFB 
T h*o creator of the blini detective, Duncan Maclain, has here written a different ki*- 
of niv?l, the story of a y:>ung American soldier, blinded in Italy, and his fight t N 
achieve a normal, happy existence. 

Fnott, V t O'^alley, an^ 1 Page Copper. Gone away with O'Malley. 17r 1944 Read 
by Dick Crowley APH 

Autobiography of an Irish-American who has loved horses all his life — as the son of 
an Irish doctor who kept two hunters, as strbleb w and odd-jobs man during his oarly 
days in America, as veterinarian and founder and promoter of hunt clubs in New Jersey. 













































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Nissley, Charles H. Home vegetable gardening. 16r 1942 Read by P<-ul Clark A'f 
Contains chapters on the fundamentals of vegetable growing soil preparation, plantir 
storage, diseases, end pests — followed by an alphabetical list of the more important 
vegetables with descriptions, cultural hints, uses, etc. There is a section on hert 
crops, and one on seed end seed treatments. The author is Extension Horticulturist 
in vegetable growing at Rutgers University. 

Short, Luke, pseudonym. And the wind blows free. lOr 1945 Reed by William 
La^ar AFP 

historical romance of the Indian grasslands that later were to become o pert of Okla- 
homa. Ix, is the story of fabulous Jim Tade, a. Texas cattleman, and how he met the 
edict of President Cleveland who, fearing an Indian uprising, ordered all cattle 
va^at^d from the Reservation in an impossibly short time. This account of lonely 
frontier towns, wild country, and ambitious men makes an exciting ' Testern." 

Techsberg, Joseoh. Looking for a bluebird. 14r 1945 Read by Kermit Murdock ATI 
Twenty-one witty sketches, many of which first appeared in the New Yorker. They are 
descriptions of the life in the author's native Prague, in France, and on tourist 
steamers Fr. Techsberg is a musician, and is now an American citizen and in the Uni* 
States Army. 



TORLD TATCHMAN— TRYGVE LIE OF UNO 
Taken from the New York Times and "Current Biography" 



The Secretary-General of the United Nations, Trygve Lie, came to his new post 
with a "recognized talent for negotiating." Legal adviser to Norway's Labor Party 
for eighteen years, he entered the Norwegian Cabinet with the Nygaardsvold Ministry 
of 1935, and since 1941, has been Norway's Minister of Foreign Affairs* In the letter 
post, -observers point out, he was equal to the delicate task if maintaining fri r.dly 
relations with both Great Britain and Russia. 

Trygve Halvdan Lie was born in Oslo, the capital of Norway, on July 16, 1896. 
Fls father, Martin Lie, a carpenter, died while Trygve was only a small boy, but his 
mother saw to it that her son received a good education. Young Lie helped out by 
working as an office boy at the National Headquarters of the Norwegian Labor Party in 
Oslo, a job which he held through b }th his gymnasium and college years. He had early 
acquired an interest in politics, and while still in high school, at the age of six- 
teen, he was elected president of the Aker(e suburb of Oslo) branch of the Labor Party. 
In 1914, he entered the University of Oslo as a law student, retaining both the Aker 
presidency and his job as office boy. And in 1919, the same year that he graduated 
from the Oslo University Law School, Trygve Lie was appointed Secretary^-Genera 1 of 
the Norwegian Labor Party. He was then twenty-three years old. 

In 1922, the lawyer, who the previous year has been elected president of the re- 
gional branch of his party in the province of Akershus, of which Oslo is the cacital, 
was appointed legal adviser to the Norwegian Lab^r Party. F:^ur years later, he was 
ma^e a member of the National Council of the Party. Lie was thus in the forefront of 
the developing labor movement, an imoortant figure during the growth of Norway's larg- 
est political party. As legal adviser it fell to his lot to deal with the disputes 
and controversies which arose between labor and management as the workers gained in 
poorer, pnd to fight many test cases for the Party in court. He occuDied the positirr. 
until 1940 and is given much of the credit for the peaceful settlement of disoutes 
usually effected. During his last ten years, it is pointed out, strikes were pr^otical 
ly non-existent in Norway. 

The socialist lawyer served as Minister of Justice until June 1939, when a Cobir, - 
reorganization made him Minister of commerce, At the outbreak of Torld Tar II in 
Spotember of that year, however, the Storting, having learned the lesson of the blocic- 
ade in Torld Tar I, established a Department of Shipping and Supply with Cabinet 

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status, to -which post Prenjier Nygaardsvold apoointed Trygve Lie on October 1. Lie 
began at onoe to build up Norway's stores of supplies, and at the beginning of the 
Carman attack on April 9, 1940, it was calculated that food suonlies were sufficient 
for three years to come* "The fact," said en official Norwegian source after the 
liberation, "that the Norwegian poDulation has fared comparatively well as far as 
food is concerned during five years of occupation— in spite of German plunder and 
requisitioning — is to a large extent due to Mr. Lie's foresight." 

On April 9, at an emergenoy meeting, the Nygaardsvold Cabin* tendered its resig- 
nation to King Haakon and the Storting, but was refused. Instead, before adjourning 
for the duration of the occupation, the Storting designated the Nygaardsvold Cabinet 
th° lawful governing body of the kingdom and directed it to continue the fight from 
outside the country, if neoessary. During the two months of fighting before the firal 
capitulation, the King and government remained in Norway, and although forced to flee 
before the advancing Nazis, were able to organize Norwegian resistance, bolster morale, 
and carry on necessary administration. 'While the Government was thus being hounded 
from place to place, Lie was busy organizing supplies for both military and civilian 
use in the unoccupied areas of the country. By adroit management he was able to 
salvage large quantities of supplies from occupied southern Norway- -enough, it is said, 
to have carried on the campaign in the north through the summer and succeeding winter 
had adequate military support been available. To Lie must likewise go the credit for 
saving Norway's huge merchant fleet for the Allied cause i working In a small village 
in the Romsdel valley, the Minister of Shipping and Supply, with characteristically 
s^ift decision, drew up the provisional regulation placing that part of the shipping 
not yet in German hands (about 85 per cent approximating one thousand ships totalling 
more than four million tons) under Government administration--recording it originally 
on a piece of p°per torn from a scrapbook. (One of the last of the ministers to leave 
Oslo, he had moved on, just out of reach of the advancing Germans.) 

Lie's public activities during the first Assembly of UNO and the Security Counoil 
in London were not spectacular. He did not preside, he attended, and he left the 
table-banging to others. Indeed, were it not for a certain intensity of expression 
this heavy-shouldered man, who sat stolidly through the sessions, would have passed 
for a house detective. Like Clement Attlee, Lie is at his best in committee, where 
his integrity, firmness and willingness to see both sides of any question are impress 
sive. Fe is not the type of man who lends himself to political exploitation, having 
no great attraction as a speaker. But ho has moral qualities that the world and UNO 
need* 

Lie at 50 is a plain man speaking and working for the plain people of the world 
and all their hopes. His intellect and ability are far above the average but, during 
the last seven years, he has encountered the physical and mental dangers Thich have 
beset the average man in Europe. The experience endowed him with a sense of kinship 
with the people not only of western Europe but of the world. 

There are few grays in Lie's character. He is a study in black and white. Touch*" 
ness, a combination of peasant shrewdness and strong will working with one of the b t 
legal minds Norway ever produced, is perhaps his outstanding characteristic. But t..is 
toughness is balanced by genuine friendliness. That much-overworked word, "charm," 
applies to Lie. Capable of great affection and loyalty of friends and subordinates, 
he can be rousingly angry in a manner which shakes his associates, but sometimes cloars 
t he air. 

In late years he has learned to curb his rages and tendency to talk too freely 
about his work. Today he exudes affability. His face, long and rounded, breaks into 
frequent smiles. He gestures often with his hands and manages to do it gracefully 
despite the fact that each hand is as large as a small ham. 

Generally, his tall, strong body, which is just beginning to run to fat, is 
clothe^ impeccably in a blue double-breasted suit* He has learned the polite chit- 
chat of cocktail diplomacy, although like many members of Britain's present Labor 
Government, he dislikes this form of social intercourse* His attitude toward the 



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9. 



trapDings with which many wish to adorn the UNO's new home reflects his affeotion 
for plain people and plain speaking. 

"I don't want the UNO to have too much or ask for too much," he said shortly 
before he left for America. *' No palaces and extensive and expensive grounds* Just 
plain Government buildings, the kind that American officials would want if they were 
abroad. 'We are not coming to the United States es anything but Die in people. 'To 
are not coming as rulers or anything like th^t* We are plain peoole working for 
plain peonle all over the world and we hope that this will be understood in the Unit d 
States. I hone we can show we ore working in the interests of all common men and 
women everywhere and working without the old diplomatic tricks*" 

Lie, both as a person who throughout his life h^s seen problems successfully 
solved by negotiation and discussion and as B moderator for a voiceless section of 
humanity in the councils of the great, plrces primary importance on international 
discussion either inside or outside of UNO, although naturally he hopes end expects 
that more of the world's oroblems will be deposited on IP'O's doorsteps* 

Lie himself has come very far on his own ability in discussion and debate in 
Government councils, in the law courts and in the rough-and-tumble of Norwegian 
party politics e Fe has discussed world affairs with Norwegian seamen and English 
Tommies and listened to voices of men who helped to shape the world in which he sees 
the TTnited Nations as the greatest hope* 

A quarter of a century ago he listened to Lenin in the Kremlin for three hours 
and during the war he sat in the Thite H~>usn and Downing Street and heard Roosevelt 
end Churchill discourse on the world ns they saw it* 

Lie got his start in life in an industrial suburb of Oslo, where his mother kept 
a boarding house. It was a textile center and Lie as a sohoolboy heard Swedish 
syndicalists and Norwegian labor union members debating their rights and wrongs as 
he tailed over his books* 

Like many another poor boy watching his mother work, he resolved to grow rich 
and famous* His "regg to riches" story went according to the Horatio Alger routine 
1914, when he entered Oslo University* But Oslo at the start of the first World 
War was not Mr. Alger's America and Lie, instead of following the conventional 
scenario by entering a business, saving it and marrying the daughter of the boss, 
found himself in the thick of turbulent Norwegian Labor party politics and keeping 
company with Fjordis Joergensen. daughter of the local station master* 

Lie's preoccupation with boiks and politics did not prevent him from becoming a 
first-class football player and track athlete at Oslo University* But ivhen he recei" 3 
his law degree, he was already secretary to Martin Trammel, secretary of the Norwegian 
Labor Party* In 1921 he married Fjordis Joergensen and journeyed to Moscow as sec- 
retary of a Labor Party delegation* It was during his visit that Lie listened to 
Lenin talk for three hours* 

Lie's political character, like that of many another public men of our tinc-s, en 
best be assessed by his personal reaction to two principal political doctrines which 
h°ve flowered curing the first half of the twentieth century: communism ano" fascism* 
As a Socialist he has been extremely interested in the progress of socialism in Rur Lfl 
an^ as a European he is fully alive to -the Soviet Union's Dositiin as a great power i: 
Europe arH the world. Put since he is a Scandinavian Social Democrat he favors oh* 1 ~: 
bv evolution rather than revolution, and since he is Norwegian and a western Europ , 
he believes firmly and fervently in those freedoms residing in the Bill if Rights. 

In his present position, Lie inevitably is a target fir speculation ?n the sud- 
ject of "who is backing him." The subject is a fruitless one, for Lie happens tc 
backed by two of the strongest powers. Contrary to popular opinion it was not Russia 
that first proposed Lie for en important post in the tFTO* It was the United States. 
The State Department suggested to the Russians in November, 1945, that Lie might make 
a likely President of the Assembly* When this post went to Paul Henri Soark, the 
Russians advocated Lie for the post of Secretary General, which he now holds* 

So today Norway's "man of the people", who has walked with the groat of the 



10. 



world and kept touch with the common people, is in a position where he can do the 
most good for the men and women of the class from which he sprang and for which he 
reserves his greatest affection. Cartoonists sometimes see him as an affable, al- 
though emotive, barrage bnlloon. His friends in every country think of him as a 
tough, determined fighter for peace and men's rights. 



"^oitor's note; Included in this April issue are several titles related to WO. These 

-,re fis follows? 

Arne, Sigrid. United Nations Primer. 3v CPH 

Chart of the United Nations Organization. 6 pnges WP 

Dpllin, D. J, The Pig Three. 3v CPU 

Eichelbergzr ? Co f. ; -. United Nations Charter. 2v WTPL 






-Jui&t*. 



Volume 15 



P^AILLE PO^K RE'TEW 
A Guide to Braille <md Talking Book Publications 

May, 1946 



Number 5 



Published Monthly, Exceot August, in Braille and in Mimeograohed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 Test 16 Street 
*iew York 11, w.Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the IT. S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy A. Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Street 
w 9 w York 11, V .Y, 



^-•3 



Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 
Hand-copied Books 

TOiy Not Say "Thank You" ? by 
Harold Rowley 

The Coming Convention 

Lists of Talking Eooks Issued by 
The Library of Congress 

k Poet on the Teaching of Poetry, 
by Leonora Speyer 



1. 



Maureen Daly. Taken in part from 
"Current Biography" 



2. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, May, 1946 

Book Announcements 
Press-made Books 



All oress-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Government, 

Conies of these government -supolied hooks ore placed in the twenty-seven regional 

libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries apoears regularly in the 

January and June numbers of this magazine. 

Readers are required to borro™ books from the library designated bv the Library of 

Congress to serve their resoective territories. 

In the list which follows, the first book notation in every instance should be 

credited to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given. 

Bonsai, SteDhen. Then the French were here; a narrative of the sojourn of the 
French forces in America, and their contribution to the Yorktown camoaign; diawn 
from unpublished reoorts and letters of oarticioants in the Notional Archives of 
France and the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress. 4v 1945 APF 
For a delightful excursion into an eventful and interesting chapter of Amerioan 
history, we are deeply indebted to Mr, Bonsai's book. A pleasant, old-fashioned 
narrative history of the military and social asDects of French aid in the American 
Revolution. 

Cohn, David L. Combustion on wheels, an informal history of the automobile ag° ; 
3v 1944 BIA 

The book is highly technical, but lightened by a very Dersonal handling of the early 
d°ys of orejudice and dislike and humorous cracks at devil wagons; the pioneering 
done by country doctors in the interest of the low-priced car; the first races; 
Fenry Ford and other trail blazers. One section of the book traces the revolution 
in American life, brought about by the automobile. The credits and debits are duly 
charted. Cohn knows his American scene thoroughly, and this is an excellent vehi- 
cle for his gifts. 

Fair, A. A. Bats fly at dusk. 2v 1942 BIA 
An exceotionally clever olot, much lusty humor - and Bertha Cool, saltiest of female 
sleuths . 

Haycox, Ernest. Canyon passage. 3v 1945 BIA 
Excellent fiction - vivid, comoact and unaffected as to style; swift, satisfying and 
unhackneyed in nlot . A western story. 

Crutch, Josenh Wood, Samuel Johnson. 7v 1944 APH 
All in all, this is the book for which we have long been waiting. This is the com- 
nlfte story of Dr. Johnson — the man, the talker, the moralist, and the critic — 
written with shrewd insight and understanding, with grace and wit. It will not 
suonl^nt Boswell; but it will send most readers back to Boswell and to Johnson's own 
works with increased aooreciation and delight. And doing that, it will have effect- 
ively accomplished its author's oumose. 

Santayana, George. The middle span; persons and places. 2v 1945 APH 
Continuation of the author's story of his life begun in "Persons and Places." This 
volume covers his years of study in Germany, his early visits to England--the coun- 
try he loved best, his various returns to Spain in his young manhood, and his 
thirty years as teacher at Harvard. n »The Middle Span* is written T&th the self- 
satisfaction of egotism and the cool breeze of serenity. It is also written with 
a command of English which would be preeminent at any time. One can only surmise 
when the notes for it were first begun; I suggest that some of these cages are the 
distillation of work begun twenty years ago« It is the exaltation of the orivato 
life, the classic isolation of the ivory tower." Edward Weeks in the "Atlantic 
Monthly » M 












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Stewart, George R. Names on the land; a historical account of nlace-naming in 
the TTnited States. 4v 1945 APH 

A history of American oleoe names, which is filled with facts, anecdotes, conjectures. 
It narrates the explorations of the Spanish, Dutch, French, and English settlers, and 
registers the names they left in their wake. Historical, social, literary, and 
linguistic points of view all are considered. "Names on the Land" is a real con- 
tribution to our understanding and appreciation of our local, regional and national 
heritage. It is also extraordinarily good reading. 

Van Druten, John. I remember mama; a play in two acts. 8v ARC Duplicated 
Play based on "Fame's Bank Account" by Kathryn Forbes. It is the portrayal of the 
activities of a Norwegian-American family living in San Francisco. The thesis which 
Mama proves (how to be hapny though poor) is not exactly novel--and the solutions of 
some of the family's dilemmas are more amusing than believable. 

Yost, Edna. Formal lives for the disabled. 3v 1944 BIA 
Presents techniques to be used by the "handicapped" individual; by family and friends; 
by oeoole and agencies whose job is rehabilitation! bv business and industry, which 
must furnish most of the necessary jobs, and by the public, which must understand and 
co-ooerate. This book should be read and re-read by every disabled person and by 
every oerson, professional or otherwise, who, as friend or counselor, wants to assist 
them. To the new worker especially, it will be a "Bible." It is to be hoped it will 
find its way into every hospital library and every doctor's waiting room. 



Talking Books 
(These books are provided by the U.S. Government unless otherwise noted) 



Pellamann, Henry. Victoria Grandolet. 16r 1944 Reed by Livingston Gilbert APH 
An egocentric, middle-class New England girl marries into an old Louisiana family, 
bound inescapably by tradition. The story, what there is of it, concerns not so much 
Victoria's relation to her husband end his people as the intensity of her feeling 
toward their fabulous ancestral home and the dead-and-gone Grandolets who have lived 
there . 

Promfield, Louis. Pleasant valley. 22r. 1945 Read by Eugene Earl AFB 
In this book which is in part made up of autobiographical reminiscence, in Dart 
exposition of his theories of farming and farm life, a noted American writer relates 
how, after many years spent abroad, he returned to his native Ohio, and there built 
un a new home and a new way of life founded on the old ways of the nioneer American 
farmer. The book achieves as a whole, a constructive expression of one American's 
positive faith in a permanent American agriculture based on a satisfying rural life. 

Front line 1940-41; the official story of the civil defense of Britain; issued 
by the Ministry of Information, llr FIB Read by Patric Curwen 
This is the story of Britain through the days of its supreme test by the German 
Luftwaffe, when 190,000 bombs were drooped on it, when more than 40,000 men, women, 
and children were killed, and when countless nameless heroes fought through the 
world's first great battle of Civilian Defense to preserve a nation's existence. 
Preface. 

The various types of blitz which the Germans have attempted are described; firs' , 
the attempt to wipe out London, preparatory to invasion; second, to cause confusion 
and suffering, end to weaken morale; next, to destroy industrial and shipping center- 
one by one; end finally, nuisance raids, which the English have learned to handle wit] 
astonishing effectiveness. 

Kendrick, Beynerd. Death knell. 12r 1945 Read by House Jameson AFB 
A detective story. Less finicking readers should like this chronicle. Suspicion is 
tossed around nioely and, bar part of the solution, will give one a pleasant enough 
t-"xi hours . 
























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Lardner, Ring. Ring Lardner's best Btories. 2 pts. 35r 1938 Read by Burt 
Blackwell APW 

An American humorist and short story writer, Lardner was for many years a sports 
writer and used a raoy sports idiom, which he made famous. In his later works, he 
was under "the SDell of the misspelled" and "the line of the illiterate." 

Ratcliff, J.D. Yellow magic; the story of penicillin. 7r 1945 Reed by Dick 
Crowley APF 

"Characterized by Dr. Keefer, himself intimately associated with the clinical trials 
of this wonderful drug, as a unique example of collaborative efforts — scientific, 
industrial, end administrative — penicillin does indeed justify the name Mr. Eatcliff 
has given it — yellow magic. He has carefully traced its history through the research 
of the men who have struggled with it. It is a dramatic story beginning with the 
discoveries of Alexander Fleming in England when he found a mold that destroyed cer- 
tain microbes, through the work of Dubos, Rammelkamo, and others until with a 'second 
era of chemotherapy in full swing. ' Dr. Florey and his group saw penicillin eccomp- 
lish in the body of a hum^n being what it had accomplished in test tubes and mice." 
Scientific Book Club Review. 

Wright, Richard. Black boy; a record of childhood and youth. 3v 1945 APE 
Richard Wright, 36, is generally accounted the most gifted living American Negro 
writer. His new book makes it clearer that he has one of the most notable gifts in 
TT .S. -writing, black or white; a narrative style- that is simole, direct, almost com- 
pletely without Dretense or decoration, but never flat. 

"One rises from the reading of such a book with mixed thoughts. Richard Wright 
uses vigorous and straightforward English; often there is real beauty in his words, 
even ■'"'hen they are mingled with sadism. Yet at the result, one is baffled. Evidently 
if this is an actual record, bad as the world is, such concentrated meanness, filth 
and desDair never completely filled it or any particular part of it. But if the book 
meent to be a creative picture and a warning, even then, it misses its oossible 
effectiveness because it is a work of art so potently and terribly overdrawn." W.E. P . 
DuBois. (Mr. DuBois, of Negro descent, is a leader of his race). 

Hand-cooied Books 

This is a list of the hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated these books are in Grade lg-. 

How to locate hand-cooied books in libraries: Following each title in this list you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blind end indicate the library in which you 
will find the book. A key to these abbreviations , giving the names and address of 
each library, end also of publishing houses, is included in every June and January 
issue • 



Allee, Marjorie Hill. The house. 3 V 1944 NYPL 
Merritt Lane returns to the University of Chicago for further study and joins a 
groun of young men and women living in a co-operative house. Their troubles begin 
when thev plan to admit a Chinese girl to the house. For older girls. 

Burgess, Perry. Who walk alone, 6v NLB, WYPL 
This story is one of heroic courage under tragic conditions told with amazing sin- 
ceritv end restraint. Written in the first person and based on facts, the book tells 
of en American ex-soldier who finds, nine years after his return from the philjooiji^a, 
th°t he has leorosy. It is an insoiring and beautiful story. 

Chandler, Raymond. Farewell, my lovely. 4v Grade 2 NY^L 
Detective story. The real thing in wickedness and the best herd-boiled mystery in 
ages. 



5. 



Eastman, Nicholson J. Expectant motherhood. 3v 1940 NYPL 
An obstetrician at John Hopkins explains the course of pregnancy, diet and hygiene, 
danger signals, the birth of the baby, convalescence from childbirth, and core of 
the newborn baby. 

Edmonds, W. D. Wilderness clearing. 2v NYPL 
A novel of young love in American pioneer days. The scene is the Mohawk Valley; the 
time is 1777. For junior and senior high schools. 

Franck, F. A. Roaming in Hawaii; a narrativeof months of wandering among the 
glamorous islands that may become our 49th state. 8v LC 

Franken, Rose. Another Claudia. 3v Grade 2 Chicago, LC 

Gregory, Jackson. Man to man. 5v LC Fiction 

Farkness, Ruth. Pangoan diary. 3v Grade 2 History 

Hancock, L. A. Student nurse. 4v NLP , Sacramento 

u ennessey, D. L. Twenty-five lessons in citizenship. 3v 

locking, W. E. What man can make of man. lv LC 

Personality development; mind and background 



Punter, E. B. 



Fiction 

LC, Sacramento 

2v Grade 2 Cleve- 



land. 



Hunter, E. B. Personality development; voice and expression. 2v Grade 2 Cleve- 
land. 

Jesse, F. T. The saga of "Sam Demetrio." lv Grade 2 Cleveland 
T'imbrough, Emily. We followed our hearts to Hollywood. 2v Grade 2 LC 
Lewis, Edwin. Practice of the Christian life. 4v NLB 
Lewis, H. S. Mental poisoning, lv Grade 2 Sacramento Psychology 
Link, H. C. The rediscovery of man. 4v LC, Cincinnati 
Loomis, Frederic. The bond between us. 4v LC, Sacramento 
McEride, Wary Margaret. America for me. 2v Cleveland, LC 
Oliver, Simeon, Son of the smoky sea. 3v Grade 2 LC 
Parrott, K.U. Storm at dusk. 2v Grade 2 LC Fiction 
Porter, Alyene . Papa was a preacher . 3v 1944 * TV PL 
Reminiscences of a childhood soent as one of the younger members of a large family, 
living in a series of Methodist parsonages, under the strict but kindly rule of e 
preacher-father. 

Priestley, J.B. Albert goes through, lv Grade 2 Chicago, LC 
Regan, W. M. Concentrate mixtures for dairy cows. lv Sacramento 
Reid, C. F. Overseas America; our territorial outDosts. 2v Grade 2 Cle velend 
Sandburg, Carl. The oeoole, yes. 4v Grade 2 LC Poem 

Saroyan, William. The human comedy. 4v Grade 2 Chicago, LC (Available as 
Talking Book) 

Shepherd, Eric. Murder in a nunnery. 3v Cincinnati, LC, Indianapolis 
Spence, ^artzell. Get thee behind me; my life as a preacher's son. 6v LC 
Stefansson, Evelyn. Fere is Alaska. 2v Grade 2 Cleveland 
Tenney, TT .K. Let's talk about your baby. 2v LC 
Warner, Anna B. Gardening by myself. 2v 1924 NYPL 



WFY NOT SAY "THANK YOU"? 
Harold Rowley 

What do you do when you finish reading s hand-cooied braille book? Do you iust 
bundle it up and send it back to the library? That's what most of us do, I'm afraid. 

But if you have really enjoyed reading the book, if it has given you information 
that you have wanted for a long time, why don't you say "thank you" to the parson who 
transcribed it into braille? Each month "The braille Eook Review" carries lists of 
nil the press-made and all the hand-cooied books that "'ere out into braille during 
the previous month. Usually the list of hand-coniod books is longer than the list of 
press-made ones. Can you imagine how many hours of work were required to copy all of 






























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press-made ones. Can you imagine how many hours of work were required to codv sll of 
these books by hand just so that more books will be made available to the blind than 
the United States government can suonly? 

The great majority of hand transcribers get not a single cent for their work. 
Men and women from coast to coast spend a few hours each day. at their transcribing, 
hours in which they could be gainfully employed; but somehow they find greater com- 
pensation in the work they are doing. But if you would like to compensate a hand- 
transcriber further, you can do it just by dropping him (or, and frequently, her) a 
nenny oostal card saying that the book which he made available to you in braille was 
enjoyed. Recently a woman in Wisconsin told me that in all the many years she has 
been transcribing books into braille, only one person has ever written her to thank 
her and tell her how much he enjoyed a book which she did. She said that one oostal 
card sort of paid off for all the work and time she has given to transcribing. 

TT sually the title oage of a hand-copied book gives the name of it s transcriber 
^nd enough of an address so that a card or letter would be delivered. Next time you 
enjoy a hand-cooied book, why don't you make use of this information on the title 
oage? The chances are very good that you'll be glad you said thank you. -^nd it 
will give somebody way across the country a real "lifV. 

THE COMING CONVECTION 

Perkins awaits with anticipation the convention of the American Association of 
Instructors of the Blind to be held here June 24-28. This was originally olanned 
for 1942, but was given up because of the war; and olans are now being made to make 
this a oost-wer gathering of imoortance and value. Many delegates from schools 
throughout the country are expected to attend, and Perkins wishes to assure them 
of traditional Few England hosoitality. Since many may want to stay beyond the 
four days of the convention, arrangements are being made so that some of the cottages 
will be onen for a oeriod after the convention to give visitors an opportunity to 
remain here while sight-seeing in New England. 

Instead of having the convention members divided up into small cottage groups, 
arrangements have been made to serve oil of the meals in theadjoining Lower School 
Poll and Gymnasium. In this way, there will be the value of group assembly and the 
usual festivities which go on at convention meal time. A feature of interest will 
be the fact that half of the floor of Symnhony Fall has been secured for the Pods 
Concert on Thursday night, June 27. Attending the Poos with a orogram by members of 
the Poston Symnhony Orchestra is considered one of the experiences which visitors to 
M ew England should not miss. 

LISTS OF TALFING POOFS ISSFED BY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

Inkorint lists of "Talking Books for the Blind Placed in Distributing Libraries, 
July 1943-June 1944" are available uoon request from your nearest distributing 
librarv or from the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., if the suonly in your 
nearest library is exhausted. 

This list of talking books for the adult blind includes over 100 titles with 
a brief descriptive note on each title. 



A POET 0" TFE TEACHING OF POETRY 
Taken in part from Leonora Soeyer's article in "The Saturday Review 

of Literature" 



A learned man, Sir Herbert Grierson, once said to me, "There is too much talking 
about ooetry. Poetry suffers from the mere approach of orose; the more it is 






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7. 



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discussed, the more it is robbed of its magic," adding mournfully, "end no one, 
probably, has talked about it more than I have." And yet, it must be talked about, 
thought about, and disoussed, if we are to read it with true understanding end de- 
light, and oertainly if we are to write it or teach it. For it is an art, and like 
all arts, it must be learned. 

I am sometimes asked, "What - can you teach poetry?" My answer to that is that 
I cannot teach the student talent, but should he have the gift, "through Grace" as 
John Masefield says, it must be developed - the art must be learned. 

The actual process of poetry-writingt the infinite devices; the treditions; the 
immense variety of words; in fact, the English language; this can indeed be, must be, 
learned. ""That Alice 1Vi eynell calls "The Lows of Verse*" 

"Dear Laws, be wings to me J 
The feather merely floats, be it heard 
Through weight of life - the skylark's gravity - 
That I am not a feather, but a bird! 

Learn the Lawsi Onco mastered, 'free yourself from their too trammelling in- 
fluences, by all means; stray from them as often as you please, but know where to 
stray and howl Of course, you can teach and learn poetry; Yeats studied all his life. 
I advised a friend, "You ought to work over that poem, perhaps rewrite it entirely." 
"I know," he replied rather dolefully, "but I might be writing a new poem while I was 
mulling over this one." I believe in "mulling over"a poem; Edwin Arlington Robinson 
once told me it had taken him three years to get a certain sonnet into shape. Robert 
Frost declared to a class, " I am not a teacher, but an awakoner." 

It is eight years since I was suddenly called to the telephone by Audrey 
Wurdemann, Joseph Auslander's wife. Joe lay with a broken leg. Would I take charge 
of his poetry class at Columbia ffor the rest of the semester? Little- did I foresee 
what that small if intimidating, act of service to a friend would mean in my lifei 
For Joseph, healed and nimble again, betook himself shortly to the library of Congress, 
and I, more or less, inherited the poetry class* And iecidedly, I found that one could 
"teach poetry." 

"Fow do I conduct my poet's workshop" is another question that I am frequently 
asked. The workshop really seems to conduct itself, together with the active co- 
operation of student and teacher - and that magic other thing, the "bequest of wings," 
as only Emily Dickinson could n^me the study of verse. The poems of my students are 
first read, marked, learned, and inwardly digested by me; then read aloud and discuss- 
ed in class. To quote Siegfried Sassoon, "Without clarified construction and techni- 
cal control, no poetical communication can be effective." 

The Laws of VerseJ And after the laws are fairly mastered, if they ever are, 
what then? If nothing else, a clearer and happier sense of what verse really is; ^nd 
why. The reception of the more equipped surges forward, but the humbler will never- 
theleso be the richer in understanding; the poetry-lover will love it the more, 
accenting in time the mournful fact that poetry-writing is not for him or her. He 
will sense, a little wistfully perhaps, why the sonnet he is reading is the imperish- 
able thing it is;he has studied verse-writingj he has written sonnets himself. 

Nor is it necessary in my olass, to bring a poem (or a sheaf of poems) each week- 
although the students usually do. I urge a rewritten, better written poem in prefer- 
ence to the newer one. I recommend the "mulling over;" and I tell my listeners of a 
remark of Padraic Colum T s» "Do not let your poem walk too soon on the page, lest it 
get bandy legs." There are too many bowlegged poems running about. 

>Tor, when I pronounce n poem "good," does it signify that it is re^dy for the 
editorial staff of a leading magazine. It only means that it is excellent class work 
and that I may occasionally ask for a copy "to keep." This is considered a distinct- 
ion. The workshop is a lighthearted and slightly unpredictable little group, though 
none the less earnest and diligent. 











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"The architecture of verse, " as Louis Untermeyer cells it, is studied and stress- 
ed j rhyme and its many variations? the French and Italian forms, end how they ere used 
in English. "Death to the adjectivel" cried Robert Louis Stevenson, meaning, of course, 
its over-use, one of the more blatant faults of the inexperienced writer. "Nouns end 
verbs ere almost pure metal," is the wise comment of Marie Gilchrist; "Adjectives are 
of cheaper ore," she adds. (And adverbs, I insist, that adjective of the verb.) But 
the adjective can be "pure metal" too, and I recall few* Yeat's "man's own resinous 
heart," Dorothy Wellesley's donkey's "immoderate ears," Keat's "alien corn", Marvell's 

"curious peach." 

There is so much to talk about in the workshop - punctuation and grammar becomes 

impassioned; spelling seoms a graceful thing that has naught to do with pedantry or 

dogma, surely, I often bring a new poet to class - I mean, his "slender volume," or a 

forgotten, too long-neglected poet. Or I bring an anthology for a brief glimpse into 

the hearts of a group of poets. 

I believe in anthologies, although I know they provide but a glimpse. And we reed 
■''ne published letters of poets, always absorbing, often revealing as regards their own 
v^rse; and sometimes I bring witty and edifying reviews, and books of poetic criticism 
"•ritten by brilliant contemporary memnd women of letters. 

I urge my class to read more verse both classic and modern; I believe they do 
read some of the books we have nibbled at together - and I tell them of one exceedingly 
prolific young n-oet, who remarked loftily that "he hadn't time to read - he wrote;" 
having admitted that he did not recall the author of "Dover Beach," which had somehovr 
loomed into the conversation. "I write," he repeated - that being his contribution 
to literature. "So did the other fellow," was the succinct comment of a nondescript 
little man standing by» 

The obscure versus the profound; clarity as opposed to common sense! Aristotle 
said it, so long ago - but I refrain from quoting his superb summing up of this 
highly controversial topic, seething among the poets of his far day, as in ours. 

And the class writes its poems; sometimes really writesi I do not praise inordir- 
ately, but I do not think that too severe comment is good teaching. 

""That is this impelling thing, this force, that is bringing so many hundreds of 
returning service men to classes in English? They flock to Columbia. They have in- 
vaded my workshop; I have two workshops now. They "started writing," these young 
men tell me, at the front; in the jungles; on the beaches; during the night watches 
on ships; in hospitals* A great deal of what they bring me is only emotional release, 
what I call "private poems." But some of it is more. Occasionally I find among the 
welter of words a true flame. These men were writing about something they were living, 
and I 3m glad to be close to it. And how serenely they take my criticism - they do not 
seem to mind. They know what they are writing about and what they want to sey. Cne 
Seebee, after a dressing down, looked at me with positive admiration. "Gee," he re- 
marked, as if to himself, "that's swell." And I was curiously abashed; he had lived 
the poem, whereas I could only suggest how he might tell it a little more glibly. 

And I remember a story of a poet friend - she had been reading some rather 
mediocre verses, but had been too kind to the quivering young author at her side» 
"I couldn't tell him," she whispered to me in a corner, "it would be like stepping on 
a kitten," 

But these kittens are very tough, yet resilient. I have never felt a bone give 
way? their nine lives are all of nine in the olassroom. They can take it. And profit 
by it. And so, it occurs to me, can !• 












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9. 



MATW1N DALY 
Taken in pert from "Current Biography" 

Maureen Dely was a nationally known short story writer at sixteen, a syndicated 
columnist at twenty, and a best-selling novelist at twenty-one. She has made her 
reputation by simply putting down in fiction from her own recent memories of teen- 
age hopes, experiences, and frustrations. 

The third of four daughters, Maureen Patricia Daly was born to Joseph Desmond 
and Mq r gp r Qt Mellon Dely on March 15, 1921. Her birthplace is Castlecauf ield, County 
Tyrone, in Ulster, but when she was two years old her family m»ved from Ireland to 
the TT n ited States, where they made their home in the small town of Fond du Lac, 
Wisconsin. Maureen attended the public grade sohool and St. Mary's Sorings Academy 
there, ^er childhood was "pretty routine," to quote Miss Daly, and her mother was 
very striot. "No one I knew or any member of my family took much interest in 
writing," she says, but an English teacher enoouraged her. When she began writing 
stories, Miss Daly has revealed, "it was not ambition but inhibition" that spurred 
her on: "I suffered from a permanent state of 'cat got yoM* tongue,' wore my heir in 
a long braid twisted around my head, and was what is commonly known in Fond du Lac 
and surrounding oounties as 'a complete drip,' The truth is, I just didn't date... 
end sort of droooed around at dances, no one dancing with me." 

Maureen's story "Fifteen," a simple episode which happened 8nd was written when 
she was that age, won fourth place in "Scholastic" magazine's national short story 
contest for high school students -that year. She wrote "Sixteen" in March 1937, while 
waiting for a telephone call that never came j "It wasn't meant to be a short story 
at all, but rather I just wanted to get the experience down »n paper to relieve the 
tense, hurt feelings inside of me." "Sixteen" was entered in the enrual "Scholastic" 
comDetition that year and won first prize. Harry Hansen chose it for reprinting in 
the "0. Henry Collection of the B es t Short Stories for 1938," making Maureen the 
youngest author ever to be representedin that well-known annual. 

Her nest story, rather pretentious, was rejected by "Red Book", On the advice 
of T\>ro + -hv Canfield Fisher, Maureen then went back to writing about what she knew 
most. In 1941 she submitted the first fifty pages of her novel "Seventee:.th Summer" 
in the national intercollegiate comDetition for the first Dodd, Mead Intercollegiate 
Literary Fellowship. This fragment was the unanimous choice of the judges for th? 
twelve -hundred dollar advance against royalities, which made it possible for a 
beginning writer to complete a first novel* "When you get older," the twenty-one- 
year-old author said, "I believe you lose accuracy in remembering all the funny 
quirks and sadnesses and happiness you go through in adolescence. It is a wonderful 
and a very important time. It is still so much a part of me I feel that I can write 
of it with truth and sympathy. 

Her thrice-weekly column for teen-agers, "On the Solid Side," started in 1941, 
and wps later syndicated to more than a dozen newsoapers. Hundreds of letters a 
month came to the columnist, asking for advice. A collection of these articles, 
titled "Smarter and Smoother," was published in 1944 and had gone into its ninth 
orinting by July 1945. "Parents should be thankful to Maureen Daly," wrote review- 
er Virginia T 'irkus, "for she gives all the advice and counsel that teen-agers 
think is sermonizing from parents, but that they'll lap up in this form." The 
"Library Journal's" critic thought that "with slang end cliche^ it often °poears 
strained and self-conscious," but May Lamberton Becker called "Smarter and Smoother" 
"the best book, all things considered, on our high school manners and ethics and 
their relations to those of later life, among many lately offered to the teens. 
One special advantage is the author's time of life; just old enough to look beck on 
the teens, she h n s, as a novelist, already developed mature sympathy that lets her 
see them unolouded by the scorn the twenties often feel." 

Miss ^ly, is five feet six inches tall and weighs one hundred and twenty-five 
pounds. Despite a rather prominent nose, the blue-eyed brunette is described as 
very pretty. In politics she is a Democrat, in faith a Roman Catholic, and her 



10. 



favorite recreations are swimming, skating, and dancing. "I still remember the 
first boy with whom I ever had a date," Miss D^ly hos told her sub-deb readers. 
"He was a tall blond fellow who worked for Te stern Union - ^nd I've lik r :d tell 
blond bovs ever since. I've always liked to read a lot and can almost recite G.K. 
Ch:sterton and Thomas Wolfe backward. 



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Volume 15 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIOT 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

June 1946 



Number 6 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U.S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy A. Goldthwaite 
American Foundntion for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



> 



Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 
Hand-copied Books 

Progress Report on the Social 

Security Aot by Robert B. Irwin 

The Jewish Braille Review Competition 



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Prize ""Tinners in the Fifth Literary 

Competition of the Jewish Breille Review 



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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, June, 1946 

Book Announcements 
Press-made Books 



All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Government. 

Copies of these government-supplied books are placed in the twenty-seven regional 

libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in the 

January and June numbers of the magazine* 

Readers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of 

Congress to serve their respective territories* 

In the list vihioh follows, the first book notation in every instance should be credited 

to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given. 

Aiken, Conrad, editor. A comprehensive antholegy of American poetry. 6v 1929, 
1944 APF 

Attempts to include in one volume specimens of American peetry from Anne B re d3treet 
to Marianne Moore. It illustrates the various purposes whioh a good anthology may 
serve j it gives the reader an opportunity to see modern peetry against the background 
of the past; it calls to the attention certain forgotten writers? it brings together 
contemporary poems that most of us would otherwise fail to see. 

Black, W, H. Feeding cattle for beef. (U.S. Department of Agriculture Farmers' 
Bulletin, no. 1549.) Revised April 1940 lv APH 

Black, W, F., and E. W. McComas. Beef production en the farm. (U.S. Department 
of Agriculture Farmers' Bulletin, no. 1592) Revised April 1940 lv APF 

Irwin, Margaret. Young Bess. 3v 1945 BMP 
Fistorioal novel based on the ohildhoed and young womsnhood ©f Elizabeth Tudor, later 
Queen of England. The time oovered is from Elizabeth's twelfth year to the death of 
her brother, Edward VI, in 1553. 

Fendriok, Baynard. Lights out. 3v 1945 BIA 
The creator of the blind detective, Dunoan Maclain, hss here written a different kind 
of novel, the story of e young American soldier, blinded in Italy, and his fight to 
achieve 8 normal, hapny existence. (Available as a Talking Book) 

Lookridge, Richard, and G. H. Estebrooks. Death in the mind. 3v 1945 CPE 
Spy story describing the machinations of the Nazis in this country in 1942. A wave 
of treachery in high plaees brings two young British secret service agents to this 
country where they unoover a particularly fiendish device. (Available as a Talking 
Book) 

The reality of man; excerpts from writings of Baha'u'llah and 'Abdul'1-Baha. lv 
BIA (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Richardson, H»B. Patients have families. 5v 1945 APR 
This book is based in large part on the family study conducted co-operatively by the 
faculties of publio health, medicine, end psychiatry, of Cornell University Medicsl 
College, the Wew York Fospital, and its Sooial Service Department, and the family 
servioe end department of educational nursing of the Community Service Society. The 
comprehensive project sought a better understanding of the family as e unit in medicfl 
core and the implications for treatment. Dr. Richardson tells in non-technical 
language of characteristic family patterns that appear in connection with different 
illnesses, and indicates their significance to the physician in diagnosis and treat- 
ment. Re demonstrates the advantages of pooling the various services of the hospital 
end of the community to get a complete picture of the patient and his family, °nd 
shows how such co-operation can improve medical practice and enrich medical education. 

Sheets, E. W, The beef calf, its growth ond development. (U.S. DeDartment of 
Agriculture Farmers* Bulletin no. 1335.) Revised December 1944 lv APH 



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(The so books are provided by the U.S. Government unless otherwise noted) 



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Arne, Sigrid. United nations primer, the key to the conferences. 16r 1945 
Read bv Paul c lark APH 

Briaf discussions of the various international conferences and meetings which took 
place during the war years, includes full texts of important documents. Contents! 
The Atlantic charter; the United Nations declarations? Casablanca j The Food confer- 
ence; The first Quebec conference; Moscow; The United Nations relief conference; 
Cairo; Tehran; The Ilo meeting; Bretton Woods; The second Quebec conference; The 
aviation conference; Yalta; The San Francisco conference. (Available in braille) 

Brown, Harry, A walk in the sun. 9r 1944 Read by Horace Braham AFB 
An American platoon, landing on the beaoh in Italy, loses its lieutenant, and then, 
in fairly quick succession, three sergeants. Finally, a corporal takes over and 
leads the men toward vaguely sensed objective - a farmhouse six miles inland - end 
there they accomplish the mission they were sent to perform. (Available in braille) 

Cary, Lucian. The duke steps out. 13r 1929 Read by William Lazor AFB 
A rollicking talo of a prize fighter who aspires to culture and social position. Whet 
hapnens to him in love and in the ring makes this a dashing, flashing story* 

Chase, Mary Ellen. The Bible and the common reader. 2 pts 23r 1944 Read by 
Alexander Soourby AFB 

An interpretation of the Scriptures as literature end as history, written for the 
common reader. The King James version is the basis of the disoussion. Miss Chase 
reveals dearly end refreshingly, as no one ever has done, the profound depths of 
human interest and the glorious literature of the Bible. As its title suggests, she 
wrote it, not for the theologian or the scholar, but for the general reader. A 
delightful adventure in literature. 

Diete, David. Atomic energy in the ooming era* ltr 1945 Read by Livingston 
Gilbert APH 

Author, a trained science editir and noted journalist, tells in an interesting, vivid 
style the dramatic story of the atomic b«mb. The modus operandi of the bomb is 
withheld. Mr. Diets traces the background of atomic energy and relates the researches 
sf brilliant scientists and grouped industrialists who developed the nuclear bomb 
under the auspices of our government, advancing science 50 years. He cites military 
potentialities and possibilities of future employment of atomio energy for human 
needs. 

Forester, C, S. Commodore Hornblower*. 21r 1945 Read by Harold Young AFB 
In this fourth book about the English sea captain, Horatift Hornblower, after a short 
stay on land, returns to the sea with the rank of Commodore. He is entrusted with 
the delicate mission of swinging Sweden and Russia to the side of Britain in the 
Napoleonic wars. He suoceeds, after battle, intrigue, and treachery in his own ranks 
(Available in braille) 

Graham, Gwethalyn. Earth and high heaven. 19r 1944 Read by John Knight. AFB 
^ tender, moving love story that sets out a ohallenge to prejudice. Its central 
drama concerns a young woman journalist and a soldier about to go overseas. They 
fall deedy in love, but there ia a serious obstaole to their marriage. Miss Grahsm 
gives us vivid glimpses of social and professional life in Montreal. Her character- 
izations ere lively and convincing, the portrait of the sensitive her© being 
especially well done. (Available in braille) 

Harris, Foster. The basic formulas of fiction. lOr 1944 Read bv Jean Clos 
\?F 

This is a book for beginners in the art of writing salable fiction. It is the 
book you need if you are at a loss as to where or how to start, or if you do not 
know what is the matter with your fiction writing efforts. It tells you in the 
simplest possible terms just what a story is; how to shape your own stories correc+1" 
how to create characters and fit them to stories; and, above all, how to plot. The 



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author is e fiction writer and teaoher of writing techniques who, for a dozen years, 
has contributed to some two score national magazines. 

Joyce, James. Dubliners; introduction by Padraic Colum* 17r 1914 Reed by 
Weil Fitzgerald AFB 

Short stories written about 1904, but never published until 1914, owing to the squeam- 
ishness of the publishers. Joyce has aroused a storm of praise m d of abuse by his 
writings. His influence upon other writers has been tremendous* He and Dorothy 
Richardson developed the "Stream of consciousness" novel bv which the conscious end 
unoonscious life of his characters is laid bare. Joyce died in February, 1941. 

Lockridge, Richard, and G. H. Estabrooks* Death in the mind. 15r 1945 Read 
by George Patterson APH 

Spy story describing the machinations of the Nazis in this country in 1942. A wave 
of treachery in high places brings two young British secret service agents to this 
country, where they unoover a particularly fiendish device. (Available in braille) 

Rinehert, Mary Roberts. The yellow room* 18r 1945 Read by George Patterson 
APF 

Every mystery author, even the best, should study "The Yellow Room" for a style 
I polished but not slick, for sentiment as opposed to sentimentality, to watoh the oare 

in building to a climax and the quick twist of ideas which ever avoids an ensuing 
anticlimax* Every mystery fan will read "The Yellow Room." 

Sharp, Margery. Cluny Brown. 14r 1944 Read by Brenda Forbes AFB 
Cluny (short for Clover) Brown was a plumber's niece given to exploring by-oaths be- 
yond her own station in life. She is as exhilarating as a l«ng refreshing drink 
soiked with the spirit that cheers. With the raffish gaiety that is her own special 
gift, Miss Sharp has produced a charaoter who is blood sister to all the lovable 
women who achieve distinction by the guile lessness with which they pursue their self- 
appointed course. Miss Sharp's characterization of Cluny is as joyous a bit of por- 
traiture as has ever graced a smiling page* She is equally delightful in portraying 
the people among whom Cluny moves in her awkward, long-limbed gait* 

Wallace, Lew. Ben Huri a tale of the Christ. 2 pts 41r first published in 
1880 Read by George Walsh APH 

Syria in the time of Christ, The story as a whole covers a l«ng period, but the main 
| episodes are supposed to occur A.D. 23 onwards at Anti*eh, etc. Full of dramatic 

situations, at the same time closely following "orthodox" interpretation where New 
Testament scenes are introduced* 

Wolfert, Ira. American guerrilla in the Philippines* 15r 1945 Read by William 
Lazar AFB 

The hero of this true story is Lieutenant L. D. Richardson, USNR, who was exeoutive 
officer to Lieutenant Kelly of the "expendables." When all the PT b»ats were destroys 
Richardson, with ten AAF pilots tried to sail a native boat to Australia, but they 
were shipwrecked. On Leyte again he joined the guerrilla band, worked under Colonel 
Ruperto Kangleon, helped keep MacArthur informed by radio, and was one of the first 
men the general asked to see when he came back to Leyte* 

Hand-copied Books 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless other- 
wise indicated these books are in Grade la* 

Fow to l(5oate hand-cooied books in libraries! Following each title in this list you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of a city* These ere abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the library in which you 
will find the book* A key to these abbreviations, giving the nemes and address of 
each library, and also of publishing houses, in included in every June and January 
issue* 



Alme din gen< Martha von. Frossia* 8v 1941 LC 



























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The period is that grim phase of the Russian re-volution when people starved and 
suffered and stood in lines in cities, when oountry sections were swept by plague 
and famine* Frossia is one of them, and this is the story of her struggle for s\m»»- 
vival. 

Ashton, Helen. Yeoman's hospital. 5v 1945 NYPL 
Twenty-four hours in the life of a provinoial English hospital in Deoember, 1943, 
forms the basis of this novel. Dootors, nurses, patients, hospital routine, and 
something of the history of the hospital and the surrounding country all enter into 
the novel. 

Barton, Betsey. And now to live again* 2v Grade 2 N.Y. Guild, *FYPL 
Ten years ago, when the author was sixteen, her back was broken and her legs paralysed 
in an automobile accident. In this book she describes her own way back to normal 
life, and given practical hints for rehabilitation of others so afflicted. H e r per- 
sonal philosophy and faith, which has helped her to face life, crops uo throughout 
the book* 

Binns, Archie. The land is bright. 7v 1945 LC 
The trek over the Oregon trail in the 1850' s, the theme of this novel* is woven into 
a story through the romance «tf a girl from Iowa and a boy from Kentucky. 

Blixen, K ar€TU (isak Dinesen, pseudonym) Winter's tales. 5v 1942 LC Fiction 

Bontemos, Arna, oomoiler. Golden slipners, an anthology of Negro poetry for 
young readers. 2v 1941 LC 
Brief biographies of the poets are included. 

Bottome, Phyllis. The heart of a child. 2v 1940 LC 
The time is the fall of 1918; the place, a tiny mountain village in the Tyrol. A 
simple and touching story, put into the mind of a child, which oonoerns the rebirth 
of love and security at Christmas after the end of the war* 

Brower, CD. and others. Fifty years below zero; a lifetime adventure in the 
far north. 6v 1942 LC 

Life story of an unusual character who spent 57 years at home with the Eskimos in 
northern Alaska. Early chapters deal with primitive adventure, whaling, trapoing, 
trading, mastering the arts of native life. Later chapters relate the snge of polar 
exploration by air. Style is simple; it is a book of haopenings, not introspection, 
and is a contribution to polar literature. 

Feur, Leon E. Jewish literature since the Bible, book 1. 3v 1937 LC 

Follett, Halen. Ocean outposts. 2v LC 
An aocount of a leisurely, unconventional tour of Polynesia, describes these Pacific 
islands more fully in a book suitable both for older children and adults. It is a 
combination of fact and legend about such islands as the Hawaiian Islands, the step- 
ping-stone islands to the Philippines, the islands on the route from Hawaii to 
Australia and New Zealand, and the Samosns. 

Foote, J. T. Jing. Iv LC Fiotion 

Fox, Emmet. Sermon on the mount. 3v NYPL, ARC, NLB 

Gould, John. Prenatal care for fathers. Iv 1941 LC 
This non-medical, non-technical, non-scientific explamfeon of the masculine side of 
the matter is consistently funny, but not so muoh so as to interfere with sense; it 
speaks as one man to another, but a woman listening in will laugh and generally agree! 

Halsey, Margaret. Some of my best friends are soldiers, a kind of novel* 3v 
1944 LC Fiotion 

A series of letters from Gretchen and her brother, Jeff, now in the army. She tries 
to bully him out of his grief for his dead wife, and is successful; she ettaoks him 
on his attitude toward the southern feeling about ^egroes; and through her work at 
the canteen, reflects her own development in combating prejudice among the Governing 
Board. 

Hill, F. F. and F. A. Harper. Have we food enough for all? Iv 1944 LC 
(Public Affairs Pamphlet No* 89) 






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Ingham, Travis. Rendezvous by submarine; the story of Charles Parsons and the 
guerrilla soldiers in the Philippines . 3v Grade 3 NYPL 

One of the most thrilling stories to oome out of the war is this account of the 
planning and exeoution of guerrilla warfare in the jpfcilipnines by a f»rmer resident 
of the island and member of the United States Armed Forces. 

Jacoby, Oswald, Oswald Jacoby on poker. 2v Grade 2 N.Y. Guild 
Information on how to play the game. 

Law* Analytical case digests in constitutional law. 7v LC 

Law» Analytical oase digests in conveyances. 5v LC 

Lawi Analytical case digests, corporations. 6v LC 

Mclntire, Ross T. The unconquerable spirit, lv NLB 

Mann, Thomas. Stories of three decades* 12v Grad.3 2 N.Y. Guild 
Contents » Little Herr Friedemann; Disillusionment; Dilettante; Tobias Mindernickel ; 
Little Lizzy; Wardrobe; Way to the churchyard; Tonie KrOger; Tristan; Hungry; Infant 
prodigy; Gladius dei; Florenza; Gleam; At the prophet *s; Wenry hour; Blood of the 
Walsungs; Railway accident; Fight between Jappe and Don Escobar; Felix Krull; De^th 
\ in Venice; Man and his dog; Disorder and early sorrow; Marie and the magician* 

Ogburn, W. F. War, bobies, and the future, lv 1943 LC 

Pine, Hester. Beer for the kitten. 5v LC, NLB 

Stewart, M.S. The Beveridge plan, lv 1943 LC 
The nuthor is editor of "Public Affairs Committee" and associate editor of the "Natic*-. 
Simnle, understandable language oombined with clarity of thought. 

Stewart, M«S. How can we nay .for the war? (Public Affairs Pamphlet #74) lv 
1942 LC 

Stewart, M.S. The Smiths and their wartime budgets* (Public Affairs Pamphlet 
#88) lv 1944 LC 

Stewart, M.S. When I get out, will I find a job? (Public Affairs Pamphlet #86) 
lv 1943 LC 

Torrey, Volte. You and your Congress. 5v 1944 Chicago 
An account of how we govern ourselves with emphasis an our weaknesses* The last Dart 
of the botfk is concerned with what we oan do to elect better men to Congress and 

J thereby improve our government. 
Van Dyke, Henry. Ruling passion; tales of nature and human nature. 3v Grade 2 
N. Y. Guild, Chioago, NYPL 

Contents: Lover of music; Reward of virtue; Brave heart; Gentle life; Friend of 
justice; Wood magic; Year of nobility; Keeper of the light. 

Wannamaker, Olin D. Rudolf Steinerj an introduction to his life and thought. 
lv Grade 2 1941 NYPL Steiner (1861-1925) was a German philosopher and occultist* 

Watson, Helen Orr. Trooper; U. S. army dog. 4v NLB 

Wilhelm, D. G. Your son and ten fighting generals; also Your son and six fight- 
ing admirals* lv 1944 LC 

Winston, Robert. Dive bomber. 3v 1939 LC 

Witt, Peter. Abraham Lincoln, man of sorrow, lv Grade 2 Cleveland 

Wolfert, Ira. Torpedo 8; the story of Swede Larson's bomber squadron. 2v Gr°d 
2 Cleveland, *\Y. Guild 

Story of the Amerioan bomber squadron which, after the disaster of Midway (five of it 
six planes were lost) took for its motto, "Attack and Vengeance." This book, by tha 
author of "Battle for the Solomons," tells how Swede Larson f s men lived up to th<-:ir 
motto • 

bright, Mrs, Helena R, Sex factor in marriage; a book for those who are about 
to be married, lv Grade 2 Cleveland* 















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PROGRESS REPORT ON THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT 

by 

Robert B. Irwin 

The Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives of Congress held 
hearings on Title X of the Social Security Aot on May 9 and 10. It was very gratify- 
ing to note that on these two days there was practically no difference of opinion 
among the witnesses testifying regarding the desirability of retaining this Title in 
the Act. With but one or two exceptions the witnesses testifying were blind* 

They strongly urged that Title X be retained in the Social Security Act and that 
it be liberalized along the following lines « 

1* That sufficient income and earnings be exempted from consideration as re- 
sources to enoourage blind people to heln themselves and friends and non- 
legally responsible relatives to extend assistance to them. 
2* That in calculating need, due allowanoe be made for the special expenses 
resulting from blindness. 

3. That the states be given a rather free hand in determining who should have 
assistance • 

4. That the ceiling on Federal reimbursement range from 50 per cent to 75 per 
cent of expenditures, depending upon the per capita income of the states. 

Some of the witnesses also requested that if the Federal government adopts a 
polioy of reimbursing tho states with part of the. cost of welfare work to prevent 
people from becoming needy, as is contemplated in the Forand bill, F.R. 5686, similar 
grants be extended to state agencies- for the blind to cnrry on their welfare work for 
the blind. A strong plea was made by witnesses that the states be Dermitted to place 
the administration of blind assistance in any department of the state government which 
the state chooses. Congressman Forand of Rhode Island expressed a personal interest 
in the blind because of blindness in his own family, and said that if there was any 
vagueness regarding the retention of special assistonce to the blind in his bill, 
F.R. 5686, which has caused so much alarm among the blind, he would do what he could 
to clear it up. 

On the whole I feel that the Ways and T'eans Committee has been impressed with 
the concern which blind neople have shown regarding the retention of Title X i n the 
Social Security Act and its liberalization. It will be several weeks before the 
Committee issues its report and introduces a bill expressing its conclusions as to 
just whet should be done about nssistnnoe to the blind. You should wntch for news 
on this subject in "Talking Book Topics" and "Outlook for the Blind." 

If you would like a copy of the offioial report of the hearings on Title X, is 
bv the Committee, the Americnn Foundation for the Blind will try to obtain one for 
you. At least a copy of my statement which I submitted to the Committee can be ser 
you if you desire it. 

THE JEWISH BRAILLE REVIEW SIXTH INTERNATIONAL LITERARY COMPETITION 



"The Jewish Braille Review" has the privilege of announcing its sixth annua? 
literary competition for the blind of all faiths. The contest is open to writer 
the United States, the British Commonwealth of Nations, Latin America, France an 
French-speaking oountries, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The ooi 
tition will consist of two senarate projects i (a) Po3try; (b) Prose. 

POETRYt The contest <mts for prizes in poetry may write on subjects of th 
choosing in any of the smaller forms. No ooem should exceed 32 lines nor fell 
the sonnet in length. Two poems may be entered by any one contestant. (Open 
United States and the British Commonwealth only.) 






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PROGRESS REPORT OW THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT 

by 

Robert B. Irwin 



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2. 



4. 



The Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Renresentati-ves of Congress held 
hearings on Title X of the Social Security Aot on May 9 and 10. It was very gratify- 
ing to note that on these two days there was practically no difference of opinion 
among the witnesses testifying regarding the desirability of retaining this Title in 
the Act. With but one or two excentions the witnesses testifying were blind* 

They strongly urged that Title X be retained in the Social Security Act and that 
it be liberalized along the following lines t 

1. That sufficient income and earnings be exempted from consideration as re- 
sources to encourage blind people to heln themselves and friends and non- 
legally responsible relatives to extend assistance to them. 
That in calculating need, due allowanoe be made for the special expenses 
resulting from blindness. 

That the states be given a rather free hand in determining who should have 
assistance. 

That the ceiling on Federal reimbursement range from 50 per cent to 75 per 
cent of expenditures, depending upon the per capita income of the states. 
Some of the witnesses also requested that if the Federal government adopts a 
policy of reimbursing the states with pert of the. cost of welfare work to prevent 
people from becoming needy, as is contemplated in the Forand bill, H.R. 5686, similar 
grants be extended to state agencies- for the blind to carry on their welf°re work for 
the blind. A strong plea was made by witnesses that the states be Dermitted to place 
the administration of blind assistance in any department of the state government which 
the state chooses. Congressman Forand of Rhode Island expressed a personal interest 
in the blind because of blindness in his own family, and said that if there was any 
vagueness regarding the retention of special assistonoe to the blind in his bill, 
F.R. 5686, which has caused so much alarm among the blind, he would do what he could 
to clear it up. 

On the whole I feel that the Ways and Teans Committee has been impressed with 
the concern which blind neople have shown regarding the retention of Title ^ in the 
Social Security Act and its liberalization. It will be several weeks before the 
Committee issues its report and introduces a bill expressing its conclusions as to 
just what should be done about assistance to the blind. You should wntch for news 
on this subject in "Talking Book Topics" and "Outlook for the Blind." 

If you would like a cony of the offioinl report of the hearings on Title X, issu: 
bv the Committee, the American Foundation for the Blind will try to obtain one for 
you. At least a copy of my statement which I submitted to the Committee can be sent 
you if you desire it. 



THE JEWISH BRAILLE REVIEW SIXTH INTERNATIONAL LITERARY COMPETITION 



"The Jewish Braille Review" has the privilege of announcing its sixth annual 
literary competition for the blind of all faiths. The contest is open to writers of 
the United States, the British Commonwealth of Nations, Latin America, France and «11 
French-speaking oountries, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The compe- 
tition will consist of two senarate projects! (a) Poatry; (b) Prose. 

POETRYt The contestants for prizes in poetry may write on subjects of their owr 
choosing in any of the smaller forms. No ooem should exceed 32 lines nor fall below 
the sonnet in length. Two poems may be entered by any one contestant. (Open to the 
United States and the British Commonwealth only.) 



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PROSEi The assignment in this section consists of a short story containing 
from 2000 to 3000 words. (Ooen to the United States, the British Commonwealth and 
Latin America only.) 

FRENCH A* T D RUSSIAN SECTIOWs This assignment will be an essay on "My Adjustment 
to Blindness." The phase of adjustment treated may be either (a) blindness at birth 
or soon after; (b) blindness in early childhood; (c) in adolescence ; (d) in adult 
I'.fe before the age of 40; (e) in the decade after 40; (f) the double handicap « 
blindness end deafness; (g) war blindness. 

PRIZES: Awards of $25, $15, and $10 will be given as first, second and third 
prizes in each of the three separata nrojects and in all of the four language sections. 
Duplicate second and third prir.es will be given to contestants for poems, short stor- 
ies and essays of sufficient merit to deserve suoh consideration . As in previous yeers, 
oiilv one Helen Keller Gold Modal for Literary Excellence will be awarded to the 
Exiglish section of the competition. This year it will be given to the first prize 
winner in poetry. The Helen Keller Medal will also be awarded to first prize winners 
for manuscripts in French, Russian, and Spanish (or Portuguese). 

The announcement of the final awards will be made in an early 1947 issue of "The 
Jewish Braille Roview, " as well as in all other leading braille publications in this 
country and abroad* 

Rules of the competition may be obtained by writing to The Jewish Braille Review 
Literary Competition, P.O. Box 36, Morris Heights Station, New York 53, New York. 



PRIZE TEWERS OF 
THE JEWISH BRAILLE REVIEW FIFTH INTERNATIONAL LITERARY COMPETITION 

The judges of this Fifth International Literary Competition were as follows i 
Dorothy Brewster, Professor of English, Columbia University, New York* Konrad Beroovici 
playwright, author of "Main Entrance", "Manhattan Sideshow"; Beynard Kendrick, teacher, 
author of "Lights Out"; John Holmes, poet, Professor at Tufts College, Boston; Ted 
Malone, poet, radio commentator on books and poetry; David McCord, author, drama critic 
for"Boston Evening Transcript"; Concha Romera James, Chief, Division of Intellectual 
Co-operation, Pan American Union, Washington, D. C. 



Poetry First Prize 
Second Prize 
Duplicate Seoond 
Duplicate Seoond 
Third Prize 
Duplicate Third 
Duplicate Third 
Duplicate Third 
Fonorable Mention 
Honorable Mention 
Honorable Mention 
Favorable Mention 
Favorable Mention 



Earl Howard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 
Albertina Eastman, Watertown, Massachusetts* 
Richard Kinney, East Sparta, Ohio. 
Bertha Johnston, Middlesex, England. 
Emily J. Penn, Lancaster, England. 
Vincent L. Laridaen, Mauston, Wisconsin 
Rachel W, Jacoby, Los Angeles, California. 
Harold Rowley, Hastings, Michigan. 
Alfred H. Robinson, Brighouse, England. 
Edward C, Joseph, Quebec, Canada. 
Wilbur Sheron, Morion, Indiana. 
R. J. Vine, London, England. 
Laota Lohr, Ipava, Illinois. 



Prose First Prizei Helen Keller Gold Model for Literary Excellence 

Elsie Cowan, Denver, Colorado. 
R. J. Vine, London, England. 
Edward C. Joseph, Quebec, Canada. 
Ruth Brown, Meriden, Connecticut. 
Thomas H. Halton, Kent, England. 
Harold Rowley, Hastings, Michigan* 
Essie J. Thornburgh, Nashville, Tennessee. 



Seoond Prize 
Third Prize 
Duplioate Third 
Honorable Mention 
Honorable Mention 
Favorable Mention 



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Spanish Section* 

Third Prize 
Honorable Mention 

Favorable Mention 



Liliana Echeverria, Drummond, Santiago, Chile 
Isabel Orfilia Martinez, El Salvador, Central 

America. 
Emilia Saaverdra Almeida, Santiago, Chile. 



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LIST OP LIBRARIES GIVING TERRITOPY SERVED BY EACH 

Editor '8 notet For the benefit of new subscribers this list of libraries and 
also the list of abbreviations which follow are given regularly in the January and 
June issues* 



I 



Albany 

Atlanta 

Austin 
Canada 

Chicago 
Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 
Denver 

Detroit 

Fairbault 

Honolulu 

Indianapolis 

Jacksonville 

JBL 

LC 

Los Angeles 
New Orle ans 

NLB 

New York Guild 

NYPL 



Oklahoma 
Per kin 8 



Philadelphia 



New York State Library, Library for the Blind » New York State 
other than Greater New York City and Long Island? Vermont 
Kriegshaber Memorial Library for the Blind: Georgia; Alabama; 
Florida 

Texas State Library, Library for the Blind: Texas 
Canadian National Institute Library, 64 Baldwin Street, Toronto; 
Canada 

Chicago Public Library, Department of Books for the Blind, 4 536-44 
Lincoln Avenue, Illinois: Northern half of Illinois from a line 
north of Springfield, Wisconsin 

Cincinnati Library Society for the Blind, 6990 Hamilton Avenue, 
Mount Healthy, Ohio: Southern half of Ohio from a line south of 
Columbus; Kentucky; Tennessee 

Cleveland Public Library, Library for the Blind, Ohio: Northern 
half of Ohio from a line including Columbus 
Columbus Public Library, Library for the Blind, Ohio; Ohio 
Denver Public Library, Books for the Blind, Colorado; Colorado; New 
Mexico; Nebraska 

Wayne County Library, 3661 Trumbull Avenue, Detroit, Michigan; Wayne 
County, Michigan 

Minnesota Braille and Sight-Saving School, Library for the Blind: 
Minnesota; North Dakota; South Dakota 

Library of Hawaii, Books for the Blind: Hawaiian Islands 
Indiana State Library, Service for the Blind: Indiana 
Illinois Free Circulating Library for the Blind, Illinois School for 
the Blind: Southern half of Illinois from a line including Spring- 
field; Iowa 

Jewish Braille Library, 1846 Harrison Avenue, New York 53, New York; 
Nation-wide service 

Library of Congress. Services for the Blind, Washington, D.C: 
District of Columbia; Virginia; Maryland; South Carolina 
Los Angeles Lending Library, California: California; Arizona 
New Orleans Public Library, Library for the Blind, Louisiana; 
Louisiana; Mississiopi 

National Library for the Blind, 112 6 - 21 Street, N.W., Washington, 
D.C.t District of Columbia; Virginia; Maryland; North Carolina 
New York Guild for the Jewish Blind, 1880 Broadway, New York, New 
York: Nation-wide service. 

New York Public Library, Library for the Blind, 137 West 25 Street, 
New York 1, New York? Greater New York City and Long Island; 
Connecticut; Puerto Rico; Virgin Islands 

Oklahoma Library Commission, Oklahoma City: Oklahoma; Arkansas 
Perkins Institution Library, Wptertown 72, Massachusetts: For 
Talking Book Service, Massachusetts; Now Hampshire; Maine; Rhode 
Island. For embossed books, all of New England 

Free Library of Philadelphia, Library for the Blind, Logan Square, 
Philadelphia 3, Pennsylvania; Eastern half of Pennsylvania from a 
line beginning with Harrisburg; New Jersey; Delaware 






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Pittsburgh Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Library for the Blind, Pennsylvania r 

Western half of Pennsylvania from a line west of Hprrisburg; West 

Virginia 
Portland Library Association of Portland, 801 West Tenth Avenue, Oregon i 

Oregon? Idaho 

California State Library, Library for the Blindi California? Nevada 

Michigan State Library for the Blind; All of Michigan outside of 

Wayne County 

Salt Lake City Public Library, Library for the Blind, Ut^h: Utahf 

Wyoming 

^fenry L. Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, 3844 Olive Street, 

St. Louis, Missouri: Missouri; Kansas 
Students* Library Amerioan Printing House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Avenue, 






Sacramento 
Saginaw 

Salt Lake City 

Stt Louis 



APF 



AFB 

APF 
ARC 
BIA 

CPH 

HMP 
*IB 

TBA 



Louisville 6, Kentucky* Students in all states 

List of Other Abbreviations Used in This Magazine 

Amerioan Foundation for the Blind, 15 West 16 Street, 

New York 11, New York 

American Printing House for the Blind 

Amerioan Red Cross, National Headquarters, Washington, D. C. 

Braille Institute of America, 741 North Vermont Avenue, 

Los Angeles, California 

Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, Mt* Healthy, Ohio 

Howe Memorial Press, 549 East Fourth Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

National Institute for the Blind, 224 Great Portland Street, 

London, W, 1, England 

Theosoohicel Book Association for the Blind, 184 South Oxford 

Avenue, Los Angeles, California 



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Volume 15 



BRAILLE BOOF REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

July 1946 



Number 7 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and in Mimeographed Form 

by the 

American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 

15 West 16 Street 

New York 11, N.Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U.S. Government 

Through the Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy A. Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



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Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 
Hand-copied Books 

Dashiell Hammett. From "Twentieth 
Centurv authors" 



Edna Ferber. From "Twentieth 
Century Authors" 

New York State Federation for Workers for 
the Blind 



Bookt on Radio: A List 

How to Put Words or Paper, by 
Robert G. Berkelman. From the 
"Saturday Review of Literature" 



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BRAILLE BOOK RT3VI*T7, July, 1946 

Book Announcements 
Press-made Books 



1 



All press-made or Talking Books here noted ere provided by the Federal Government* 
Cooies of these government-supolied books are placed in the twenty-seven regional 
libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries eppeara regularly in the 
January and June numbers of the magazine * 
Readers a**e required to borrow hnnV« &**»» *- u ~ ijj— lesignated by the Library of 



21 r. 



very instance should be credited 
n« 



4v 1945 BIA 



Bontemps, Arna 

They seek a city; read by Kermit Murdoek. 

c. 1945 AFB fl^j Xj^Stf) 

This study of negro ^^^^f ^^5^ cSlsTogth and HM during a period of 
and west during a period of more than a century cull & ^^ ^ iohhc . roto . 

ether a ^ood d^of xnterestxng »«teri. ^/^ ers . It begin3 with the fligbt 

has been scattered in books, P£P^£ antebellum Railroad, and enda with the 

It begins with the flight of slaves "em and Dixon Une , 

south via the underground railroad, and enas wi™ 

recent movements to industrial centers beyond the Mason ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

and Dixon line, felted Nationa in Asia will 

and other Asiatic countries do 
.alistic system. The great 
i and co-operate in helping 
mited nations* Mr. Lsttimore, 
__ j-xig, CTiwrpxiwr, outlines specific political and economic oolicies which he- 
believes the United States should follow in Asia, 

Ratoliff , J.D. Yellow magic; the story of penicillin* lv 1945 HMP 
"Characterized by Dr, Keefer, himself intimately associated with the clinical trials 
of this wonderful drug, as a unique examole of collaborative efforts - scientific, 
industrial, and administrative - penicillin does indeed justify the name Mr. Ratcliff 
has given it - yellow magic. He has carefully trsoed its history through the research 
of the men who have struggled with it. It is a dramatic story beginning with the 
discoveries of Alexander Fleming in England where he found e mold that destroyed cer- 
tain microbes, through the work of Dubos, Rammelkamp, and others until with 'a second 
era of chemotherapy in full swing, 1 Dr. Florey and his group sew penicillin accomplish 
in the body of a human being what it had accomplished in test tubes and mien*" 
Scientific Book Club Review (Available as a Talking Book) 



u/OWt 



Talking Books 
(These books are provided by tho U,S* Government unless otherwise noted) 

Binger, Carl. The doctor*s job, 16r 1945 Read by the author and John Knight AFP 
An informal, but authoritative account of tho changes which have taken place in ^edi- 
oine during the last few decades, and a study of the influence of psychoanalysis in 
osychiatry and in medicine. The author is a graduate of Harvard Medical School, 
served with the Rookefeller Institute f<jr Medical Research, and is now on the faculty 
of the Cornell Medical College, ^Vhat is uncommon and refreshing about his book is tho 
extent to which he has pondered and digested the findings of psychoanalysis, psychiatry 
end psychosomatic medicine* 

Cohn, David L» Combustion on wheels; en informal history of the automobile ago, 
18r 1944 Read bv Kermit Murdook AFB 
This book traoes Amerioan social history from the days of the first horseless carriages 






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2. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVI^, July, 1946 

Book Announcements 
Press-made Books 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Government* 

Conies of these government-supolied books are placed in the twenty-seven regional 

libraries -which serve tho blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in the 

January and June numbers of the magazine. 

Readers are required to borrow books from the library designated by the Library of 

Congress to serve their respective territories. 

In the list which follow, the first book notation in every instance should be oredi-fed 

to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given* 

Bontemps, A. *?. , and Jack Conroy. They seek a city. 4v 1945 BIA 
This study of negro migration from the South to the North and ^Test during a poriod of 
more than a century culls together a good deal of interesting material whioh hereto- 
fore has been soattered in books, pnmohlets and newspapers. It begins with the flight 
of slaves from the antebellum South via the Underground Railroad, and ends with the 
recent movements to industrial centers beyond the Mason and Dixon Line. 

Lattimore, Owen. Solution in Asia. 2v 1945 BMP 
Enlightening disoussion of increasingly important role of Asia in any plans for a 
peaceful world. Success or failure on the part of the United Nations in Asia will 
direotly effect results in Europe and elsewhere. China and other Asiatic, countries do 
not intend once again to become the victims of an imperialistic system. The great 
powers must understand this drive toward self-expression and co-operste in helping 
these countries to beoome abiding allies in a world of united nations. Mr. Lsttimore, 
in his concluding ohapter, outlines specific political and economic oolicies whioh he 
believes the United States should follow in Asia. 

Ratoliff, J.D. Yellow magic; the story of penicillin, lv 1945 HMP 
"Characterized by Dr. Xeefer, himself intimately associated with the clinical trials 
of this wonderful drug, as a unique examnle of collaborative efforts - scientific, 
industrial, and administrative - penicillin does indeed justify the name Mr. Ratcliff 
hfls given it - yellow magic. He has carefully traced its history through the research 
of the men who have struggled with it. It is a dramatic story beginning with the 
discoveries of Alexander Fleming in England where he found e mold that destroyed cer- 
tain microbes, through the work of Dubos, Rarnmelkamp, and others until with T a second 
era of chemotherapy in full swing, 1 Dr. Florey and his group saw penicillin accomplish 
in the body of a human being what it had accomplished in test tubes and mice." 
Scientific Book Club Review (Available as a Talking Book) 



Talking Books 
(These books are provided by tho U.S. Government unless otherwise noted) 

Binger, Carl. The doctor's job. 16r 1945 Read by the author pnd John Fnirht AFB 
An informal, but authoritative account of the changes which have tak«n place in medi- 
cine during the last few deoades, and a study of the influence of psychoanalysis in 
Dsychiatry and in medicine. The author is a graduate of Harvard Medical School, 
served with the Rookefeller Institute f<jr Medical Research, and is now on the faculty 
of the Cornell Medical College, ^at is uncommon and refreshing about his bcok is tho 
extent to whioh he has pondered and digested the findings of psychoanalysis, psychiatry 
btkJ psychosomatic medicine. 

Conn, David L» Combustion on wheels; an informal history of the automobile ago. 
18r 1944 Read bv Kermit Murdook AFB 
This book traoes Amerioan social history from the days of the first horseless carriages 















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to January 30, 1942, when the last Chevrolet came off the assembly line. (Available 
In braille) 

Cronin, A. J. The citadel. 2 pta 29r 1937 Read by John Brewster AFE 
Story of the career of a conscientious, brilliant young doctor, from his start in a 
mining town in 1 Valas, to the realization of his ambition for a London practice. A 
restrained, but scathing expose of certain aspects of the British medical profession 
which mak-es a moving and absorbing novel. (Available in braille) 

Golcoerg, Isaac* George Gershwin. 16r 1931 Read by Alexander Scourby AFB 
The author of "Tin Pan Alloy" has written this enthusiastic account of the career of 
Broadway 1 s favorite composer, a man who has made "an honest woman out of jazz." ThiB 
is a discussion of Gershwin's personality, of his song successes in oollnborat ion with 
his lyric-writing brother and his relation to the development of jazz, (available in 
braille) 

Harrison, Norman B. Fis bequest. 3r Braille Circulating Library, 203 N. 
Jefferson St., Richmond, Va. APH (Not a publication of the IT. S. Government) 

Johnson, Osn. Bride in the Solomons. 18r 1944 Read by Inge Adams AFB 
Description of an extended honeymoon spent in the jungles of the Solomon islands some 
thirty years ago. Osa Johnson was the bride and she and her husband, Martin Johnson, 
were attempting to got motion pictures of a cannibal feast. Their experiences at 
Tulngi, on the oennibal island of Malaitn, and other islands in the New Hebrides and 
the Solomons are described in detail. (Available in braille) 

Kendrick, Baynard. Blind man<a bluff. 12r 1943 Read by House Jameson AFB 
"Detective story in which Maclain, a blind detective, carries on as convincingly and 
brilliantly as in previous stories (Available in braillo) 

MoConkey, J. H., and A. R. Jeoson. Other devotional messages. 3r APH 
(Not a publication of the U*S. Government) 

McCraw, Louise Harrison. Not all that glitters. lOr APH (Not a publication of 
the U.S. Government) 

Peterson, Houston. Huxley, prophet of science. 22r 1932 Revised 1946 Read by 
Fenneth Meeker APH 
J Huxley stalked through his age with fire in his eye and chips on his shoulder, ready 
to do battle with anyone who would for a moment interfere with the sacred oeuse of 
science* He is o power over us today. His scientific discoveries, interpretation of 
evolution, his agnostic dilemmas, ore still passing our thought and complicating our 
lives. Huxley has a considerable foroe because he happened to be a literary genius as 
well as a biologist. This book is an attempt to picture Huxley in his ubiquitous role 
--a creator and destroyer in his own age, as in ours. He is presented as a symbol 
and symptom of fifty years that we are now beginning to look on with more understonding 
than was proper a decade ago. (Available in braille) 

Pieroo, Robinson. It was not my own idea. 6r 1944 Read by Eugene Earl AFB 
The author had been blind for many years. In this small book of reminiscences he 
describes his readjustments to life after he became blind, his methods of living as 
independently as possible, and some of the experiences , both grave and gay, which he 
encountered in his efforts to make a living. Something should be s n id of Mr. Pierce's 
style, which is easy and colloquial, yet terse, sinewy, and without an ounoe of padding. 
And something should be said of his philosophy. For there is a wisdom as well as 
sound sense and entertainment of an unusual sort in this little book. He who spends 
an evening with it will be well rewarded, (available in braille) 



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Hand-copied Books 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated these books are in Grade lg. 

Wow to locate hand-oooied books in libraries: Following each title in this list you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. Thesa are abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the library in which you 
will find the book. A key to these abbreviations, giving the nemos and address of 
each library, and also of publishing houses, is included in every June and January 
issue. 



Adelman, G. S. Nothing serious. 2v Chicago 

Alassios, Alison B. Round the Mulberry Fill. 2v 1939 NYPL 
A story of a little girl's life on a farm and how she learns to take her place in its 
activities. Older neoole enjoy it for its atmosphere and children for the story. 

Aahton, Helen, pseudonym. Joanna. 4v Chicago 

Bottome, Phyllis. Level crossing. 4v LC Fiction 

Boyd, Neva. Handbook of games. 5v 1945 NLB 

Bromfield, Louis, Whet became of Anns Bolton. 5v LC, Philadelphia 
In 1937 the fabulously rich Anna Bolton, the beautiful widow of an eccentric American, 
was considered one of the most accomplished hostesses in Europe. People knew very 
little about Anna's background, but she had money enough to buy the blackest sables 
and the most magnificent emeralds in Europe, so she was accepted. Dave Sorrell, 
foreign correspondent of the Times, knew Anna f s background, for he had gone to school 
with her in Ohio, when she was Annie Scanlon, from the wrong side of the railroad 
tracks. This is Dave's story of Anna's rise to fame and riches, and her regeneration 
during the war. 

Carmichael, Amy. Fohila. 4v Braille Circulating Library, 203 N. Jefferson St., 
Richmond, Va. 

Crump, Irving. Our United States Secret Service; how the agents of the Treasury 
Department carry on war against counterfeiters. 4v Chicago 

Damon, Bertha. A sense of humus . 4v LC 
Humorous account of life on e New Hampshire farm with observations upon the behavior 
of flowers, vegetables, animals, and hired men. (Available as Talking Book) 

Davidson, Bill. Tall tales they tell in the service, lv Chicago 

Davis, G. T. B. When the fire fell. 2v Richmond, Va . 

Dobbie A very present help. 2v Richmond, Va . 

Duffy, J.J. Music for strings, lv 194G A book of verse by a well-known blind 
musician. 

Fioher, Louis. Empire, lv Chicago 

Fielding, W. J, Sex and the love life. 5v Grade 2 N. Y. Guild 

Ford, Corey, pseudonym. Short out to Tokyo; the battle for the Aleutians. 2v 
Chioago 

Forgy, H. M. And pass the ammunition; edited by J, S. McDowell. 
An account of the heroic deeds of the men of the heavy cruiser U.S.S. 
in its combat servioe following Pearl Harbor. 

Hadar, Berta and Elmer. Spuukey lv Chioago 
Story of a Shetland pony. 

Fall, J. N. Lost island. 3v 1944 Chicago, LC 
In the summer of 1942 on American engineer is sent to a tiny South Sen island to make 
preliminary plans for en airfield in advance of the coming of the Seabees. The story 
concerns chiefly his feelings as he realizes what the coming of war and industrial 
civilization will mean to the inhabitants, native and white. 

Hatch, Alden. General Ike, a biography of Dwight D. Eisenhower. 4v Gr^de 2 
1945 NYPL 

Semi -fict ionized biography, an adult book whioh is timely and suitable for older boys 
and girls as well. 



4v Chioago 

"Now Orleans" 









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Hooker, R. W« Ship^s doctor. Chicago 

Fuokel, Oliver. Parsifal, lv Grade 2 N.Yi Guild 

Irwin, ""Till, and T.M. Johnson. What you should know about spies and saboteurs. 
3v Chicago 

Much of the information dates back to the first World Warj there is probably as much 
data as it is possible to publish about the work of Nazi and Japanese agents in 
recent years. 

Josephs, Ray. Argentine diary* ?v Grade 2 1944 N#Y« Guild 
A daily record kept during the year 1943, of Argentina's internal politics and inter- 
national relationships, as viewed by a North American newspaper correspondent. 

Krehbiel, Henry E. How to listen to music. 5v M LB 
To help those without technical training to some understanding of musical forms, aria, 
and means of expression. The author's easy and readable style makes this the most 
popular book as it is also the oldest in the field. 

Xrueger, J.J, Baseball's greatest drama. 9v Chicago 

Maoauley, C.B.P. The helicopters are coming. 3v 1944 NYPL 
A oopular book on helicopters, designed to toll the layman something of the facts 
concerning this "offshoot of the aeroplane," and to answer the question how soon it 
will come into general use. 

McCutcheon, R. G. Hymns in the lives of men. 3v Grade 2 1945 NYPL 

Maclean, C. M. The Tharrus three. 4v Chicago 
Story of three children evacuated from Edinburgh and Glasgow to Tharrus, a wooded farm 
on the Scottish Highlands. 

Mc Nichols, C. L. Crazy weather. 3v 1944 LC 
The action of this story takes place during the heat of an Arizona summer. A white 
boy runs away with his friend, an Indian boy, and together they travel through the 
"oheve country until the "crazy weather" heat has gone and South Boy goes back to his 
■white world. 

Morris, C. B. Flint. 8v LC 
A novel of San Francisco during the general strike of the *30*s, and of family life on 
Wob ^ill told through the fortunes of the Rutherford family, millionnaire shipowners. 

Saint Exuoery, Antoine de Terre des hommes. 3v NYPL By the author of the 
popular books, "Night Flight" and"Wind, Sand and Stars." Recommaided to beginners in 
French. 

Seghers, Anna. Transit. 5v Chicago 

Stone, H» A. Wrestling; intercollegiate and Olympic 4v Philadelphia 

Taylor, P. A. Going, going, gone; an Asey Meyo mystery. 4v SC Detective story. 

Thomas, Lowell J. Men of danger. 4v Chicago, LC 

Vaughan, Hilda, Pardon and peaoe. 4v 1943 LC 
In the summer of 1914 Mark Osborne and Flora Treowain met - only twice - and fell in 
love. Mark did not return to the lovely valley in Wales for six long years. "That 
happens after that makes an interesting story. 

Wannamaker, 0. D. Rudolf Steinerj an introduction to his life and thought, lv 
NYPL, Philadelphia 

Wright, Harold Bell. The re-creation of Briar Kent. 4v LC Fiction 



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DASHIELL HAMMETT 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

Dashiell Hammett, American founder of the hard-boiled" school of detective 
fiction, was born Samuel Dashiell Hammett , on the eastern shore of Maryland, the son 
of Richard Thomas Hiaamett and Annie Bond Hammett* The name "Dashiell" is of Frenoh 
origin and was originally M de Chiel"; Hammett says the chief characteristic of his de 
Chiel anocstors was that they fought in every war end never won. After the Baltimore 
Polytechnic Institute, which he left at 13, Hammett turned his hand to all sorts of 
occupations . He worked as a newsboy, freight olerk, railroad laborer, messenger boy, 
stevedore, and as advertising manager for a S 8 n Francisco .jeweler. Eight years of 
his life were spent as a Pinkerton detective, the experience that gave him ground 
for his later novels j among the celebrated cases with which he was connected were 
those of * T icky Arnstein and "fatty" Arbuckle, and he won his first promotion by oatch- 
ing a men who had stolen a f orris -nvheel. D UP i n g the First World Tar he served as a 
) sergeant with the Motor Ambulanoe Corps, and in consequenoe of his war experiences 
contracted tuberculosis (from which he later reoovered). After first trying a leave 
of absence, he was obliged to give up work as a detective and turned perforce to 
writing for a living. Previous to 1922 he had published nothing except some verse. 
The war injured his health, but it made him a writer, and it also gave him a wife, for 
in 1920 he married his hospital nurse, Josephine Annas Dolan # of Anaconda, Montana* 
They have two daughters • 

Hammett's first detective story (he had for some years been reviewing deteotive 
fiotion for the New York "Evening Post") was "Red Harvest" (1929), a loosely con- 
structed blood-and-thunder novel with more gangsterism than detection, even of his 
particular definition, in it. "The Dain Curse" marked an improvement in his method, 
and he reached his tenith with "The Maltese Falcon." Generally considered his greatest 
achievement, this novel holds an unusual distinction in being the only contemporary 
deteotive story to be "immortalized" by inclusion in the Modern Library. "The Glass 
Fey" wes regarded by critics as a worthy successor (and is Hammett's favorite among 
\ his own vrorks); but "The Thin Man," written with an apoarent eye toward mass soles, 
marked a softening and falling off in the author »s cowers, in the opinion of 
aficionados. This, however, did not prevent the story, with William Powell nnd Myrna 
Loy in the leading roles, from becoming a sensational Hollywood success - a better 
film, in the opinion of many, than it was a book. A series of cinematic sequels with 
the s«me actors have contributed to the author *s increasing finanoial independence* 

Hammett has written but little for publication in recent yenrs, spending most of 
his time on Hollywood payrolls. He is a night worker, vho starts in the small hours 
and works until daylight; sometimes, at a cruoial moment, he works on a book or pioturo 
36 hours at a stretch, A slender six-footer with a orest of prematurely gray heir and 
a small moustache, he might serve as the ohysicpl model for one of his own detectives. 
But he does not greatly admire his deteotive stories. What ho wants to do is write 
olays and "straight" novels. He admires Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, nnd Ben 
^eoht, all writers aa grim and swift-paoed in their fields as he is in his. In poetry 
his greet admiration is for Robinson Jeffers. 

Perhaps no other writer of detective fiotion in the oresmt generation has so 
changed and influenced the form as Hammett. ^n entirely new school of writing has 
grown un following the pattern he set. Few readers today will follow the "Bookman •a" 
exaggeration! "it is doubtful if even Ernest Hemingway has written more effective 
dlalbgudVbtit there ie no doubt of Hammett's real talent in this direction, 3S in 
his realistic portrayal of character. His detectives are all private agents drawn 
from real lifej brutal, grasping, lecherous "heels", but each with his own hard and 



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iistinot code. The action is ma chine#cun -paced and the events so violent that they 
sometimes threaten credibility. But for all their external speed end violence, 
Fammett's novels are among the best examples extsnt of tho blending of detection and 
the psychological study of character. His name will remain a mile-cost in detective 
lxterpture. 

Editor's notet Among this author's books the following are in braille. 

Creeps by Night Chioego 

The Glass Key 5v Sacromonto 

The Maltese Falcon 3v APH 

The Thin Man 2v CPF 



EDNA FERBER 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 



3 Edna Ferber, American novelist, was bora in Kalamazoo, Michigan, the daughter of 

Jacob Charles Ferber, a storekeeper, and Julia Ferber. Both her parents were Jewish, 
her father born in Hungary, her mother in Milwaukee. In her childhood they moved to 
Aonleton, Wisconsin, where she lived through her girlhood. Her father became blind, 
<=md she was obliged to give up her Ambition to study for the stage, and to take a job 
as reporter on the Appleton "Daily Crescent", at $3.00 a week. Previously she had 
never thought of writing. Her work attracted the attention of the editor of the Mil- 
waukee "Journal", who sent for her* she continued her newspaper work there and on the 
Chicago "Tribune". Meanwhile she had published a short story in "Everybody's Magazine" 
and written a novel which she did not like and threw it away. Her mother rescued it 
and sent it to a publisher, and in 1911 it came out as her first book, "Dawn O'Hare." 
Her first big success was as the author of a series of stories, later collected in 
several books, about a woman traveling "salesman" name Emma McChesney. She was grad- 
uated into the best seller class with "So Big", in 1924, followed by two other very 
popular novels, "Show Boat" (made into a musioal play, a movie, and a radio program) 
and "Cimarron", a story of the opening up of Oklahoma, also a big hit as a notion 
\ picture. She has also been most successful as a playwright, in collaboration with 

George S. Kaufman, their best known plays being "Dinner at Eight", "The Royal Family", 
"Serge Door", and "The Land is Bright". All those, except the last (1941), h^ve also 
"been filmed. Miss Ferber lives now in New York, with her mother. She hea never been 
mPTied. 

Edna Ferber is a tremendously vital Derson, who works hard and oloys hard. She 
does her work directly on the typewriter (as do most authors with newspaper training), 
nnd devotes all her mornings to writing, though she never seems to need seclusion or 
to be annoyed by interruptions. When she is working on a book, she sometimes SDends 
r few whirlwind days in the locole, interviewing its residents and gathering impres- 
sions; on other occasions, she relies entirely on memory or even reading, without ever 
having seen the place. She is short, with a large head covered with thick, crinkly 
dark hair, a pacer-white skin, and vivid dark eyes. Her speaking voice is low and 
huskey, with a dramatic quality. She is forthright, direct, energetic, and warm- 
hearted, tycically of the Middle "Vest in her outlook. 

Though she knows her books have been for tho most part escocist stories, writtor. 
in an escpist era, she yet feels that they contain a social message which readers 
have failed to catch. She says she has never written a book with which she was com- 
pletely satisfied. Grant Overton, who oointed out the zest and gusto which make 
her books such easy reading (and also sometimes mar them by evidence of haste and 
superficiality), nevertheless considered her "the keenest sooial critic among our 
fiction writers". William ^llen White said she is "the legitimate daughter of the 
Dickens dynasty", and added* "the historian will find no better cloture of America 



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in the first three decades of this century than Edna Ferber has drawn". Other critics 
have been far less enthusiastic, and when "Saratoga Trunk" was published in 1941, more 
than one reviewer noted that it was written ready-made for the movies, "lacking nothing 
but technicolor". 

Editor's notei Among this author's books the following are in braille or as 
Talking Books t 

American Beauty 5v ARC, NYPL 

Amerioan Beauty 15r APH 

Cimarron 8v Chicago, 1/3, NLB, Philadelphia, Salt Lake City 

Cimarron 2 Or AFB 

Come and Get It CPH 

Dawn O'Hara 6v N.Y. Guild, Sacramento 

Great Son 3v CPH 

Great Son 16r APH 

Nobody's in Town 2v Chioago, N.Y, Guild, Perkins 

A Peculiar Treasure 4v CPH 

A Peculiar Treasure 2 pts 29r AFB 

Roast Beef, Medium 4v Chicago, Sacramento, Albany 

Mother Knows Best 4v NYFL 

Saratoga Trunk 3v BIA 

Saratoga Trunk 20r APH 

Show Boat 2 Or AFB 

So Big 17r APH 



BOOKS ON RADIO 

Amerioan Radio Relay League, publisher. How to become a radio amateur, lv 1938 ARC 
«>»•«»» « , The radio amateur »s handbook. 7v 1935 ARC 
M " " " " • The radio amateur's license manual, lv 
1940, 1941 ARC 

Bosrslag, Karl. S.0.S» to the rescue? mth a preface by Felix Riesenberg. 3v 
) 1935 CPH 

Braille Radio News j a monthly magazine in Grade 1-g-, giving radio programs nnd 
radio news. 

Requests for this should be sent to the Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, 1ft • 
Perlthv, Ohio. 

Codel, Martin, editor. Radio and its future. 4v 1930 HMP 

McNsmee , Graham, and R. G. Anderson* You're on the airj with s preface by Heywood 
Broum. 3v NYPL, Seattle 

Stiening, Fred H. Make radio your hobby, lv 1940, 1941 APH 

'Vile, F.W. Emile Berliner, maker of the microphone* 2v BIA 

Yates, Raymond F. Machines over men. 2v CPH 



RADIO BROADCASTING 



Downes, Olin. Symphonic broadcasts. 4v 1932 NYPL 

Gielgud, Val. How to write broadcast plays; with three oxamnles. lv NIB 
Peet • All about broadonsting. lv 1942 APH 

Rolo, C. J. Radio goes to war, the "Fourth Front"; introduction by Johannes 
Steel, 4v 1940, 1942 BIA 

Schecter, A.A., and E. Anthony. I live on air. 2 pts 26r 1941 AFB 



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Sioussat, H. J. Mikes don't bite. 3v NYPL 

Whitaker-Wilson, Cecil. Writing for bradoasting* lv 19.35 edition NIB 

White, Antonia. B B C at war. lv 1942 NIB (Braille panda) 



NEW YORK STATE FEDERATION FOR DjORrSRS FOR THE BLIND 

The Board of Directors of the New York State Federation for the Blind are hapoy 
to announce that the first postwar meeting will be held at Albany, New York, during 
the latter part of Ootober. All members will be notified of the exact date by mail. 
Any oerson who desires to become a member should communicate with Mrs. Mary F. DeWitt, 
Blind Work Association, 18 Court Street, Binghamton, New York. Members with new 
addresses should send this information to this address. 



HOW TO PITT WORDS ON PAPER 
By Robert G. Berkelman 
From the "Saturday Review of Literature" 

Every reader, we have been assured, is a potential writer. Each of us has at 
least one book stirring within him. Very well, but how hail it forth? 

With little attempt at serious exhaustiveness, this essay, instead, offers snap- 
shots of flesh-and-blood writers caught in the mysterious act. If these candid pic- 
tures fail to stimulate masterpieces , it may be pointed out that neither do the more 
orthodox formulas evoke the true, the blushful Hippocreno. 

From what fount of the Muses, first, should the orosoective author imbibe? Well, 
as all cynics know, not a few men of the pen have also been men of the bottle-- 
Verlaine, Baudelaire, Swift, ^urns, Poe, E. A. Robinson. Charles Lamb was frequently 
befuddled. Richard Steele was often half drunk while portraying Sir Roger de Coverley, 
Before nips of brandy at the Cannibal Club, Swinburne, perhaps rendered by his epi- 
lepsy especially sensitive to stimulants, considered it good policy to pin his name 
and address on his lapel. Little wonder that many of his lines sing an intoxicated 
music and reel with abandon. Often Byron drank gin and water while writing. But 
most ooets, however muoh they might indulge otherwise, have remained on the wagon at 
least during the act of composition. 

Milton, with his insistence, upon "clear water in a beeohen cup, sober draughts 
from the pure soring", might well be acclaimed champion of the literary teetotalers. 
While composing, Shelley, likewise, relied solely upon tea and lemonade, until he was 
exhausted, ■when he occasionally resorted to loudunum. Oceans of tea were the chief 
liquid stimulant of ponderous Samuel Johnson and zestful William Hazlitt. At his 
protracted fits of work Balzac was sustained by innumerable cups of coffee. 

Opiates have played their sinister role. One of the strangest and most revealing 
(as well 8s most familiar) accounts of the relation between drugs 9nd writing is 
DeQuincey's "Confessions of an English Opium Eater"— "0 just, subtle, and mighty opium," 
that sent him down nightly into chasms and sunless abysses, that conjured up myriad- 
headed leering crocodiles and infinite cavalcades marching to dream music. Coleridge 
penned "Kubla Khan" after suoh a laudunum reverie, in which all the images and 
accompanying phrases arose without effort before him. 

Browning, who drank sparingly 9nd smoked not at all, doted uoon rich, soioy sauces 
»nd could make a whole meal of mayonnaise. How much of the latter's smooth unctuous - 
ness can be tmoed into his poems might be consigned for study to the next meetings of 
the Browning Societies. It may be a little more significant that the austere Vilton 
ate a handful of olives in the evening to remind hi/nself of the rich magic of his 
youth in Italy, and that Emily Dickinson threw aside some of her puritanic restraint 



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for homemade caramels. To curb his tendency toward fatness Byron, as long as possible, 
held himself to soda water and biscuits. Some of Schiller's dramas, curiously enough, 
were evoked by the odor of overmellow apples kept purposely on his desk. Vegetarian 
Shelley became lyrically intoxicated while putting butter in a hot baked potato. 
Herbert Soencer, on the other hand, having tried a meatless diet, testified, "I found 
I had to rewrite what I had written during the time I was a vegetarian because it was 
so wanting in vigor*" 

Not a few writers have done their composing in bed. Milton sometimes lay awBke 
all night "striving but unable to make a single line". But when the mood was upon 
him (he was at his best only between autumn and spring) he would create thirty, forty 
lines in a rush and call his daughter to take them down. Likewise Goethe in his youth 
dreamed lyrics and recorded them in the morning. Most of his writing was done before 
noon, preferably on days of high barometric pressure; he rarely studied at night and 
neglected books for direct experience. In the hot summer nights of 1749, Rousseau, 
unable to sleep, put together the orize-winning essay that made an author of him. "I 
meditated in bed with my eyes shut", he relates in his "Confessions", and "turned and 
re-turned my periods in my head with incredible labor." "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" had 
its source in a nightmare from which Stevenson was inopoortunely aroused by his wife* 

Arnold Bennett could write anywhere, even in strange hotels; but he greatly pre- 
ferred the morning, often getting down to work on such a masterpiece as "The Old fives' 
Tale" as early as six o'clock. His afternoons were usually devoted to lighter news- 
paper articles and to exeroise. At the beginning of his career Jack London composed 
steadily day after day, for fifteen hours daily, sometimes forgetting to eat. His 
ancient typewriter was so phlegmatic, he tells us in his autobiographical "John 
Barleyoorn", that it blistered his fingertips and produced rheumatic aches in his back. 
Later, however, he set himself the quota of one thousand words every morning, relying 
towards the olose of his brief skyrocket career upon the added stimulant of whiskey. 
Some writers, on the oontrary, have been able to devote all their waking hours 
to composing or to thinking about their work. Such a one was Mecauley, who wrote every 
morning enough for two pages of print and spent most of the rest of the day, even while 
at the opera, planning and gathering material. His first draft he scribbled at top 
speed, abbreviating wherever possible. Then he polished his manuscriot and finally 
tried it aloud on his family. Saturday evenings it was his habit to dine alone at the 
Star and Garter . At a certain table, after dinner, he would erect great pyramids of 
decanters, tumblers, and wine glasses. His paragraphs he constructed in much the same 
way. Occasionally both paragraphs and pyramids topoled, and he was obliged to pay the 
orioe. 

Josenh Conrad, also, according to his collaborator Ford Madox Ford, was a creator 
of books from sunrise to bedtime. Something of a password on their walks together 
was his query, "Tell, Ford, mon vieux, hovr would you render that field of wheat ?"Both 
of them knew long stretches of "Madame Bovary" by heart and took to chanting them to 
savor the style. His intimate, inarticulate thinking--he once told Tilli?m Henley — 
he did in his mother Polish, his more careful expression in French, and wrote in Eng- 
lish only after comnosing in French and translating. To complete on time a final 
installment for "Blackwood's" he once labored furiously all night. Ford, working 
across the street, heard Conrad run his window uo and shout out, "For heaven's s^ke, 
give me something for 'sale pochard'; it*s been holding me uo an hour." "Confounded 
swilling oigl" yelled his friend into the dark. And the book, rather appropriately, 
was "The End of ' the Tether". 

For the some of the methodical system Anthony Trollope takes the prize. If his 
examole will not move the procrastinating, wishful beginner, a mountain of rhetorics 
will not serve. In twenty years he wrote forty novels by pacing himself. Up at 
5f30 every morning, he spent a half-hour revising the previous day's work and catching 
his stride, then forced himself, witch in hand, to write 250 words every quarter hour. 
At 8t30 a.m., his literary chore performed, he dressed for breakfast and prepared for 












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the dayis work at the post offioe. Prom this before-breakf est lebor he earned e 
third of a million dollars. Even sea-sickness, on a rough voyage from Marseille to 
Alexandria-, failed to keep him from his regimen* In dealing with publishers he 
usually stipulated the number of words in the forthcoming novel, never fell short, 
and rarely exceeded it by muoh. Always ahead of schedule, he avoided printing an 
installment until the whole book was finished, and often had two novels ready for 
print while working on a third. Yet he did not ru3h his work. 'What he wrote most 
rapidly, he was amused to note, was ">ften most highly praised. 

And where ought one to do his writing? Need he brood in an ideal study or 
possess a Gartenhaus such as that to which Goethe retreated? In "The Garret", Dr. 
Johnson, like a pensive elephant at play, went so far as to contend, tongue in cheek, 
that authors do their best in a cheap attic room, away from the dunning landlady and 
the street noises. But each to his own hideout. Some, in fact, have found prison 
walls good enough to stare at — Bunyan, Raleigh, Villon, Wilde, 0. Henry. Eugene 
(VNeill was in a sanitarium when he discovered his urge to drama. Hypersensitive 
Flaubert, Proust, and Carlyle could work only in sound-proof chambers. Conrad wrote 
on the Chippendale desk at whioh Carlyle had slaved over "The French Revolution"; but 
on one oocasion he made last-minute corrections asprowl on the floor of a railway 
carriage rattling into London. Hugo and Hawthorne like to stand up to the job, as on-? 
m«y see by the high desks in the Place des Vosges house and in the tower room of the 
Wnyside. In his Peterborough Cabin Robinson, teetering in a rocker, measured out his 
lines and drooped the pages on tho floor as he finished them. 

And now, having hod a choice of inspirations, of times, and of places, just 
how is one to get the words upon oapor? Hemingway, who rewrote one of his stories 
eleven times, condemns the typewriter as the curse of modorn writing, because it 
solidifies one's sentences before they are reedy to print. Yet Gamaliel Bradford, 
writing to Robert Frost, admitted, "The typewriter makes all the difference in the 
world to me... the cliok of the keys is an aid to inspiration and helps to olarify my 
thoughts". 

Tennyson, who keot in practice by transforming his surroundings into similes, 
composed much of his poetry while walking and mumbling to himself. Onoe the old 
family cook asked, "What is Master Alfred always a praying for?" It was in this man- 
ner, in his eighties, while strolling with his son on the shore, that he created 
"Crossing the Bar," which was written down only after he returned horn* • Of his Tintern 
Abbey poem, Wordsworth wrote » "I began it upon leaving Tintern, and concluded it 
just as I was entering Bristol in the evening, after a ramble of four or five days with 
my sister. Wot a line of it was altered, and not a part of it written down until I 
reached Bristol". Much of "The Ancient Mariner" was likewise "Written" while Coleridg 
was afoot. 

Of the nuthors who have had to resort to dictation Scott is perhaps the most 
striking instance. Laid low by stomach crnmos, he dictated from bed "The Bride of 
Lammermoor", "The Legend of Montrose", and most of "Ivanhoe". During lively dialogue 
he would arise from his torment pnd, with the draperies of his couch about him, 
dramatize the scene, his secretary audibly smacking his lips over the more eloquent 
passages. 

Perhaps after all the most ornctical help to be derived from experienced writers 
is simply this: if the urge to write is sufficiently compelling, it will express it- 
self no matter how, when, or where. And without that impulsion no tricks of theory 
or of practice will avail. 












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Volume IS 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille end Talking Book publications 

September 1946 



Number 8 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and in Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc« 
15 "fest 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



Braille Edition Provided by the U.S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
L~>uisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy A* Goldthwsita 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 v fest 16 Street 
New York 11, N,Y» 



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Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 
Hand-copied Books 

Library Service to College Students 

Gertrude Stein: From "Twentieth Century 
Authors" 

Bertrsnd ^ussell: From "Twentieth Century 
Authors" 

A Correction 

A New Braille Magazine 

Partial List of Books in Grade Three 






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BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, September, 1946 

Book Anne un cements 
Press-made Books 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Government. 

Copies of these government-supplied books are placed in the twenty-seven regional 

libraries whioh serve the blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in the 

January and June numbers of the magazine. 

Readers are required to borrow these books from the library designated by the Library 

of Congress to serve their resoeotive territories. 

Ir the list which follows, the first book notation in every instance should be credited 

tc the Book Review Digest unless another source is given. 

Arnold, S. L., and C. B. Gilbert. Libro tercero de lectura. 2v 1944 APH 
|?rioei $3.50 not including postage (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Barrett, B .M., and B.J.M. McManus. El camino reels Book I. 8v 1942 
Price j $20*00 or $2.50 per volume not including postage. (Not a publication of the 
TT.S. Government) 

Garwood, Darrell. Artist in Iowa; a life of Grant ""food. 3v 1944 APH 
Biograohy of the Iowa artist, Grant Wood, who died in 1942* 

Hamrn, W.A. The American people; supplement, lv 1946 HMP Price » $1.40 not 
including oostage. (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

A supnlement to "The American People," a history of the United States for high school 
students, published in 1939 and put into braille by the APH in 14v # 

Hopper, Millard. How to win at checkers, lv 1946 HMP Pricej 75j^ not includ- 
ing postage. (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Maxwell, William. The folded leaf. 3v 194S HMP 
Story of the friendship of two boys of very different temperament. Lymie was the 
ptudious type; Spud was the perfect extrovert, handsome, athletic. The friendship 
.beg^n in high school when Spud saved Lymie from a bad time in the swimming pool. Aftsr 
'high school came oollege, and the boys were still friends until they fell in love 
with the same girl. With the failure of Lymie^ attempted suicide, they all took a 
more adult attitude toward life. 

Means, Florence. Penny for luck; a story of the Rockies. 3v Grade 1^ APH 
Price i $6.75 not including postage (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Sch^uffler, R. F., editor. Our American hoBdays: Easter; its history, celebra- 
tion, spirit and significance, as related in prose end verse. 3v 1916 Grede l^ APH 
Price t $>6»50 not including postage (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Sohauffler, R.F., editor. Our American holidays; Arbor Dayi its history, ob- 
servance, spirit and significance; with praotiaal selections on tree-olanting 9nd 
conservation, and a nature anthology* 4v Grade ljt 1909 APH Price j $9»00 not 
including postage. (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Shaw, W. F., and S, W. Fay. How to start your own business. 3v 1945 BIA 
Go~>d general information necessary for anyone starting r. small business. Includes 
such things as planning budgets, locations, interiors, necessary equipment, records, 
employees, advertising, and good will. Gives estimates of capital and operating costs 
of various types of small business concerns* 






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Talking Books 
(These books are provided by the U.S. Government unless otherwise noted) 

Cerf, Bennett. Try end stop me. 21r 1944 Read by the author end Alexander 
Soourby AFB 

A collection of anecdotes and stories, mostly humurous. The stories are grouped under 
headings t show oases; back to the Bollywoods ; the literary life; funny business; 
powers of the press; music hath oharms; this, gentlemen, is history; "highlights from 
the world of snorts"; "There's a war going on"; etc. The book is full of wit, humor, 
with a chaser of just the right amount of corn. The timing is perfect, you can catch 
your breath between fast ones. It is completely "in the know." It is good in wartime 
to have a collection of mirth. It is good at any time to have e dooument of hapoy 
social history. This is both. 

Cressy, George B. The basis of Soviet strength. 14r 1945 Read by Walter Gerard 
APF 

"in a volume dealing with the 24 geographic regions of this vast country, an eminent 
geographer presents a multitude of data concerning the Soviet realm. Maintaining the 
factual approach throughout, the basic historical background of the country and peonle 
provides the broader knowledge neoessary before individual geographic units are con- 
sidered. The geologioal base, climatic characteristics, natural vegetation, soils, 
mineral wealth and industrialization are here considered. There follows the more 
detailed account of the many subdivisions of Soviet Europe, Middle Asia and Siberia. 
The final chapter, "Geostrategy end the Future of the Union," contains a discussion 
of the heartland idea as advanced by Mac Kind or and other geopoliticiens , Professor 
Cressey's own beliefs on this mattor and few cogent observations on American-Soviet 
relations." Scientific Book Club Roview. 

Dostoyevsky, Fodor M. The Brothers Keramazov; translated by Constance Garnott. 
3 parts 72r 1879 Read by Alexander Scourby AFB 

A story which was to have been Dostoyevsky's masterpiece but only the first part of 
which was completed at his death. The brothers Karamazov are the three sons of an 
old drunkard and sensualist t Ivan, the materialist, Alyosha, the very human and lov- 
able young mystic, and dissolute, impecunious Mitya, tried and oonvicted for murdering 
his father. A remarkable work, showing at the worst the author's faults of style and 
construction, and at their best his profound understanding of human nature and power 
to deoict Russian character. 

Dulles, F.R. The rond to Teheran. 18r 1944 Read by Norman Rose AFB 
A survey written for the layman, of Russian-American relations from the end of our own 
Revolution to the meeting at Teheran in 1943. More then half the book is devoted to 
the period since 1917. 

Ford, Leslie, pseudonym. The Philadelphia story, llr 1945 Read by George 
Patterson APR Detective story. 

Forsberg, Franklin S. The best from Yank, the army weekly. 2 parts 37r 1945 
Read by James Walton APH 

Written for the men in service by men in servioe and sold only to the Armed Forces, 
"Yank," the army weekly, whioh for four years captured the true feeling and spirit :>f 
Army life. Now, in "The Best from Yank/' the editors offer civilians their first 
glimpse of war as seen and lived by the G.l,»s themselves. Soldiers tell their personal 
combat experiences; describe their daily lives at home and abroadf the strange new 
worlds they face and their reactions to Army life. They gripe about conditions, taka 
cracks at their officers, stand up for their buddies, let off steam as they never let 
1* off in their homes. The war stories they tell, with humor as well as grimness, 
nre the genuine stuff. 

Gardner, Erie Stanley. The case of the half -wakened wife. 15r 1945 Reed by 
Burt B la clave 11 APH 
Detective story. 





















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4. " 

Johnson, H. J. Invitation to health; a guide to successful living. 15r with 
braille supplement in one volume. Read by the author and William Hansen. 
This book consists of 34 short essays on subjects which are taken up in the conven- 
tinal book dealing with healthful living. The treatments of the various subjects ere 
correct. Many common fallacies about diets, blood pressure, end various diseases ere 
pointed out. The author is Medical Director of Life Extension Institute and Examiners, 
Wew York. 

Johnstone, W. C The future of Jaoan. lOr 1945 Read by Burt Blackwell APE 
Analyzing Japan as a "unique nation - a nation with a modern exterior and feudal in- 
terior." Mr. Johnstone first considers its reactions to defeat. He finds it possible 
th<=t the most vigorous lesdershin in any popular revolution against the old Japanese 
ruling groups may come from prisoners of war who have been indoctrinated and trained 
in Free China. In any ovent, the still unpredictable W8y in which Japan takes defeat 
must be an important factor in any United Nations measures for Japan's future. The 
author discusses in detail such points as surrender and occupation, disarmament, de- 
mobilization, reparations and economic controls, and the problem of enforcement. 

Kessing, P.M. Native peonies of the Pacific world. 9r 1945 Read by Living- 
*% st on Gilbert APH 

This handbook is designed primarily to help a visiting soldier or oivilian to understsn 
and make friends with the island peoples of the Pacific area • The islanders differ 
amazingly from place to place in their customs, speech, religion, snd other character- 
istics, and it would take volumes to describe them. This book does, however, give 
some of the basic faots about the peoples whom the visitor may meet, and their prob- 
lems of present and future. It also suggests how to go about getting to know themi 
how to win their confidence and co-operation, and to avoid giving offense by breaking 
their taboos. 

Mori-son, Samuel Eliot. Builders of the Bay colony* 2 parts 28r Read by Reynolds 
Evans AFB 

This book follows the brilliant lectures given before the Lowell Institute on the 
occasion of the approaohing tercentenary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Two chsp- 
ters are devoted to men like John Smith and John White, whose efforts made the colony 
possible. For the others, Mr. Morison has chosen men and women of the first American 
•%j generation, associated prominently with some one of the many aspects of life in early 
Massachusetts. These ere Governor John Winthrop, statesman! Thomas Shophard, pastor? 
Nathaniel Ward, lawgiver and wit? Anne Bradstreet, poet and artist; Robert Child, 
political liberal? Henry Dunster, teaoher and college president? John Eliot, scholar 
and philanthropist? and the younger Winthrop, scientist, statesman, promoter of big 
business, universal genius of New England, 

Pyle, Ernie. Brave men. 2 pts 3 5r 1944 Read by Eugene Karl AFB 
Based on the author's dispatches from the American fronts in Sicily and France, begin- 
ning with the landing in Sicily in June, 1943, m d continuing through the liberation 
of Paris in September, 1944. There is scarcely a doubt that Ernie Pyle is America's 
favorite correspondent of this war, end thrt his name will become associated with it 
- just as Riohard Harding Davis comes to mind in connection with the Spanish-American 
War, and Floyd Gibbons in connection with the last war. Ernie Pyle is desperetely 
scared, and says so in almost painful detail. Ho realizes that most of the soldiers 
are soared^ too. He describes the hideousness of war with a realism which few 
correspondents have achieved. Ernie was doing a job which he hated but felt he had to 
do? and that was exactly how most of the soldiers felt about it. In fact, Ernie is 
the G.I. soldier - with the gift of expression added - the typical doughboy, wired 
for sound. 

Shute, Nevil, pseudonym. Pastoral. I6r 1944 Read by Barry Doig AFB 
Romance of an English bomber pilot and a pretty W.A.A.F. officer. The affair started 
innocently enough when the two discovered a mutual delight in fishing as b pastime. 
Before long Peter was nroposing and Gervase was being demure. But when "R for 
Robert," Peter's plane, was unreported for a time on a mission over Europe, Gervase 















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knew she loved Peter, and when the bomber made a crash landing she was ready with her 
answer. 

Steinbeck, John. Cannery row. lOr 1945 Read by House Jameson AFB 
"Cannery Row" is "a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a hab- 
it, a nostalgia, a dream." Its inhabitants are outcasts of a society, with low 
ta:tes, worse morals, bad habits, and a vocabulary, usually but not in this c^se, 
considered unprintable; and yet their intentions rre good end their hearts kind. 
Their attempts to give "Doc" a party ire human comedy ending in tragedy. 



Find -Copied Books 



This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated these br>o±cb are in Grade lg"c 

Ko 1 " - to locate hond~copi?d bcokd in libraries: Following each title in this list you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of n city. These are abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the library in which you 
k will find the book. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names end addresses of 
each library, and also of publishing houses, io included in every June and January 
issue. 

Biggers, E. D. Seven keys to Bnldpete. 6v Denver, Chicngo 
Detective story. 

Boylston, Helen D. Sue Barton, superintendent of nurses. 3v 1944 NYPL 
Continues the stories of Sue Barton, "Student Nurse" and " Tr isiting Nurse." Vocational 
story for older girls. 

Brenton, Lee. Death takes a hand, lv Denver 
The author is blind. 

Brenton, Lee. "Specialists." lv Denver 
The author is blind. 

Brown, J. E. Your kids and mine. 5v Sacrnmento 

Bunting, J.S. A torch in darkness, lv St. Louis 

Cervantes, S.F. Th^t you may live. 3v St. Louis 

Christmas time for boys and girls, lv Braille Circulating Library, 203 N. 
^ Jefferson Street, Richmond, Virginia. 

Cowan, Mrs. William. Crandall crust, lv Denver 
Short story written by a blind author. 

Criss, F. Mary, Queen of Scots. 4v St. Louis 

De Meyer, John. Benjamin Franklin calls on the president. 
Philadelphia, St. Louis 

Dorrance, ""7ard. ^Vhere the rivers meet. 4v Chicago, LC 

Faulkner, E. H. Plowman *s folly. 4v Sacramento 
The author *s pet thesis is thst the mold-board plow is directly responsible for oracti 
cfllly all the problems in connection with agriculture which we as a nation of individ- 
uals now face. 

Franken, Rose. Claudia. 6v Chicago, Denver 

Gardner, P.E. Review course of fundamental subjects combined with chiropractic 
lews and state board questions and answers. 6v ARC N. Y. Chapter. For address see 
announcement to students is this issue. 

Goetz, D. Neighbors to the south. 3v St. Louis 

Fafen, L. R. Colorado. 8v Denver 
History of Colorado* 

Harrison, N#B. His things of power. 3v Richmond, Va. 

Harrison, N.B. Possessing. 3v Richmond, Vs. 

Harrison, N.B. The way of life and sacredness of speech. 

Heyden, R. R. Erma at Perkins. 4v 1944 NYPL Fiction 

Fecht, Ben. Miracle in the rain, lv Denver 



lv Chicago, LC, 
Fiction 



lv Richmond, Va . 



6. 



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Hereford, R. A. Old man river. 5v St. Louis 
Huegel, F. J. Bone of his bone* 2v Richmond, Vs. 
Johnson, E.A.J. Some origins of modern economic world. 



Zv ARC, F, Y. Chapter 



Kendriok, B.H. The murderer who wanted more, lv St • Louis 
Detective story. 

^eyes, F. P. Written in heaven* 3v St. Louis 
The life on earth of the Little Flower of Lisieux. 

Las swell, M. High tiine. 3v St, Louis 

McClusky, E. M. Block and white. 2v Richmond, Va. 

MoClusky, E. F. His outstretched arm. 3v Richmond, Va. 

FcCraw, Louise Harrison. Not all that glitters. 4v Richmond, Va. 

Feigs, Cornelia. Swift rivers. 4v St. Louis 
Adventure story. 

Filler, Basil. David Livingstone. 3v Richmond, Va • 

Filler, Fax. Daybreak for our oarrier. 3v Sacramento 
Detailed account of life aboard a United States aimlane carrier. 

Furray, Andrew. Service on the trail, lv Richmond, Va. 

An hour with Billie Bray, lv Richmond, Va. 
Secret of adoration, lv Richmond, Va . 
Landmarks and surface markings of the human body. 2v 



Furray, Andrew. 
Furray, Andrew. 
Rawling, I. B. 
Chanter, ARC 

Rinehart, F. R. 
Runbeck, F. L. 



N. Y. 



"K". 8v Denver 
Our Fiss Boo. 3v Philadelphia, Denver 

Spanish language! Castro, Amerioo. Iberoamerica • 4v N.Y. Chapter, ARC 

Spanish languages Crow, John A. Cuentos Hispanicos. 3v N.Y. Chapter, ARC* 

Spanish language: de Del Rio, Amelia A. and Angel, editors. Del solar 
^isosnicos. 2v N.Y. Chapter, ARC 

Struck, L.H. Fagnesiumj a magic mineral, lv Chicago 

Stringer, A, J. A. Fud lark. 6v Denver 
Romance on a wheat ranch in Alberta, Canada. 

Stringer, A. J. A. Prairie wife. 4v Denver, St. Louis 
Pioneer life .in the Canadian Northwest. 

Thompson, Lawrence. The Navy hunts the C.G.R. 3070. 3v Chioago 

Van Ess John. Feet the Arab. 4v 1943 Chioago 
Especially useful for information on the rise of the modern Arab slates and the pert 
they are playing in the awakening of the Near East* 

Vender Grift, Cornelia and E. H. Lansing. Escape from Java* 3v Chicago 

w ey, J. M« C. In a minor key. lv Denver 
The author is blind# 

Weygandt, Cornelius. The heart of New Hampshire j things held dear by folks 
of the old stocks. 4v Chioago 
Early customs of New Hampshire. 

Wilson, Woodrow. Constitutional government in the United States. 3v N.Y. 
Chapter, ARC 



LIBRARY SERVICE TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 

A braille circulating library for high school and college students is part of the 
service for the blind at the New York Chapter of the American Red Cross. The b?oks 
are on a variety of subjeots and may be borrowed by students Anywhere in the United 
States-. Braille catalogues of this library will be mailed upon request. Address - 
Service for the Blind, American Red Cross, 401 Fifth Avenue, New York 16, New York. 



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7. 



GERTRUDE STEIN 



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Gertrude Stein, American 'writer who set a style of literature all her own, died 
on July 28 at the American Hospital in Paris, at the age of 72. There had been no 
reports that Miss Stein was ill, and her death came ns a surprise. 

She was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Daniel and Amelia Stein* 
Per infancy was spent in Vienna and Paris, her childhood and girlhood in Oakland and 
San Francisco. She was a student at Radcliffe College from 1893 to 1897; was a fav- 
orite puoil of William James; *nd specialized in psychology, o fact which has som9 
bearing on her future career. She then studied medicine for four years at John Hopkins 
University. From neither institution did she take a degree; she was interested only 
in her studies »nd was "bored" by formal examinations. In 1903, she went to live in 
P^ris with a younger San Francisco friend, Alice B. Tokles, who has been her companion 
and secretary ever since. Her only return to America was in 1934, when her opera, 
"Four Saints in Three Acts" (music by Virgil Thompson) was produced, and she gave a 
lecture tour. She remained in France even after its defeat by Germany in the Second 
To rid "far. 

As soon as she arrived in Paris, she met the "advanced" group of artists; Picasso, 
Matisse, Pracque. She became immersed in their work and their theories; interest in 
art was general in her family, and her Brother, Leo, became a well-known art critic. 
Possessed of an independent income, she became more or less 8 patron of these men; 
was strongly influenced by them; and in turn passed on the influence to younger 
artists, and above all, to younger writers. Since the writers of that generation have 
now been succeeded by another, Miss Stein may be celled "grandmother to our present 
writing." 

The key of the new" work in both painting and writing was its emphasis on 
abstraction. This came easily to Miss Stein; R. F. Skinner pointed out in 1934 that 
she had published a paper in a psychological journal while she was still at Rndcliffe, 
recording her experiments in spontaneous automatic writing. Her first book, "Three 
Lives," was evidence that she was capable of an intelligible style; the book is almost 
realistic, and is instinct with a tenderness and a subtle, sympathetic humor which 
Miss Stein seldom displayed since — perhaps, because it was a characteristic of her 
conscious, not her unconscious, mind. 

It is unnecessary to describe her usual manner; indeed, it is indescribable. 
In her two "autobiographies," one foisted on Miss Toklas, the other on "everybody," 
this characteristic style is greatly modified; made simple and coherent; and is 
interspersed with "malicious portraits of other celebrities, scrambled philosophical 
observations, comments on history, drunks, dogs, revolutionists, writing, painting, 
genius, the Stein family, and the United States." Sinclair Lewis said the question 
has always beent ws Miss Stein crazy, was she joking, or was she "contributing new 
rhythms to an outworn English style?" His final conclusion was that she was conductin; 
a racket ! Yet her impact on contemporary literature was strong. 

In person. Miss Stein was downright and plain spoken, T. S. Matthews described 
her in 1934, with her close-croDped hair, her "Middle Western" voice, as a "solid 
elderly woman, dressed in no nonsense rough-spun clothes," with "deep blaok eyes that 
make her grave face and its archaic smile come alive." 

Allanah Harper, in "Partisan Review," has suggested the quality of Miss Stein's 
personality in a few words: 

"The first time I went to tea with Gertrude Stein at 27 Rue de Fleurus, I thought 
I had never seen a more magnificent head - she looked like the bust of a Roman Emperor 
and, at the same time, like a Buddhist monk. She seemed to take it for granted th°t 
no one knew anything about painting until he had proved himself in agreement with her. 
It was evident that Gertrude Stein enjoyed lecturing. The l°st time I saw her was in 
London, the summer before the war, at an exhibition of painting. I had my poodle 
with me. *Does he like painting?* she asked me. 'My poodle always recognizes pic- 
tures; he knows a Renoir when he sees one.* This was said so matter of factly that 



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there was no possible answer.' 



Editor's note i 



Among this author's books the following 8re in braillei 
Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas 7v LC 
Paris, France 2v NYPL 



I 



BERTRAND RUSSELL 
From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

Bertrand Russell, English philosopher, mathematician, and sociologist, was born 
at T relleck, Wales. The Russell family is one of the oldest in England. His father, 
Visoount Amberley, predeceased his own father, the famous Lord Russell, the first 
Earl (created by Queen Victoria, in who government he waa twiee prime minister). His 
mother was Fatherine, daughter of Baron Stanley of Alderleyj she too died early* He 
was an orphan at three, and was reared by Lord John Russell's widow. He succeeded to 
the title in 1931, on the death of his older brother, the second Earl; but he muoh 
prefers to be known still simoly as ^ertrand Russell. 

Bertrand Russell's parents were unusual persons, very "advanoed" for their period, 
radical and democratic. In 1868, when they were first married, they visited Amerioa, 
not as tourists, but as students of American institutions. But with their death their 
younger son was brought up in the traditional manner of his class — though he was 
never sent to school, but wss educated at home until he entered Trinity College, 
Cambridge. He was a fellow of Trinity in 1895, and it was there that his genius for 
both mathematics and philosophy, and especially for the former, first became evident. 
His family, however, had destined him for a political career. He was offered a priv- 
ate secretaryship— first step up the political ladder— by John Morley, but he de- 
clined it on the ground that he wished to oontinue his mathematical and philosophical 
studies. However, a third interest was already claiming him — that of sociology. His 
first book was on German Social Democracy, followed by four on mathematics. 

Though his contributions to mathematical theory are too technical for popular 
elucidation, they are very grent. The "Principle Mathemetic," written in collaboration 
with A. N. Whitehead, is a mathematical classic. When it was published, Bertrand 
Russell was lecturer on methematics at Trinity. As he saysi "From the age of eleven, 
when I began the study of Euolid, I had a passionate interest in mathematics, combined 
with a belief that science must be the source of all human progress." He seemed 
destined for a purely academic and scholarly life, when the first World War precip- 
itated him into the politcal and social arena. 

A convinced pacifist, he opposed the war from the start, although he himself 
was by then over military age. (in contrast, he ardently supported the democracies 
in the second World War.) He was dismissed by Trinity College in 1916, and soon after 
was sentenced to four months in prison, which he occupied in writing his "Introduction 
to Mathematical Philosophy." He was now definitely oriented toward sociological, 
ethical, and educational problems. As he has saidl "Throughout the years of the war 
I was endeavoring to write so as to be read by the genoral public. Whon the war was 
over, I found it impossible to return to a purely academic life." 

Instead, he visited Soviet Russia, alienated most of his radioal sympathitrrs by 
disliking it intonsoly and saying so frankly, and then settled down for a year as 
professor of philosophy at the University of Peking. During this year, 1920, he almost 
died of pneumonia, and some enterprising Japanese newspapers announced his death. 
But he survived to read his own obituaries and to return to England, where in 1922 
and 1923 he ran successfully for Parliament on the Labor ticket. With his second 
wife he ran a sohool for young children in Sussex from 1927 to 1932, It was a worli- 
famous school, run on extremely progressive lines. But it absorbed his time and en- 
ergy too greatly, so he gave it up. 



# 



In 1938 Russell came to the University of Chicago as visiting professor of 
philosophy, end the next year held the seme position at the University of California 
at Los Angeles. While he was still there, early in 1940, he was appointed William 
J8mes Lecturer in Philosophy at Harvard end professor of philosophy at the College 
of the Cj.ty of New York.. Immediately a wild uproar of protest erose, based on the 
fact that among Bertran Russell's many published opinions hove been many on sex, and 
that his views on this subject have been exceedingly radical. Any objections from 
Harvard soon died down, but a suit by a taxpayer caused the New York Board of Higher 
Education to rescind the C.C.N.v. appointment. Appeal was denied, and he was also 
denied the right to intervene in the suit. At the same time an abortive attempt 
was made to oust him from the University of California, but was rejected by the 
Apellate Court. The whole C.C.N.Y. matter was dropped in October, 1940, when he was 
offered and accepted a post as lecturer on the history of culture at the Barnes 
Foundation, Marion Pennsylvanic . He went there in January, 1941, has bought a farm 
in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and considers himself in "an ideal situation." His 
son by his first marriage and his son and daughter by his sedond are with him in 
America. 

A thin, wiry short man with (to quote Burton Rescoe) "a hatchet face, furrowed 
cheeks, a Scot's complexion, and a heavy shock of white hair," his most notable feature 
is his l^rge piercing eyes--the eyes of a philosopher. There is nothing either of the 
traditional glacial English lord or of the absent-minded professor 8bout Bertrand 
Russell, who likes to add "malicious footnotes" to his manuscripts and describes him- 
self as "a haopy pessimist." FacCracken called him "a mixture of radicalism and good 
taste, and impeturbable good temper. As lover of freedom and justice, as a master of 
the King's English, as a man with a passion for the truth as he sees it, and as a 
likable individual, there lives not his match." 

Logic, which he prefers to call "Logical Atomism," is the basis of Russell's 
philosonhy. He is a consistent monist and a philosophical materialist, with some 
leaning toward behaviorism and pragmatism. Edmund Wilson oalled him "really a type 
of the eighteenth century philosopher, ironic, elegant, dry, humanitarian, and 
anti-mystic." His philosophical views he carries over into the realm of sociology, 
and it is difficult to define him sociologically except as an advanced individualist. 
Editor^ note i Among this author's books the following are in braille or as Talking 
Books t 

The ABC of Relativity ABFR 
Conquest of Happiness 2v ABFR 
Freedom versus Organization 35r AFB 
Power; a new social analysis 4v NYPL 
Philosophy 6v NYPL 



A CORRECTION 



The Seattle Publio Library, Seattle 4, Washington, was omitted from the list of 

libraries whioh is given in each January end June issue of this magazine for the 

convenience of our readers f The Seattle Library served blind residents of Washington, 
Montana and Alaska. 












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A NEW BRAILLE MAGAZINE 

We have been requested to make the following announcement i "All braille readers 
who are interested in current religious literature are invited to subscribe to ♦The 
Braille Evangel** October of this year is the date of the opening issue. It will 
b Q sent to subscribers without cost. The content of this Dublication may be des- 
cribed as giving an educational and on evangelistic message. The reading materiel 
will be selected from current religious thought and standard souroes that conform to 
the evangelical orders of faith. Write to The Braille Evangel, B ox 6001, Seminary 
Fill Station, Fort Worth 10, Texas." —Editor of "The Braille Evangel" 



PARTIAL LIST OF BOOKS IN GRADE THREE 

(Librarians are asked to check this list and notify the Editor of any additional 
titles - either of press-made or hand-oopied books -which should be included.) 



Balzac, Honore. Four short stories, lv NYPL 

Bible. Old Testament % The third book of Moses colled Leviticus, lv 

Bible. New Testament i St. John, lv 

Bible. New Testament. Sermon on the Mount, lv 

Oorswell, Catherine. Robert Burns, lv NYPL 

Ellsberg, Edward. Men under the sea. 4v NYPL 

Five articles from the "Saturday Evening Post." lv NYPL 

Greenslet, Ferris. Under the bridge; on autobiography. 2v NYPL 

Ingham, Travis. Rendezvous by submarine. 3v NYPL 

Pi-yce-Jones, Alan. Beethoven, lv NYPL 

Revised braille for reading and •■writing grade three, lv 

Rodenberg, L.W. Alohobetical key to revised braille, grade three, lv 

Rodenberg, L.W. Key to grade three braille, lv 

Stevenson, R. L. Will o» the mill* lv 












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JuJUitaJI 



Volume 15 



BRAILLE BOOK KEVIET 
A Guide to Braille end Talking Book Publications 

October, 1946 



9 Number 9 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and in I'imeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc t 
15 Vest 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



X 



Braille Edition Provided by the H, S. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing Fouse for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Luoy A» Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc», 
15 7 7est 16 Street 
New York 11, V, Y* 



y 



Contents 

Book Announcements 

PrcsR-msde Braille Books 
Talking Eooks 
Fend-copied Books 

Bulletin in Regard to National Legislation 
on pehalf of the Blind 

A Confidential 'Vord from the Editor 

Dorothy Harrison Eustis; an Obituary 

Kay Stannard Baker From Twentieth 
Century Authors'* 



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BRAILLK BOOK R«3VIIT7, Ootober, 1946 

Book Announcements 
Press-made Rooks 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are nrovided by the Federal Government. 

Copies of those government -supnliod books ore olaoed In the t '*mty-3evcn regional 

libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libraries appears regularly in the 

January and June numbers of the magazine. 

Readers aro required to borrow these books from the library designated by the Library 

of Congress to serve their respective territories. 

In the list which follows, the first book notation in evory instanoo should be credif 

od to the Book Review Digest unless another source i8 given. 

Asoh, Sholem, One destiny* an eoistlo to the Christians, lv 1945 F*'P 
^2.75 not including postage (Ttot a publication of the U.S. Government) 
^n this "epistle to the Christ ians" a Jewish v/riter reviews the history of anti- 
Semitism from its beginnings to its culmination under acknowledgement of "one destiny" 
for tho inheritors of the Judeo-Christien faith. 

Bible a Concordance to the New and Old Testament, carefully concrod with the 
Authorized Version and containing all the principal common words and proper names in 
alphabetical order, published by the American Bible Sooiety. lOv APH 
(™ot a nubliootion of tho h.S. Government) 

Botkin, B* A. editor. A treasury of American folklore stories, ballads, end tra- 
ditions of tho oeoole; with o foreword by Carl Sandburg. 1941 APH 
Material in this large volume is grouped under the headingst Heroes and boasters; 
boosters and knockers; Jesters; Liars; Polk tales and legends; Songs and rhymes, 
with a number of subheads under each so as to include all kinds and varieties of folk 
tales. 

Bottome, Phyllis. The life line. 4v 1946 
A prim young ^ton master, with a sincere love of all things Austrian is persuaded to 
K undertake to operate as an English runner, under the very noses of the Gestapo. In 
order to oonceol his identity he becomes «n inmate of a mental hosoital, in the 
vicinity of Innsbruck. 7ith a Jesuit priest, an artist and a -"toman doctor as his 
co-workers, f>rk Chalmers do s successful rork, but in the end fells into T >ati hands. 
His broken body is - rescued, but for months his mind will not heal until the woman 
doctor cures him by her understanding rnd love. 

Bowers, Claude G. The young Jefferson 1743-1789. 7v 1945 APH 
The third volume in tho author»s trilogy about Thomas Jefferson, of which the earlier 
volumes wore "Jefferson and Hanilton f tt ond "Jefferson in Power." In this section the 
author concentrates on Jefferson between the years of 1743 and 1789, or from the time 
of his birth to his return from Europe as ambassador, to beoome George 'Vashington*s 
Secretary of State* 

Bromfield, Louis. Pleasant valloy. 3v 1945 CPU 
In this book which is in art n^de up of autobiographical reminiscence, in part ex- 
position of his theories of farming and farm life, a notrd -"merican writer relates 
how after many years spent abroad, ho returned to his native Ohio and there built up 
a new home and a new way of life founded on the old "*ays of tho Dionoer American 
farmer. (Available as a Talking Book) 

DoSauze, 'S.B,, and A, I'. Bureau. Un peu de tout (Second French Reader) 8v 1937 
APTT 

"20.00, not Including postage (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Coot*, Delia, and Varian Fry. The good neighbors, the story of the two Americas. 
2v 1941 WP 
*2.05, not including postage (Wot a publication of the U.S. Government) 



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Gould, John. Farmer takes n wife, lv 1942, 19-15 CFF 
timorous sketches of life on a * T aine fortn as they anoenrod to the farmer's wife, b 
girl who come from Poston originally "out did not want to return, and to the author's 
salty old uncle* 

Hilton, James. So -roll rememborod. 3v 1945 PJt'P 
The story of George Boswell who became mayor of the snail English city nherc he was 
born end' grew up, spans the 20 years between two war Id wars. ".Tien the story onens, 
George is about to loam that his ^ife wants to divorce him; 20 years later he 
learns what that strange woman has done to the career of the nan she married efter 
the divorce, «nd to the son of that marriage. 

Jenkins, Luoy H« In Pis oresencc. Selections of devotional readings and pray- 
ers comniled and taken from her original end large ink nrint editions of the sine 
title, nublished by the John Milton Society, lv 1946 APF 
(Wot a publication of the U.S. Government) 

?*arquend, John P. Repent in hssto. lv 1945 ''IA 
The story of a war marriage that went wrong. The tale is told as it -was gradually 
revealed to war correspondent Briggs, the friend of the young flyor in tho Pacific, 
"Boysie" Boyden. "/hen Briggs visited Foyden's parents and Daisy, the young wife, 
he learned the truth and then it was up to him to go back and tell it all to Poyden. 

*'ordhoff, Charles, and J. «. Pall. The high Barbaroe. 2v 1945 C^P 
A novel virioh is part story, part fantasy. A young navy oilot from Iown is one of 
two survivors when his Cetalina flying boat is brought down in n"id-oceon by the 
Japs. Before his comoanion dies, Alec tells him the story of his life. Then, 
alone in his own lost confused hours. Alec wanders through a maze of dret.ms in 
which he meets his favorite uncle a^d his friend, .fancy, on en island marked "Sxist- 
enoe doubtful 11 on old nans. 

O'Donnell, Mabel, end Alice Carey. Day in and day out. lv 1936 JUT 
'1.00, not including postage. (l!ot a oublication of the U.S. Government) 

f'riestloy, J. B. ^hree men in new suits. 3v 1945 edition ""IB 
Panda #93 

The problem of the returned soldier as it looks in England is the theme. It is 
stated in the terms of three good companions, demobilised together, who oeme home 
dressed in govamment-issua civilian clothes. They find tho situation on the home 

front os badly cut ns their now suits. "Vith the vrrr virtually over, many oeoole 
nro falling book into their old ways of greed, oleosure-seeking, or tho struggle 
for power. Herbert and ^ddie, seeking advice from Alan, arrive just in time to 
prevent his lcoving with Betty. In a long conversation, they agree that they mist 
say goodbye to the post and Join with oth^r men of good will to build a t«T>rld on a 
basis of co-operation rather than competition. 

Soring, Howard. And another thing. 2v 1946 CPF 
Author of w y Son! Vy Sonl" ond other reputable works now oortr^ys his search for 
the ultimate menning of Christ's life and teachings. Ye--rs of mankind* a deepest 
degradation drove him to reflect on onuses of this and other 'vnrs. He concludes 
that all -Tore fought to end strife forever, but ell bring only threats of future 
v/ers. TT ot international pact*, agreements ^nd outla'*lngs, but religion based on 
the teachings of Jesus will end "var. : r. Spring's conclusion is rcachod after con- 
sidering the olnce of religion in individual life, inoluding his own, ond in rela- 
tion to world destiny. 

Stirling, 'i.T. Stirling of the "Thite House « the si:ory of the nan whose Secret 
Service detail guarded five presidents from 'Voodr^v ,'iison to Franklin D. loose^ett, 
as told to Thomas Sugrue. 4v 194 6 CPB 

Tho story of the man from Kentiioky who served as member and Inter here 1 , of the ".bite 
Houso Secret Service detail for 30 years. The five presidents who were in his enro 
,! 'em v ,'ilson, Hording, Coolidga, Hoover and Frnnklin Dp <oosevelt. The book throws 
new light on the personnlitie* of all five, as well as outlir.in t Colonol Stnrling's 
orn biograohy. 






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Talking Books 
(These books are orovidod by the U.S. Government unless otherwise noted) 



' artun, Jacques* Teacher in Amerioa. 2 ots 23r 1945 ^eod by the author 
Eugene O'Neill, Jr. AFB 

A treatise • not on tducation •» but on teaching in America j what is taught end why 
and how; and whet can be done to improve teaching. Refers particularly to teaohing 
in colleges and universities with concents on the teaching of childron and adults* 

Bonsai, Steohen. Unfinished business. 2 ots 28r 1944 Read by Eugene 
O'Neill, Jr. AFB 

The author of this diary of the Paris Poaoe Conference, was a foreign corresoond- 
ent who hod soent many years in Europe and was considered an expert in Tslkan af- 
fairs. In 1915 he became a friend of Colonel House and later it was on the Colonel's 
recommendation that he was chosen "to sit with President 7ilson and Colonel Tlouse 
and interpret for them the proceedings of seoret meetings when no stenogroahic 
notes were keot and no official translations made." (Available in braille) 

Brooks, Van 'Tyck. The flowering of «ew England 1B15-1865. 2 ots 44r 1936 
Read by Reynolds Evens AFB 

This magnificent book gives a complete panorama of the literary scone in Hew England 
during half a century of great artistic achievement. It is more than a history of 
our literature in the customary dry, factual, and critical sense. It is, to quate 
one critic, n a work of ert." Its foundations are fact, but it§ structuro is imagi- 
native and its design of a historical novel rather than a chroniolo or en analysis. 
This is not only a legitimate way of writing history, it is probably the best way 
in which this history of a culture could have been written. 

Caruso, Dorothy. Enrico Caruso. 15r 1945 Road by Ethel Everett AFB 
The wife of Enrico Caruso tells the intimate story of the three brief years of their 
very heooy marriage, with glimpses of his earlier life. She describes his methods 
of keeping fit, his oare of his voice, his many charities, and the character of the 
man as she knew him. Included ere his letters to her, written while he was on tour, 
many ohotograohs and caricatures, and a disoograohy of Caruso *s recordings. 

Tsney, John J. I T inor heresies. 12r 19<5 ^ead by Howard "Vierum, Jr. A^B 
Chanters of reminiscences based on the author's early years in China. Ke "?as born 
in that oountry in 1913, son of the head of a Presbyterian mission, and lived there 
until 1930. In the sketches ho recalls life in China, the ways of missionary folk, 
and just olain life. Some of the articles anpeared first in the Tew Yorker." 

Goudge. Elizabeth. Creen Dolphin Street. 3 pts 4 8r 1944 Rend by John 
Brewster A^u 

Long romantic novel soenod in the Channel Islands and &ew Zealand. Two beautiful, 
but wholly unlike sisters, daughters of an Island aristocrat, fell in love with the 
same man. After he joined the Havy, the sisters waited ten yoprs before Tilliem 
made his decision, and then, through a slio of the oen, he sent for the wrong sister 
to join him in How Zeolard. Tearly 40 years later, when Elllism end his wife re- 
turned to the island, the truth came out, and the three wore reconciled. (Available 
in braille) 

Kaemnffert, "faldemar. Science todny and tomorrow. 19r 1939, 1945 Read by 
T :on Lyon AFB 

The first series of this book appeared six years ago. In this second series the 
science editor of the New York Times has made a careful revision of the first, and 
addod a great deal of fresh material. The topics discussed rar.^e from new advances 
in synthetic ohomistry and electronics, now aspects of the sun and other members of 
the solar systen, explorations into the upper atimsohero and beyond in rooket shins, 
to thoughts on evolution, brein waves and nsyohology. 



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Feesing, F. !% Fetive neoples of the Pacific world. 9r 1944 Read by 
Livingston Gilbert AW 

Dr. Keesing, Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University, has node an intensive 
study of the diverse peoples soottered among the thousands of islands of this great 
area. 'Tor Id "7ar II came as a profound shook to them. Their homes often become 
battlegrounds, their quiet beaches and villages changod almost beyond recognition 
by American bulldozers carving out military bases* This book gives an over-all 
Picture of origin and history, and possible future of the remarkable ne">oLos who aro 
native to the islands of the Pacific, It tells a fascinating story of the tradi- 
tions and cultures that have existed in these islands for many centuries • It will 
help roeders understand what is happening to those peonies who aro suddenly no 
longer remote from the United States. 

Louterbach, Richard E. These aro the Russians. 2 nts 30r 1945 lend by 
William Lozar APR 

The Moscow correspondent for "Time" and rt Life" here records his observations on the 
people of Russia, thoir leaders, and the things which they have accomplished while 
their country iwas nt war. 

Lewis, C, S. The screwtape letters. 7r Read by JoBn Brewster AFB 
As a literery device, the author impersonates o shrewd old devil in Fell who writes 
letters of instruction, encouragement and, finally, bitter rnoroaeh, to a less ex- 
nerioncod imp who is going to and fro upon the earth seeking whom he may devour. 
The hunting seems good at first, whrt with the agonies and moral confusion incident 
to war, but at lost things take a desperate turn for the worse (from his point of 
view) and faith and virtue win. Tho serious purpose is to reveal, by picturing 
them as diabolical dovicos, tho tricks and fallacies by which doubt and temptation 
make their appeal to the unwary so that the tempted may be warned and bo wory. 
(Available in broille) 

T'orquand, John P« The late George Anley, 22r 1937 Read by the author and 
Reynolds Evans A^R 

The suooosej author of this "novel in tho form of a memoir" is one Roratio "Tilling, 
who has beon requested by the s-m of George Aoley to write his father *s biogronhy, 
George Aoley was a member of an old Boston family, resident uoon Beacon Fill for 
many years. The soan of his life ended in 1933 at the age of 66. From family 
notes end letters, supplemented by his own memoirs, Horatio Tilling builds uo the 
picture of an age, a class, a locality, in his story of the life of George Aoley, 
(Available in braille) 

Torquis, Don. Archie and mehitobel. br 1927 Read by Alexander Scourby AF P 
Christopher Forley soys that it was grand to be young about 1916 when Don v arquis 
invented orchy, the cockroach. He v.rites* "Those were the days when thousands of 
oooole were reading the New York Sun every afternoon to see v ?hat nrchy might say 
about this and that. He w^s a whale Brain Trust in himself. The office roach, 
who supposedly leapt uoon tho typewriter keyboard at night uttered not only some of 
the best bolly laughs of our time, but muoh satirical wisdom that was badly needed. 
Here is the whole sago of urchy (and his immortal companion, mehitabel, the oat.) 
It is the wisest collection of American irreverence written in our time; but don't 
ro"d it too soon after on ooeretien»" 

Vitohell, Joseph, I'cSorley's wonderful saloon. 18r 1943 Rend by Fermit 
>T urdock AFB 

Human interest stories about curious characters, some of then from lower Few York, 
others from the author's home state - ^orth Carolina. These sketches were written 
for the "Few Yorker" and have beon rewritten and rovised. 

Orczy, Emmuske, Raroness. Tho scarlet pimpernel. 17r Reod by Barry Doig AFP 
The Scarlet Pimpernel is the loader of a littlo bond of Englishmen who, during the 
Reign of Terror, assist condemned or susnected emigres to escape to England, A 
melodramatic, but picturesque and well told tale. 






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Pee plat ^ Edwin A« Swing low. 20r 1946 Read by Hugh Fellows AFB 
Story of a Negro, TOlly Mack, and his wife. Amy. 'Tilly Mack, country-bred and 
country loving, is persuaded by Amy to move to Atlanta* Though "Tilly finds some 
friends and help there, ultimately he is defeated by prejudice, intolerance and 
Injustice and foroed to return to the country* 

Stone, Irving, Immortal wife. 2 pts 42r 1944 Read by Lauren Gilbert AFB 
This is the dynamic story of Jessie Benton Fremont t one of the most exciting women 
in American history* Jessie was beloved, hated, feared and feted across a continent j 
but her supreme achievement was the marriage she created with John Charles Fremont 
which left its mark on every major event in 19th ceritury Ameriea* The spectacular 
rise and fall of the Fremont fortunes was linked to the historical highlights of 
their era «* westward expansion*; California f s break from Mexico, the Gold Rush, the 
Civil Tar. Fremont won fame as a fearless adventurer; was nominated for President 
by both Republicans and Democrats^ faced two courts martial; amassed and lost a 
huge fortune. And through it ill, Jessie worked with untiring devotion to preserve 
what was dearest to them both - their marriage. (Available in braille) 

Tesoott, Glenway* Apartment in Athens* 17r 1945 Read by Glenway Tescottt AFB 
Wovel based on the occupation of Greece by the Nazis. In it a bullying Nazi officer, 
quartered on a meek middle-class Greek family, encompasses the destruction of the 
husband* Then the stricken wife plans that her young children shall join the under- 
ground movement* (Available in braille) 

Zweig, Stefan. Royal game. 4r 1944 Read by Norman Rose AFB 
Three novelettes, two of which have been previously published in separate volumes i 
"Amok" and "Letter from an Unknown Toman*" The title story is a psychological 
study of an Austrian doctor, a refugee, who had been a Nazi captive. Thile in 
solitary confinement the doctor had learned chess in order to keep his sanity. On 
the boat to South America he played his last game* 



* 



Hand-copied Books 

This is a list of hand-oopied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless 
otherwise indicated these books are in Grade lg* 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries* Following each title in this list 
you will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are abbrevia* 
tions for the names of the libraries for the blind and indicate the library in 
which you will find the book* A key to these abbreviations, giving the names and 
addresses of each library, and also of publishing houses, is inoluded in every June 
and January issue* 

Alcoholics* anonymous* The story of how more then 100 men have recovered from 
alcoholism. 7v Cleveland 

Bacon, Dolores. Operas every child should know. 3v v . Y. Guild 
Binger, Carl. The Doctor's job. 3v 1945 APH (incorrectly listed) 
A highly civilized man - humorous, compassionate, and wise - reveals the greet or- 
ganized world of modern medicine on which your doctor can call for helo in helping 
you* He shows how new knowledge has brought new understanding of the causes of 
many illnesses, and has thus charted new ways of curing them, ^e deals with the 
revolutionary influence th£t psychiatry and psychoanalysis have had and exolains 
the outlines of nsychosomaAio medicine as it relates to such familiar diseases ^s 
asthma, high blood pressure, and stomach ulcar. He makes clear how the bacterio- 
logist and the pathologist co-ODerate with the surgeon toward the success of a 
difficult ooer*tion. He discusses the controversial question of so-called 


















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socialized medicine in terms of your individual health and well-being* Here, 
demonstrated in all its strength, is that subtle, healing quality whioh links a 
good doctor with his patient so that both may work together toward the common 
objective* (Available as a Talking Book) 

Boylan, W. A. Graded drill exorcises in corrective English. 5v 1939 N*Y. 
Guild 

Butterfield, Oliver M. Marriage and sexual harmony, lv Grade 2 1938 N.Y. 
Guild 

Cather, ^Villa* Not under forty. 2v LC, NYPL, Selt Leke City, Sacramento 

Cerf, B., «ompiler. Try and stop me* 6v St. Louis 
A collection of anecdotes, usually humorous. (Available as a Talking 2ook) 

Christie, Agatha. Appointment with death; a Poirot mystery. PhilBdeiohia 

Delgleish, Alice. Gullivar joins the army. 2v Cleveland 
Story of a dog in the war. 

De Angeli, Marguerite. Elin T s Amerioe. lv Chicago 

Edmonds, "W. D. Young Ames goes down the river, lv Salt Lake City 

The Ethel Cotton oourse in conversation, published by the Conversation Insti- 
tute. 6v Grade 2 1935, 1937 N.Y. Guild 

Foster, Harris. Basic formula of fiotion. 3v Chicago 

Garth, David. Thunderbird. 4v St. Louis 

Hamilton, Ann. How to revise your own stories, lv JBL 
Making oneself a writer involves as much discipline as any other art or vocation or 
profession* In the writing art-profession, there are, I think, three aspects of 
this discipline worth considering* The first and probably the most important is 
production discipline, making oneself write whether one feels like it or not. The 
seoond is revision discipline - the main subject of this book - and the third, re- 
jection slip discipline* 

Heidel, Alexander* The Babylonian genesis* 3v JEL 
The excavations whioh, during the last 100 years or more, have been carried on in 
Egypt, Palestine, Babylonia, Assyria, and other lands of the ancient Orient, have 
opened up vistas »f history that -were undreamed of before the archaeOJwrist with his 
spade appeared unon the scene* They have furnished us with a remarkable background 
for the Old Testament; they have shown, with singular clarity, that the story of 
the Hebrew is but an episode in a gigantio drama in which such peonies as the 
Egyptians, Babylonians, and Assyrians olayed the chief roles. They have shown 
that the Old Testament is not an isolated body of literature, but that it has many 
oerallels in the literature of the nations surrounding Israel. "The Babylonian 
Genesis" deals with ©ne grouo of these oarallels and it is concerned with the 
creation stories of Babylonia and the nroblem of their relation each te Old 
Testament literature. 

Johnston, Alva. Fiorello H. LaGuardia* lv N.Y. Guild 

Kantor, MaoKinlay. Haooy land, lv Grade 2 Cleveland 
Crushed by his son's death in the Pacific, Lew Marsh builds uo a new life through 
faith and hope. 

Kelsey, R. ""7. and A. C. Daniels. Handbook of life insurance* lv Philadelphia 

Learn how to crochet, oublished by the Snoel Cotton Comoany. lv Grade 2 
Cleveland 

Learn how to knit, published by the Spool Cotton Company* lv Grade 2 (Hevelond 

Livingston, Sigmund , Must men hate? 5v JBL 
The peopl3 who need this book most will probably not read it* But those disposed 
to receive light uoon a perolexing and serious question can orofit greatly from it. 
It is rioh in historical background and in psychological insight* Mr. Livingston 
believes that anti-Semitism can be traced to the if-nor^nce or misinformation about 



the Jew, prevalent in the Gentile world. 
not inherited but aoquired." 



"Jew-hatred," says Mr. Livingston, "is 





















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McBride, Mary M» America for me. 2v Cleveland 

NcKinney, Ruth. Industrial valley. 9v Cleveland 

IfoWllliamSj Carey. Our Japanese Americans, lv Grade 2 Salt Lake City 

Morris, N» L. The prophesies of Joseph Smith and their fulfillment. 3v 
Grade 2 Salt Lake City 

Menzies, Mrs. Stephen. Travelers guide, lv St. Louis 

Morris, Kathleen. Star-spangles Christmas, lv St. Louis 

Papashvily, Helen. Anything oan happen r 3v St. Louia 

Peple, Edward. Littlest rebel. 3v St t Louis 

p onoins, GonJbron de. Fabloona. 3v Cnicagc\, Salt Lake City 

Price, ""Milliard. Americans on the Farbary coast, lv Cleveland 

Sharp, Margery* Cluny Brown. 5v 1944 Sb» Louis 
Cluny, (short for Clover) Brown was a plumber's niece given to exploring by-paths 
beyond her own station in life. Her poor uncle, nonplussed by Cluny's behavior, 
shipped her off to Devonshire to a service as parlormaid in a great house, where 
her behavior makes entertaining reading. 

Sherriff, R.C. Chedworth. 5v Chicago 

Simeon, Georges. Liberty bar. 3v Cleveland 
Detective story. 

Streeter, Edward. His hard day and hers, lv Grade 2 Cleveland 
Short st pry taken from "led Book." 

Train, Arthur C* Yankee lawyer? the autobiography of Ephraim Tutt. lOv 1943 
N,Y. Guild 

For a good many years short stories have been appearing in American magazi neg re- 
lating to the exploits of one Ephraim Tutt. The autobiography of Ephraim Tutt tells 
the life story of this fictional character including the "true stories" as well as 
some Mr. Train had not up to this time put into print. (Available as a Talking Book) 

Tr avers, P.L. Mary Poppins opens the door. 3v St. Louis 
Mary Poppins is back again at the Banks home and as usual when she appears it be- 
comes a model household. The children fallow her enthralled, and everything is 
slightly touched with magic, until the day when she disappears once more. 

Vaka, Dametra. Delarah. 4v Chicago 

■"Talpole, Hugh. Judith Paris. 9v Salt Lake City, Sacramento, ARC, LC 

Talsh, Maurioe. "ffhile rivers run. 5v Grade 2 Cleveland 
A romance of the Scottish highlands, with plenty of action. 

^entworth, Patricia. The amazing chance* 4v Grade 2 Clevland 
A romantic mystery concerning two physically alike cousins and their love for the 
same girl. 

'Tlhite, S. E. Stampede. 3v Grade 2 Cleveland 
A true picture of the gold rush in California. 

■^hittaker, J. C. 'Ve thought we heard the angels sing. 2v St. L uis 



BULLETINS REGARDING NATIONAL LEGISLATION 
ON BEHALF OF TTE BLIND 

From time to time the American Foundation for the Blind sends out informative 
bulletins regarding national legislation in behalf of the blind. These bulletins 
are sent free of charge to blind people interested in the subject, especially to 
those who would like to co-operate in obtaining the passage of desirable legislation 
If you would like to receive these bulletins, please address apost oard to the 
American Foundation for the Blind, 15 'Test 16 Street, New York 11, New York, asking 
to be placed on its legislative mailing list. 



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A CONFIDENTIAL WORD FROM THE EDITOR 

I want to say confidentially to our braille readers that if there is anything 
amiss in this number of the magazine^ it will be entirely my fault, for I have just 
been told that I am to be awarded the Mi gil Medal this year and I em much too ex- 
cited to prepare copy. So please be lenient with this issue. 



DOROTHY HARRISON EUSTIS 



Mrs. Dorothy Harrison Eustis, founder and former president of The Seeing Eye, 
Inc., the philanthrooic institution that has supplied more than 1,300 guide dogs 
to the blind, died on Sunday, September 8, at her home in New York City, after b 
f brief illness . 

Born in Philadelphia, Mrs. Eustis was e daughter of the late Charles Custis 
Harrison, for many years provost of the University of Pennsylvania, and the late 
Mrs. Ellen Nixon Wain Harrison. She attended the Irwin School in Philodelohia *md 
the Rathgowrie School in England, and, in 1933, received an honorary Master of 
Science degree from the University of Pennsylvania. 

It was in 1921 that Mrs. Eustis founded "Fortunate Fields," a dog-breeding 
experimental establishment at Vevey, Switzerland. There the mental capacity of 
dogs and their working capacity in relation to their service to man were studied. 
At this breeding station, the dogs were developed to patrol the Swiss borders for 
the Customs Service, for the Swiss State Police, and for liaison service in the 
Swiss Army. They were also trcined to find missing persons. 

In 1927, Mrs. Eustis became interested in work which was being done in Europe 
in the instruction of dogs as guides for the blind, and contributed en article on 
the subjeot to the Saturday Evening Post as an enlightenment to her own countrymen. 
As a result of that article, a young American, who was blind, went to Fortunate 
5l Fields to be trained in the use of a guide dog. He was successful in cooing with 
American traffic with the dog, and the experiment proved highly successful. 

After her return to the United States, Mrs* Eustis founded The Seeing Eye 
organization at Morris town. New Jersey, and personally trained many of the dogs 
who became guides to the blind. Most of the dogs used have been Gennan Shepherds. 
They are selected for their dependability, build and intelligence, being taught 
first to obey and then to disobey any oommand that might be dangerous. 

The movement became nationally famous, and more and more dogs were trained. 
Mrs. Eustis continued through the years in her humanitarian work, and in 1936, the 
National Institute of Social Sciences awarded her its gold medal for "distinguished 
service to humanity." She was a member of the Colonial Dames of America, Daughters 
of the American Revolution, Descendants of Signers of the Declaration of Independence 
and the Sooiety of Magna Charta Dames. She wrote for various magazines. 



19 



RAY STANDARD BAKER 



Ray Stannard Baker, noted philosophical essayist who won fame for his bio- 
graphical work on President Woodrow Wilson, died of a heart ailment rt his home in 
Amherst, Massachusetts, on July 12. He had been suffering from a heart condition 
for some time, but had continued to write and was working on another book under hie 
pseudonym of David Grayson. 

He was born in Lansing, Michigan, on April 17, 1870. "When still a child, his 
family moved to the borderline of northern Wisconsin, at a time when Indians still 
scoured the plains. The boy became familiar with the rough life of the pioneer, 
and acquired the rudiments of his education at a backwoods school. At 19, he 
received a B.S. degree from Michigan State College, augmented by an honorary LL.D. 
in 1917. After leaving college in 1889, he took a partial law course and studied 
literature at the University of Michigan. From 1892 to 1897 he was a reporter and 
sub-editor of the Chicago "Record," where he became interested in the life and 
problems of the underdog. In January, 1896, he married Jessie I. Beal; they had 
two sons and two daughters. For relief from the newspaper grind. Baker took soli- 
tary walks in the country, where he made "casual contacts with unvarnished strangers." 
His imaginative writing was done at night, and the oonsequent stories in "Century" 
and the "Youth's Companion" attracted the attention of John S. Phillips, editor of 
"MeClure's Magazine." He wrote to Baker to come to New York; and there Baker re- 
mained from 1898 on, managing the McClure Syndicate, and for six years, serving as 
associate editor of the magazine. For it Baker wrote crusading articles which in- 
vestigated railroad management, the Negro nroblem, and the "Spiritual Unrest." 
MoClure sent him around the world by way of the Trans-Siberian Railway; he was 
halted at Vienna, however, and sent to Constantinople to assist in the rescue of an 
American woman held by bandits. 

In 1906 Baker joined in the purchase of the "American Magazine," and was one 
of its editors until 1915. In 1910 ho made the acquaintance of Woodrow Wilson, then 
governor of New Jersey, which resulted in his later designation by the World War I 
president to be the posthumous editor of his papers. The monumental "Woodrow Wilson ; 
Life and Letters" appeared in eight volumes from 1927 to 1939 and received, as an 
entity, the Pulitzer prize for biography in 1940, less than a month after its edi- 
tor's seventieth birthday. 

Soon after going to the "Amerioan," Baker began his double life as himself and 
8S "David Grayson," keeping the secret of the authorship of "Adventures in Content- 
ment" and subsequent books intact not only from the reading public, but even from 
the illustrator of the books, Thomas Fogarty, for almost a decode. "It is diffi- 
cult to think of any precise precedent for this mixture of essay, philosophy, home- 
ly observation end quiet humor with its essentially American pattern of thought," 
•"vrote Gmnt Overton. Baker himself said, "I have written more than one book ind 
many an article that wps pure toil, but every word ©f the Grayson Books wes written 
for the sheer sense of release and joy which the siting gave me." The secret ©f 
their authorship wns revealed in the "Bookman" in its Mnrch, 1916, issue, efter 
Baker had been amused and annoyed by imnostors who hod claimed to have written the 
books, and who had even lectured under the Grayson name. The essays end sketches 
have been translated into foreign languages. 

Mr. Baker finally made his home at Amherst, Massachusetts, where he w«^s a 
trustee of the Jones Library. He was also a member of the National Institute of 
Arts and Letters, the American Historical Association, Phi Beta Kappa, and the 
Century Club in New York City, 









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JlKJ 



Volume 15 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
A Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

November 1946 



Number 10 



Published Monthly, Except August, in Braille and in Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 West 16 Struct 
New York 11, N.Yr 



I 



Braille Edition provided by the U,S# Government 

Through the Library of Congress 

and 

Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 

1839 Frankfort Avenue 

Louisville 6, Kentucky 



* 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy A« Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, InG» 
15 West 16 Street 
New York 11,N.Y» 






1 



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1 



Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 
Hand-copied Books 

Christmas in Prose and V Q rse: A Reeding List 

Correction 

Br aille Copies of the 1946 Income Tax Return 

Sixth Literary Comnetition: A Reminder 

Ernest Thompson Seton: An Obituary fr"om 
the "New York Times" 

John Steinbeck: From "Twentieth Century 
Authors" 






( 



2. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, November 1946 



Book Announcements 
Press-made Books 

All press-made or Talking Books here noted are provided by the Federal Government. 
Conies of these government-supnlied books are placed in the twenty-seven regional 
libraries which serve the blind. A list of these libreries appears regularly in the 
January and June numbers of the magazines. 

Readers are required to borrow these books from the library designated by the Library 
of Congress to serve their respective territories. 

In the list which follows, the first book notation in every instence should bo credit- 
ed to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given. 
Prices given in the list do not include postage. 

Aocident prevention; home and farm oourses for the blind, published by Chicago 
Chanter, American Red Cros8 and Hedley Correspondence School for the Blind. 2v 1946 
APE #3.00 (Not a oublication of the TT. S. Government) 
£ A poleby, P. H. Big democracy. 3v 1946 APH 
Out of a wealth of experience gained in the Department of .fegrioulture and State and 
in the Budget Bureau, the author presents his reflections upon the proooss of govern- 
ment and administration in modern America. Briefly summarized, his thesis is that 
government in a democraoy, unlike organizations of lesser soope, must be motivated by 
the public interest; that its size is determined by the decision of the body politio 
as to whether a given funotion has or has not acquired sufficient public interest 
character to necessitate its being handled governmentally; that over the years an in- 
crease rather than a decrease in governmental octivity can be anticipated. "It is en 
impressive appeal for more understanding on the part of the American people. As such 
it is a significant contribution. Although deeply analytical and a bit too heavy for 
popular consumption, it deserves reading by every one of the millions in government 
service - it could do much to dispel the sense of frustration that the average civil 
servant feels about his job. It further should be required reeding in the colleges. 
Too few qualified young graduates are today electing public service as their life- 
work - Mr. A ppleby shows that being a 'bureaucrat' is a worthy calling. " New 
■Republic 

Beard, Charles, and Mary. The American spirit; a study of t he ide* of civiliza- 
tion in the United States (Vol.I.V - The Rise of American Civilization) 8v 1942 APH 
•"In the previous volumes of this series the authors dealt mainly, though by no means 
exclusively, with the outward aspects of civilization in the United States, with ex- 
pressions in government, politics, economy, institutions, letters, art and sciences. 
In this volume they emphasize the interior aspects of civilization in the United 
States since 1776. This volume represents an effort to grasp, through an examination 
of the written and spoken word, the intellectual and moral qualities that Americana 
have deemed necessary to civilization in the United States." Pfefnce 

Bible: Search the Scriptures, published by the John Milton Society. Revised 
edition. Pamphlet Grade 1-f- APH 

Bingham, Millicent T. Ancestors' brocades; the literary debut of Emily Dickinson. 
6tj 1945 APH 

A study of the background of the first publication of Emily Diokinson's Doems, written 
by the daughter of the Amherst professor's wife who edited the first three series of 
Emily's poems. She explains eome of the strange circumstances of the poet's life and 
the doings of her erratio family, end explodes some theories which were invented to 
explain these oiroumst ano^ s . she also gives full details of her mother's correspond- 
ence and the difficulties sho encountered in her work of editing. "Though the book 
is painfully evident bs fact, it is as arresting as any fiction. 'Ancestral Brocades' 
and its companion piece, 'Bolts of Melody 1 are a rich and major contribution to our 
understanding of Emily Dickinson's work and her baokground." * T .Y. Times 



6 






3* 



Brilhao, Jean. The road to liberty* 3v Panda J /94 FIB (* T ot a publication of 
the tt,s. Government) 

The escape stories, full of almost incredible adventures, of a group of 186 French 
officers and men from orisoner-of-war camps in Germany. 

Caldwell, Taylor* The wide house. 7v 1945 APH 
Life in upstate l%w York in the 1850' s viewed in the light of the experiences of a 
vixenish red-headed widow, Jane Cauder, and her handsome Irish cousin, Stuart Coleman. 
R&ci&I and religious intolerance play a large role in the book. 

Cheney, Sheldon W. Fen who have walked with God. 5v 1945 APH 
Being the story of mysticism through the ages told in the biographies of representative 
seers and saints with excerpts from their writings and sayings. Contents* The golden 
a£3 end the mystio poet, Lao-Tsej The Buddha - the great light ^nd bliss of Nirvana) 
The ege of reason in Greece; Pythagoras and Plato; The tardy flowering of Greek 
mysticism; Plotinus; Christian mystioism from the Founders to St. Bernard; The medieval 
floxering - Eckhart and the friends of God; Fra Angelico, the saintly painter and tool 
of God; Jacob Boehme, tha shoemaker-illuminate of the Reformation; Brother Lawrence, 
the lay monk who attained unclouded vision; A my3tic in the age of enlightened 
skepticism, William Blake. "The essays are superb and , while not popular inthe com- 
mon, or Will Durant, sense, have been written for readers who have made no special 
*tudy of the subjeot." - New Yorker 

Clark, T* D., and L. Kirkpatrick. Exploring Kentucky workbook. 2v 1942 $3.50 
(Not a publication of the U. S. Government) 

Clark, T.D., and L. Kirkpatrick. Exploring Kentucky. 4v 1939 $7.00 
(Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

de Faan, M.R. The atomio bomb in the light of scripture t published for the 
Braille Circulating Library, Richmond, Va« Pamphlet Grade 1-f APH (Not a publication 
of the U.S. Government) 

"A simple examination of the technical aspects of the atomio bomb and its relation to 
the program ofl scripture - Subtitle." 

Dickinson, Emily. Bolts of melody; new ooems; edited by : 'abel L. Todd and 
J'illioent Todd Pingham. 3v 1945 APH 

The new poems are, of course, patently genuine; many of them ere among the finest Emily 
Dickinson wrote. And the account of hates and jealousies and family feuding which was 
responsible for their suporession, written by the daughter of Dioknson's first editor 
^(Ancestors* Brooades' by Millicent Todd Bingham) is as extraordinary a piece of work 
^of personal background history as any I have read." - Book Week 

Ernst, Morris L« The first freedom. 3v 1946 APH 
It is Mr. Ernst's belief that having taken the trouble to fight a long, hard war to 
protect our press and radio and movies from German and Japanese control, we might 
sensibly go a few steps further and protect them from American control* His book la 
loaded with facts and figures to support this theme, end it is written with the inten- 
sity and the courage of a oitlzen who has had long acquaintance with rules and con- 
ditions of freedom, through battling its restraints. "The First Fregjiom" begins with 
a description of the vanishing market plaoe of thought. It then takes up in turn the 
press, the radio, and the movies* It names names, gives bills of particulars, and ends 
with specific recommendations for correcting the illness - through laws designed to 
make life possible and profitable for small operators. 

Evans, L. B. First lessons in Georgia history. 2v APH s ^7.00 (> T ot a publication 
of the U.S. Government) 

Gardner, Erie S. The case of the half wakened wife. 3v 1945 APH 
Detective story. (Available as a Talking Book) 

Gordon, Caroline. The forest of the south. 3v 1945 APR 
Sixteen short stories, all of them about the South. The first story is about a woman 
captured by the Indians; others are about the Civil War times; and same are about /leo 
T'aury, whose great loves were hunting and fishing. 

Goyne, Richard. The crime philosopher. 4v NIB Panda #97 (Not a publication 
of the U.S. Government) A thrilling detective story on origind lines. 



4. 



Fawkes, Cl-rence. Holiday hopes, lv 1939 WP ^.95 (Not a publication of 
the U.S. Government) 

The poems in this volume cover the observance of most of the holidays. All are 
written from a deeply spiritual n*ure. 

Lewis, Sinclair • Cass Timberlane. 4v 1945 APH 
Cass Timberlane at forty-one was sober, thoughtful, and respected by the Minnesota 
town in which he was a judge. This story of Cass's second marriage to a girl in her 
early twenties is punctuated by stories of the married lives of many of his friends. 
(Available as a Talking Book) 

Pallier, L. F., and Pornet. Linguaphone cours de conversation frencais. lv HKP 
^1.45 (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Parrish, Philip H* Historic Oregon. 3v 1937 APH $5.25 ftTot a publication 
of the U.S. Government) 

Ridgeley, D. C. and S. E. Ekblaw. Influence of geography on our economic life. 
5v 1938, 1943 APH $10.00 (Not a publication of the U. S. Government) 

Ridgeley, D. C. and S. Ekblaw, Influenoe of geography on our economic life: test 
^6 pamphlets 1938 APH $1.20 (Not a publication of t he U. S. Government) 

Ridgeley, D. C. and S. E. Ekblaw. Problems in economic geography: Part I 1938 

$3.00 (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Robson, J.B. Louisiana's natural resources; their use end conservatnn* 2v 1944 

|3.50 (Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Scroggs, "T. 0. The story of Louisl ana; revised edition. 2v 1943 APH 17.00 
(Not a publication of the U.S. Government) 

Swing, Raymond. In the name of sanity, lv 1946 APH 
"A survey of the political aspects and the potentialities of the atomic bomb v/hich, 
for good reasons indeed, the author considers to be something like the Apocalypse. 
He ends with a plea for the nations of the world to give up the right to make war; 
the peril, he says, is now too great." - New Yorker 

Teissman, Rudolph. Small business and venture capital; an economio program. 2v 
1945 APH 

Author who is on the staff of the Securities end Exchange Commission writes of the 
problems of small business, wtfeh special reference to financing. Points out the 
extent to whioh the usual sources for obtaining new capital have been curtailed and 
oonsiders the question of government responsibility. (Available as a Talking Book) 



APH 



APH 



Talking Books 
(^hese books are provided by the U. S. Government unless otherwise noted) 



Davis, William Stearns. Belshazzar; a tale of the fall of Babylon. 20r 1902 
Read by George "Talsh A r H 
A historical story giving a picture of the times. 

Lane, Rose T. Let the hurrioane roar. 6r 1933 Read by George Patterson APH 
A short and graphic story of early days in Dakota in whioh two young people, Caroline 
and Charles, living in a dug~out, meet the stern realities of life • crop failure, 
fierce winter storms, end loneliness of separation - with a steadfastness and gallantry 
that has come to seem typical of pioneer life. As is fitting, the story is told with 
simplicity and is without sentimentality. (Available in braille) 

Lewis, Sinclair. Cass Timberlane. 27r 1945 Read by Kenneth I'eeker APH 
Cass Timberlane at fDrty-one was sober, thoughtful, end respected by the Ninnesojra 
town in whioh he was a judge. This story of Cess's second marriage to a girl in her 
early twenties is punctuated by stories of the married lives of many of his friends. 
(Available in braille) 



5. 



Foulton, F. R., end J. J, Sohif feres, editors. The autobiography of science. 
60r 1945 Read by Peter Frenoh APH 

An anthology of the key passages from the master works of all sciences. The selections 
ere in general arranged in chronological sequence by periods. Occasionally the time 
order has been violated to permit grouping by topics, and some attempt has been made 
to keep the biological sciences and the physical sciences together within periods. 
This book should help stimulate further interest in the history of science not only 
among professional scientists but also among generally well informed people. 

Raper, Howard R. Fan against pain; the epic of anesthesia. 18r 1945 Read by 
Burt Blackwell APH 

History of anesthesia from its earliest beginnings to the stream-lined operations of 
today* The author is an American doctor* 

Shaw, T, F., and E/7. Fay. F w to start your own business. 12r 1945 Resd by 
Salter G erard APH 

Good general information necessary for anyone starting a small business. Includes 
such things as planning budgets, locations, interiors, necessary equipment, records, 
.employees, advertising, and good willg Gives estimates of capital and operating costs 
• of various types of small business concerns. (Available in braille) 

'Teissman, Rudolph. Small business and venture capital. 12-|r 1945 Read by 
Jean Clos APH 

Author, who is on the staff of the Securities and Exchange Commission, writes of the 
problems of small business, with snecial reference to .financing. Points out the 
extent to which the usual sources obtaining new caoital have been curtailed and con- 
eiders the question of government responsibility. (Available in braille) 



Hand-copied Books 

This is a list of hand-copied books recently reported by the libraries. Unless other- 
wise indicated these books are in Grade 1-g. 

How to locate hand-copied books in libraries: Following each title in this list you 
will find either a group of initials or the name of a city. These are abbreviations 
for the names of the libraries for the blind and indioate the library in which you w 
Jk will find the book. A key to these abbreviations, giving the names and addresses of 
each library and also of publishing houses, is included in every June and January 
issue. 

Abrahams, Israel. The book of delight and other papers. 5v JBL 
Contains a number of the author's addresses on subjects such as the following j " A 
Visit to Hebron"; "Medieval Wayfaring"; "George Eliot and Solomon "aimon"; "How 
Milton Pronounced Hebrew;" "The Cambridge Platonists;" etc. 

Bentwich, Forman. Solomon Scheohter. 5v JBL 
This is the biography of a great man, scholar, teacher, author and leader. 

Bigelow, tTeal. Cat-tail magic, lv Philadelphia Fiction 

Bromley, Joseph. Clear the tracks. 4v Chicago 

Busch, 1 xT evin. They dream of home. 5v Chicago 

Buck, Pearl. Dragon seed, lv Chicago 

Case, Josephine Y. ""Written in sand. 3v Chicago 

Chase, Stuart. Goals for America. 2v Grade 2 Cleveland 
A budget of our natural resources. 

Cohen, 0. R. Ultraviolent. lv Grade 2 Philadelphia Mystery 

Corey, Paul. Buy an acre; Amerioa's seoond front. 2v Chicago 
An acre of ground is recommended as a measure of seourity. Practical advice on where 
tend how to buy it and what to do with it when you buy it, is given. 

Corle, Edwin* Land of the talking god; from"Desert country." lv Philedelphia 
History 



6. 



* 



Ewen, David* ^usio comes to America. 5v Chicago 
The author "tells of America's musical pioneers, of opera in America, of how American 
musio fared during the first world war and after, and of America's development into 
the musical center of the world." 

Fineman, Irving. Jacob, 6v JBL 
"Jacob" is one of those unusual novels that deals with only the essentials of any mans 
life and yet is everywhere as fresh in pity with insight as if these things had never 
been written before* 

Flynn, T. T. Death marks time in Trampes. lv Grade 2 Philadelphia Western 

Fox, *T. A. That lawless longhorn trail, lv Philadelphia Western 

Fabrieant, *7* D. Common cold and how to fight it. 2v Chicago 

Gregory, Jackson. Secret valley.. 3v Grade 2 Cleveland 
A frontier tale of murder, gambling and love. 

Gudde, v j. G. Sutter's own story., 3v Cleveland Biography 

Hardy, "T. G. All the trumpets sounded, 8v JBL 
This fict ionized account of the life of Moses, by the author of "Father Abraham," 
brings into sharp focus a Biblical character who lv s never seemed quite real, Egypt, 
vivid, lush, "nd corrupt, makes fascinating background. Moses' e rly life as a prince 
of Egypt, the sceno where he lerrns of his Hebrew parentage, life in the desert, and 
his leadership of his people out of Egypt, all are dramatically and powerfully pre- 
sented. 

Fobman, J. P. David Eder . 4v JBL 
Dr. Eder was a pioneer, not alone in the Few Palestine, but also in the new Freudian 
psychologyo In the foreword of the book, Sigmund Freud says of him: "M.D* Eder was 
one of those men distinguished by a rare combination of absolute love, truth 8nd un- 
daunted courage, together with toleration and a great capacity for love." 

Fostovsky, Egon* The hideout, lv Grade 2 Phildelphia Fiction 

Jackson, Ada. Behold the Jew* lv JBL 
This is a simple and moving poem on the Jewish people by a Gentile Englishwoman* 
She takes her stand firmly on the unity of the human tradition and the brotherhood of 
man, and ple-ds her cause passionately in the name of human justice and mercy. 

Kerr, Sophie* The kiss* lv Grade 2 Philadelphia Fiction 

Fisch, Guido. Two American pioneers of New Haven, lv JBL 
A biographical essay of Sigmund and Leopold Teterman. 

Krawczyk, T'onioa. If the branch blossoms; including poems by various authors* 
lv Philadelphia 

Lamson, D. A. The taming of old man Daley* lv Philadelphia Fiction 

Learsi, R. Selections from books of Jewish humor, lv JBL 
Stories told of the Tise ^n of Chelem and other tales; assembled and retold by R* 
Learsi. A rioh vein of Jewish humor is contained in this collection of the incredible 
deeds and droll sayings of the famous wise men. The stories retain the flavor of 
folklore, and portray a sensitive people who con laugh at their own foibles and mishaps* 

T f aimondes said. Selected and translated by F. TT . Glatzer. 2v JBL 
Maimondes, who lived 1135-1204, was a Jewish rabbi, savant, physioian and one of the 
greatest scholars and philosophers* 

Mason, Herbert* The thirty-eight buried in t he Rio Grnade. lv Philadelphia 
Detective story. 

Palmer, Stuart. The riddle of the twelve amethysts, lv Philadelphia 
Detective story. 

Peaoock, T.S. Honor to you, elder brother, lv Grade 2 Philadelphia Fiction 

Pearson, E. L. America's classic murder; from "Murder at Smutty Nose." lv 
Philadelphia Mystery 

Reynolds, Till* There's a little good in all of 'em* lv Grade 2 Philadelphia 
Detective story 



< 



7, 



Reznikoff, Charles. The Lionhearted. 4v JPL 
Richard I, King of England (1189-1199) was oalled "The Lionhearted" because he courted 
danger, gloried in the feats of strength a^d met the Saracens in the bold adventures 
which made up the third Crusade, Yet it would have been better for his kingdom h^d 
Richard been a weaker knight, but a stronger king. His coronation day wr>8 disturbed 
by a riot against the Jews, and the mild punishment meted out to the rioters encour- 
aged pillage and massacre in other parts of England. Around this historical situation 
Charles Reznikoff built a novel. Its hero is a young Jewish poet, physiciam, returned 
home to England from his studies in southern France. h e promptlv falls in love, but 
his ]o-ve, like therest of his life, is shattered by the brutality let loose against 
Jews of England. These Jews of England, rather than David alone, are the heroes of 
this story. 

Riohards, I. A. The Republic of Plato (in basic English). 3v JBL 
*To book except the Bible hrs had so much influence on us as "The Republic." It is thi 
second most imoortant book in the history of the western world in an English form 
which all may read. It has been shortened to less than half of its normal length with 
out giving up any point in the argument or any turn in the drama which h s made history 
in the past. "The Republic" is the chief souroe of our ideas about ourselves and 
about society. it this time of crisis it is well to go back to this first and be g-fc- 
Statement of the foundations of national strength. Here is a means of studying these 
ideas unencumbered by the minor and sometimes distracting details of Plato's presenta- 
tion. 

Roback, A. A. Physicians in Jewish folklore, lv J*L 
Every oeriod of Jewish history, almost every strand of Jewry, h°s its own folklore. 
Tf edicine in t he Talmud has been a favorite topic, but for the most part the material 
has been exploited as medicine rather than folklore. 

Sale, Richard. Special mission. 2v Philadelphia Fiction 

Smith, Thorne. Yonder 's Henry, lv Philadelphia Fiction 

Spanish language: Cherubini, Giuseppe. Curso pratique de espanol oapa princi- 
piante. 4v Gr de 2 Cleveland Spanish textbook 

Starrett, Vincent. The raven's claw, lv Philadelphia Detective story. 

Steinberg, Jehudah. In those days. 2v JBL 
A translation of a Hebrew tale, dealing with the life of Russi an- Jewish soldiers in the 
timeof Czar Nicholas I. 

Steward, R. M. The surprising asventures of the man in the moon. 2v Philadelphia 
^Fiction 

Stribling, T. S. The mystery of the chief of police, lv Philadelphia Detective 
story 

"'Vebb, J. P. Footprints of death, lv Philadelphia Detective story 

""Tebb, tT ary. Precious bane. 6v 1924 Grade 2 Albany, Chicago, Philadelphia 
A powerful, tragic tale of passion and evil-doing combined with one of the most beau- 
tiful of love stories.. 

'Thite, N. G. The danger lv Philadelphia Fiction 
"Vorden, *?. L. The lovely faker, lv Philadelphia Fiction 



CHRIST"' 1 S F T P^OS^ ATTD VPRSE 
Talking Books 



Away in a monger; Christmas verse selected by Jean Thorburn. 3r 1942 Read by 
Alexander Scourby AFB 

Christmas stories by various authors. 19r Road by Geerge Patterson, George 
^felah, Lelend Brock, Terry Hayes, James Walton and Hugh Sutton APH 

Pickens, Charles. A Christmas carol. 9r (Available in braille) 



8. 



Braille 



Alden, R. M. 'Thy the ohi^es rang. 
Stories that have been popular for story telling. 

Allen, E. E., compiler. A sheaf of Christmas carols. 
Andrews, TT . R. S. Inasmuch, a Christmas story. 
Aftld, ty.M, Christmas traditions 2v HYPL 

Bailey, Temple. The holly hedge and other Christmas stories. 
Bottome, Phyllis. The heart of p ohild. 3v 
A simnle and touching story, out into the nind of a ohild, which concerns the rebirth 
of love and security a^. Christ-v-.s after the end of the First 'Tor Id ^'ar. 
Burke, Thomas. T t e flower of life; s Christmas fable. 2v FYPL 
Christmas legends and stories by various authors. 
Christmas stories by various authors, lv 
Contents: Christmas in Maine by R.P.T. Coffin; Vo room at the inn by Edna Ferber; 
A day of pie sant br3ad by David Grayson; The shepherd who missed the manger by R. K . 
Jones. 

Crothers, S. M. Miss Muffet's Christm-s oarty. T TPL 
^iss Muffet end the Spider give e oarty* 
■0 Crownfield, G ertrude. The feast of Foel; tales of Provence. 

Dickens, Charles. A Christmrs carol in prose; being e ghost story of Christmas. 
2v (Available as a Talking Book) 

Dickens, Charles. Christmas stories. lOv 
Contents: A Christmas cerol; The ohimesj Cricket on the hearth; Battle of life; The 
haunted man; The ghost's bargain. 

Douglas, Lloyd C. Precious jeopardy, a Christmas story. 
T)uT T aurier , Daphne. Haopy Christmas lv 
A Christmas st^ry of modern times. 

Ewing, J. H. G. Christmas crackers* 

Ewing, J. TT . G. Three Christmas trees and the willow man. 
Field, Rachel L. M through the night, a Christmas story. FYPL 
(Tith "The well of the star," by Elizabeth Goudge) 

Goudge, Elizabeth. The sister of the angels. 2v 
This book is complete in itself, but will be appreciated most in relation to "The city 
of bells" whioh is also in braille. 
.4) Goudge, Elizabeth. The well of the star, lv TT YPL 

Herte, Bret. How Sent a Claus came to Simpson T s bar. 
Fawkes, Cl-renoe. Christmas all the year. 
Lagerlof, Selma. The legend of the Christmas rose. 
Lincoln, Joseph C Christmas days. 
Three Christmases in the fifties, sixties, and seventies, with a sea-going Cape Cod 
family. 

Locke, ">, J. Christmas mystery. 
Maoy, John. The true story of Santa Claus. 

Moore, Anne C. Nicholas, a Manhattan Christmas story. 4v TT YPL 
Page, T. N. Christmas peace, 2v 
Page, T. F. Shepherd who watched by night. 
Richmond, Grace L. S. Under the Christmas stars. 

Smith, E.S. and a. I. Fazeltine, compilers. Christmas in legend and story, a 
book for boys and girls. 

Smith, E.S. snd A.I. Fazeltine, compilers. Christmas poems; and The long 
Christmas dinrer, a play by Thornton Wilder. 

Van Dyke, Henry. First Christmas-tree; and The lost word. ^y?L 
Earner, Susan. Christmas stocking. 
biggin, Kate D. Bird's Christmas Carol. 2v 
Similar to Dickens* "Christmos carol" but less fanciful in style. 



biggin, Kate D. Romance of a Christmas card. 
w ilkins, "ary E» Christinas masquerade. 



CORF.3QTX0H 



"A Treasury of American Folklore Stories", edited by P. A« ^otkin, is ir. fifteen 
volumes. In announcing this book in the October issue the number of volumes v.'as 
omi'jted. 



BRAILLE COPIES OF 1946 rWS TAX RETHIW, FORM 1040 



The American Printing House for the Blind is nreparing brail 
of the 1946 Income Tax Return, and the accompanying instruct 
end the instructions, will be embossed on separate pamohlets 
grade 2. The two pamohlets will comprise approximately 100 
The Printing Fouse is issuing the pamphlets as an accommodat 
|P since no arrangements have been made whereby braille copies 
government expense* The or ice of the braille edition - two 
cents oostage included. Every effort will be made to have t 
forms re^dy for distribution by November 15, 1946. 

""Tien order ihg cooies, please send the exact amount of fifty 
money order • Do not send coins through the mails I 



le copies of Form 1040 
ions. The form proper, 
, in interpoint braille, 
pages of braille. 
ion to our blind readers, 
can be furnished free of 
pamphlets - will be fifty 
he Braille Income T8X 

cents in either stamos or 



SIXTT* LITERARY CO^ETITION - A RF ,T P T DFR 

Prospective contestants in the "Jewish Braille Review" Sixth Literary Comoetition are 
reminded that all entries must be in the hands of the editor on or before December 31, 
1946 Please send your manuscripts to: J3R Literary Comoetition, D . 0. Box 36, ? 'orr: 
"err is Feights Station, Few York 53, Hew York. 



ERNEST v T -T'"v n, S0 TT SF^OF 
An obituary from the "Few York Times" 

Ernest Thompson Seton, world-famed author ond authority on Indian lore and wild 
life, died on October 23, at his home in Seton Village, ten miles south of &anta Fe , 
Few J.'exioo. Fis age was eighty-six. 

Still active despite his years, Mr« Seton, only a short time ago, completed his 
forty-second book *nd had msde plans for a 10,000 mile lecture tour. 

Fis best known book probably was "Tild Animals I have known," published in 1898. 
This book attracted the attention of Theodore Roosevelt and the two became great per- 
sonal friends. Rudyard Kipling said the volume led hime to write his "Jungle Tales-" 

Seton followed the call of the wild over prairie trails and backwoods pathways 
to international fame as a naturalist and author. Trained as an artist in London 
schools and the ateliers of Paris, he found that the remote stretches of the Canadian 
northwest afforded him the best chance for expression of his many talents, ^e wrote 
and illustrated more than forty books on subjects relating to woodcraft, scouting, 
wild animals and Indians. T 'any of them became beat sellers. He was an authority on 
Indian lore and his home in Santa Fe contained an extensive Indian collection. 

Editor's Fote: Among this author's books the following are in braille: 

Tild Animals I Have Fnown 
Biography of a Grizzly 
The Gospel of the Red ;, an 
Johnny Bear and Othei Stories 



10. 



J0F r T STEPTBECK 



John Steinbeck, American novelist, was born in Salines, California, the son of 
John Ernst Steinbeck, for many years county treasurer, and of Olive Steinbeck, who 
was a teacher. On his father's side, he is of German descent, on his mother's North- 
ern Irish. Through his Daternal grandmother, he is descended from a Massachusetts 
family dating from the seventeenth century. But in many ways he is peculiarly a 
product of the California interior valleys. T *uch of his work is a reflection of his 
native district, and of the 1T onterey coast, where he lived after his marriage. 

Mer being graduated from the ^alinas High School, TT r. Steinbeck soent four yeors 
at Stanford University, but as a soecial student, and not as a candidate for a degree. 
Fis chief interest there rs in science; and he has a thorough knowledge of biology, 
and especially of marine biology. 

Fe tried his hand at many jobs before coming into his otto as a writer. Fis first 
three books were financial failures, and for a long time he wes very poor. For a short 
while, he was a reporter on a New York paper, but was discharged because he wrote re- 
flections instead of reoorting facts; he h?s been an apprentice hod-carrier, an 
jpaporentice painter, a •working chemist, caretaker of a Lake Tahoe estate, a surveyor 
in the Pig Sur country, and a fruit picker like his own Joads. In 1930, he married 
Carol Penning at Monterey, the scene of his novel, "Tortilla Flat;" they owned a 
launch and spent much of their time sailing and fishing. The fish were a valuable 
addition to their meager budget, for they lived on $25 a month. Later, in more pros- 
perous days, they lived near Los Gatos. The Steinbecks were divorced in 1942; they 
had no ohildren. 

Steinbeok is that "rara avis" among authors - a genuinely shy man who hates 
publicity. Then he was in New York after "Grapes of 'Trath" had won the Pulitzer award 
and had been turned into a prize-winning motion picture, he refused interviews even 
by well-known critics. Fe is a big man, very blond, with deep blue eyes and a deep 
slow, quiet voice. Quite sincerely he says, "I'm not even a finished writer yet." 
In many ways he resembles another Californian, Robinson Jeffers, though Steinbeck's 
reticence and his dislike of cities and their life have little in common with Jeffers' 
proud and despairing seolusion. ^ith Jeffers also he shares, as the l^te T.N. 
.Whipple noted, "a preoccupation witg physical suffering, cruelty, and violence." ^ut 
Phis detachment is pnrely personal, not literary, andhe has a compassionate understand- 
ing of the inartioulate and semi-articulate which warms all his books. 

Fis outstanding characteristic ns a writer is his versatility. He ranges from 
the romantio history of his first novel to the gaiety of "Tortilla Flat;" from the 
psychological analysis of "The Long Valley" to the sociological awareness of "In 
Dubious Battle." Fe has noticeable weaknesses; he is poor in plot and apt to solve a 
problem by some incongrous and mechanical - even melodramatic - contrivance; he has 
been accused of self-consciousness in style, of a "silky, mellifluous manner, some- 
times inappropriate to its subject, of prolonged adolescence and slow coming to 
maturity. "Simplification, so to speak, hfis been the source of his inspiration," 
writes Maxwell Geismar, "assurance has been his metier... Handling complex material 
rather too easily, he has been marked by the popularizing gift... Here is an urbanity 
of psyche bought a little easily..." 

Acclaimed "the twentieth century "Uncle Tom«s Cabin", "Grapes of 'Trath" m^de 
Steinbeck's name end the name of its protagonists, the Joads, household words. The 
book, in Geismar 's concise summary, was "burned and banned, borrowed snd smuggled, but 
above all, bought." Carey ^VTilliams "documented" it in his nonfictional book, 
"Factories in the Field." Another storm was raised by the appearance of "The 1'oon Is 



11. 



Down," a novel laid in an unnamed invaded country (presumably Norway), some reviewers 
contending that it was on unprooitious time to present so mild a portrait of (Nezi) 
invaders. Written (like "Of Mice and Men") in such a form as to be easily adapted to 
the stage, it had only a short Broadway run, though the book itself was a widely dis- 
cussed best seller. 

The Nazis have called Steinbeck a Jew (he h«s no Jewish blood, though he indig- 
nantly resents using a test as criterion of a writer's work); the Associated Farmers 
have called him a Communist. Really he has no theoretical economic creed whatevor . 
It has been said "he subscribes to no- solution so far propounded of sooial and 
economic problems." He is in revolt against Puritanism in all its forms as much as 
he is against the sooial exploitation which so often accompanies itj but "he is not 
without religion. His religion is built on a kind of mysticism whioh is not the less 
impressive because it is as naturalistic as his ethics*" Vincent McHugh has given 
the best "interim report" on Steinbeck as an author to date: "He works things out 
with a technical command that is exceptionally acute and various - patient rather then 
daring, and as yet more effective with scene and texture than it is in the large form." 

Edit or 's Note: Among this author's books the following are in braille or 88 
Talking Books: 



Bombs Away. lOr APH 
Cannery Row. lOr AFB 
Cup of Gold. 2v BIA 



The Grapes of Wrath. 
The Long Valley. 4v 
The Moon is Down. 6r 
The Moon is Down, lv 
Nothing So Monstrous. 
Of Mice and Men. lv 
The Red Pony. 5r AFB 
Tortilla Flat. 2v APH 



5v BIA 

LC, Chicago, Cleveland 

AFB 

BIA 

2r AFB 
BMP 



• 












• 



I 









Volume 15 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW 
>fi Guide to Braille and Talking Book Publications 

December, 1946 



* T umber 11 



Published Monthly, Excent August, in Braille and in Mimeographed Form 

by the 
American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 
15 'Test 16 Street 
Now York 11, N.Y. 



i 



Braille Edition Provided by the tt. s. Government 
Through the Library of Congress 
and 
Printed at the American Printing House for the Blind 
1839 Frankfort Avenue 
Louisville 6, Kentucky 



Address all communications to the editor, Lucy A . Goldthwaite 
American Foundation for the Blind, Ino , 
15 Test 16 Street 
New York 11, N.Y. 



.-.- 



1. 



Contents 

Book Announcements 

Press-made Braille Books 
Talking Books 

List of Free Magazines in Braille or 
in Moon Type 

A French Magazine Resumes Publication 

Straightening Out the Waughs: Aloe- and Evelyn 



I » 



2. 



BRAILLE BOOK REVIEW, December 1946 

Book Announcements 
Press-mode Braille Books 



All press-made books here noted are provided by the Federal Government. Copies of 

these government-supplied books are plooed in the twenty-seven regional libraries 

which serve the blind. A list of those libraries appears regularly in the January 

and June numbers of this magazine. 

Readers are required to borrow these books from the Library designated by the Library 

of Congress to serve their respective territories. 

In this list which follows, the first book notation in every instance should be 

credited to the Book Review Digest unless another source is given. 

Blackford, 1, T. Tar years with Jeb Stuart. 4v 1945 APH 
These memoirs were written 20 or 30 years after the war but when, as the reader will 
disoover, the author T s memory was still keen end oocurete. In this journal the reader 
will find the only contemporary, and complete account of life and work with the 
Confederate engineers* It is also one of the very best contemporary accounts of the 
military career of one of the war's most colorful cavalry leaders, for few men knew 
Stuart as did Blackford. It is a charmingly written and unusually accurate book, and 
one whose importance, within its own field, can scarcely overestimated* 

Book of Common Prayer: Service of Holy Commranion with Collects, Enistles and 
Gosnels for the church year, lv Sent free, limited edition. Address: Forward 
movement of the Episcopal Church, 412 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati,2 Ohio 

Hall, J. Norman. Lost island. 2v BfIB Panda #95 (Not a publication of the 
TT.S. Government) The theme of this story is the ruthless destruction of one of the 
small and ever diminishing number of Paradises on earth, an island in Polynesia, when 
it is caught up in the machinery of war* 

Heyer,- Georgette. Friday's child. 4v 1946 CPH 
when Lord Sheringham stormed out of his mother's presence after his marriage offer 
had been refused by a local beauty, he threatened to marry the first woman he met. 
That happened next makes up the story. It is a relief to find a gay, light-hearted 
historical novel for a change that is so amusing +jo read, insteed of the usual 
solemn, heavy-handed encroach. 

Macdonald, Betty. The egg and I. 3v 1945 APH 
Reminiscences of life in several western mining regions and on a chicken ranch in the 
state of Wsshingfc°n. Her story is extremely funny, and the nicture she paints in 
crisp and good humor of loneliness, endless work and the overrated rigors of the 
simple life is appealing* It is a delightful, cheerfully written story, built out of 
what was obviously not an altogether happy experience. To oity people sitting snug 
and dry, with the glories of a telephone, water that runs out of faucets and lights 
that turn on when you press a button, Mrs. M Q cdonald's life in the woods comes is 
unadulterated fun. 

Manchester, Harland. New world of machines: research, discovery, invention. 
3v 1945 APH Tith release of war inventions, this greatest inventive age since 
develonment of the internal combustion engine, will portend for men's comfort in 
communication, housing, new motors, tools, and processes. Author, from first-he.nd 
interviews with manufacturers and scientists, fascinatingly gives a birds'- eye view , 
tracing inventions and personalities with historic backgrounds. Among the contents 
are radar, electric eye, polarized light, fluorescence, high octane gasoline, Moss 
and the turbosuner charger , gas turbine, TVhittle an J jet propulsion, Sikorsky and 
the helioooter, self-oiling bearings, powdered metal oroducts, synthetic products 
end tungsten carbide cutting tools. (Available as a Talking I:ook) 



Meeker, Arthur. Far away music. 4v 1945 BIA 
Novel of family life in Chicago in the 1850s. There is a strong-minded mother, three 
lady-like daughters, end a father whose search for far away music h8d led him to Sen 
Francisoo, end unsettled any slight tendency toward domesticity he might have had. 

Orwell, George, pseudonym. Dickens, Dali and others; studies in populer culture. 
2v 1946 APH 

A collection of essays by a contemporary English critic, who is the literary editor 
of the London Tribune, Contents: Charles Dickens j Boys' weeklies; Wells, Hitler 
and the world state; the ert of Donald .'cGill; Rudyard Kipling; W.B . Yeats; Benefit 
of clergy; Some notes on Salvador Dalij Arthur Koestler; Raffles and Piss Blendish; 
In defense of P.G. Wodehouse. 

Ruml, Beardsley. Tomorrow's business. 2v 1945 APH 
Challenging is the word for this book. Thoroughly readable, it raises most of the 
basic Droblems of the perplexed end perplexing new worl^fd that confronts us, all in 
very brief compass. Indeed, one wishes he had been less sketchy. Consistently ur- 
bane, reasonable and sophisticated, and ot heart genuinely liberal, he passes over 
Several crucial issues for which this reviewer, for one, would have liked to have more 
precise prescriptions, N. y. Times. 

He is a man who realizes that business must justify itself by works as well as 
faith, who can discuss the question of the union shop without working himself into 8 
lather, who has read and digested Keynes end Hansen, end who can contemplete an un- 
balanced budget with a calm calculated to shock the Wall Street Journal profoundly. 
Nation. 

Mr. Ruml has written a transparent panegyric to management; it is a defense of 
what the latter now possesses 8nd a blueprint of what it wants. Mr. Ruml especially 
shows his hand when he pontificates on the union movement in America. Ruml repeats 
all the hoery and by now discarded cliches about unions in a disturbingly persuasive 
voice. These attitudes, and the loud demands for tax revision favorable to business, 
are surely indicative of the carefully concealed hopes of the business community. 
Its spokesman may very well be charged with a kind of deception that augurs ill for 
postwar America. New Republic. 
^ Taylor, F. S. The fourfold vision. 2v NIB Panda #98 (Not a publication of 
^the U.S. Government) 

This book by a distinguished scientist and a Christian demonstrates that there must 
be a me°.ns of co-existence and co-operation for science and religion if oivilifatLa^ 
is to survive, and exhibits how scientific knowledge, in harmeny with spiritual 
truth* -can be converted into individual wisdom. 

Waugh, Evelyn. Prideshead revisited; the sacred and profane memories of Charles 
Ryder. 4v 1944, 1945 BIA 

A story of England between the first and second World Wars. It is concerned ith e 
a titled Roman Catholic family of wealth* The elder son is * sternly religious; the 
younger, a man of great personal charm, but a dipsomaniac. The daughter marries a 
Canadian who has been divorced, although all her family are onnosed. The narrator 
is Charles Ryder, who at one time had been the lover of Lady Julia. 

Werfel, Franz. Star of the unborn* 7v 1946 HMP 
A fantasy predicting the "shape of things to oome," and a novel in th^ venerable, 
ambiguous genre of Utopian satire which criticizes the present in the light of 
utopia and at the same time ridicules utooie «.n terms of the present. 

Yerby, Frank. The Foxes of Harrow. 6v 1946 BIA 
Romance, historical detail, and a handsome, robust hero, ere combined in this novel 
of Louisiana from 1825 to Civil War days. In it, Stephen Fox rises from poverty to 
great wealth, establishes a vast plantation with a 40-room mansion, and founds a 
family. But in the end, the great house at Harrow is in ruins and Stephen in his 
old age is thinking, "I will have to begin egain." 



4. 



Talking Books 
(These books ere provided by the U.S. Government unless otherwise noted) 

Adams, Samuel Hopkins. Alexander Woolpott; his life and his world. 31 r 1945 
Read by Eugene O'Neill, Jr. AFB 

Detailed biography of Alexander Woollcott, by the Hamilton alumnus who got the young- 
er man his first job with the Hew York "Times." The work is based on personal 
acquaintance and many interviews. It is filled with anecdotes covering the whole of 
Woollcott «s life from 1887 to 1943. 

Bemelmans, Ludwig. The blue Danube. 8r 1945 Read by Kermit Murdock AFB 
Fanciful story about a group of kindly people living on an island in the Danube. 
Since the island was inundated yearly and its inhabitants disappeared during that 
time, and since they had no money whatsoever - only a crop of radishes - the neople 
were of little interest to the Nazis. T>,en one day a beautiful pig floated down the 
Danube, past the hungry diners at an open air cafe, and landed on the island. Then 
the noor people began to have their troubles. 
jP Buchan, John. Grea.nmentle. 18r Re^d by John Brewster. AFB 

Richard Hannay, hero of "Thirty-nine Steps," is the le-ding figure in this novel of 
World War I. The story takes him into. Germany, Turkey and India. John Puchen, first 
Baron Tweedsmuir, was a m8n of broad interests, being not only a writer of novels, 
but also an historian, lawyer, publisher, and finally, Governor-General of Canada. 
(Available in braillt) 

Cether, Wills. Lost lady. 7r 1923 Read by George Patterson APH 
In Mrs. Forrester, the author has portrayed with delicacy and simplicity the moral 
disintegration of a lovable woman. She is interpreted through a boy's eyes, first as 
his ideal of charming womanhood, then, after the shock of his utter disillusionment, 
tenderly cherished in his memory because of the beauty of his boyish ideal. 

DuMaurier, Daphne. Hungry Hill. 32r Read by Carmen Mathews. AFB 
Long seg o of a hundred years, 1820 to 1920, in the lives of two Irish families, the 
Brodericks and the Donovans. The feud between them began becauso Brodsricks were 
thought to have stolen Donovan land. When John Broderick opened the copper mine at 
Hungry Hill, the head of the Donovan clan predicted failure. A t first, success 
^came in the wake of the mine's opening, but throughout the century, the family went 
downhill, and almost always a Donovan was connected with tho steps to ruin. In 1920, 
five generations after the opening of Hungry Hill mine, the old house was burned by 
the members of the I, R. A. 

Fold, Roso C. Sophie Palenczek, Americsn. 7r 1943 Read by Elancho Yurka AF 3 
Short stories about a valiant Czech widow, living in a Connecticut town not far from 
Bridgeport. SoDhie cleaned houses for the more fortunate, but she never lost her 
dignity. She was determined to be en American, and bring up her four children to to 
good Amerioans, and in most resnects she was more loyal than the Americans themselves. 
Shorter versions of most of these stades have appeared in the "New Yorker." 

Fowler, Gene. Goodnight, sweet prince t the life and tins of John Barrymore. 37r 
Read by Alexander Scourby AFB 

A detailed biography of John Barrymore by a newspaper writer whose friendship with 
his subject dated from 1918. Contains considerable material on the actor's family 
background. This is, in fact, ona of the most moving theatrical biography's since 
"ijinsky's diary. Put it is not a sad book. It is a strong book, fluently and 
-L-fnOfthetically written, yet pulling no punches. Fowler's firsthand reporting of 
Barrymore"**"s death has the simplicity of groat writing. (Available in braille) 

Hansen, Alvin H. America's role in the world economy. 12r 1945 Re^d by 
"Eugene O'Neill, Jr. AFB 

The author's thesis is, briefly, that the end of nolitical islationism in Ameriot is 
not enough and that there »#n be no world peace of mind without international economic 
ro-operation. In this book he tells how we might go about it* Now Yorker 



5. 



The urgenoy of a wide understanding of the economic problems with which Profess- 
or Hansen deals, and the olarity and readableness of his presentation, place this 
book high on the required reading list of the informed citizen. It is not bedtime 
reading but the citizen who is concerned with world problems will not find himself 
bogged down in the middle of the book; it will hold his intorest to the end. 

Feystead, Ladd. If the prospect pleases; the "Test the guidebooks never mention. 
13r 1946 Read by William Lazar AFB 

"Mr. Heystead first defines the West as everything "rest of the hundredth meridian 
and then proceeds to examine, with both sympathy and condor, tho cow business, 
agriculture, lumber, oil, and the tourist trade. He sounds notes of optimism, for 
which we are grateful in those days when everything is a problem. We shan't run out 
of timber and our oil won't end in fifteen years, he believes. In mining, he sees 
most clearly the manifestation of the exploitation of the West of which Westerners 
have long complained. He sees that thero is in the future to be no place for cheap 
labor in the minorities to emigrate to, if they emigrate as individuals or families, 
not as communities." Christian Science Monitor 

Hilton, James. So well remembered. 22r 1945 Read by John Brewster AFB 
This story of George Foswell who became mayor of the small English city where he tob 
born and grew up, snans the twenty years between two world wars. When the story 
opens, Geoitge is about to learn that his wife wants to divorce him; twenty years 
later he learns what that strange woman bas done to the career of the man she married 
after the divorce and to the son of that marriage. (Available in braille) 

Hudson, W. B. Far away and long ago; a history of my early life. 22r 1918 
Read by Eric Gillett NIB" 

The romantic childhood of an English naturalist who was brought up on the Argentine 
pampas in the days of the tyrant, Rosas. The grotesque natives, the plant and animal 
life, the picturesque squalor of Buenos Aires in the forties, end the English family 
in the midst of such unusual surroundings are exquisitely pictured. (Available in 
braille) 

Maxwell, William. The folded lead, 16r 1945 Read by Douglass Perkhurst AFB 
Story of the friendship of two boys of very different temperament. Lymis was the 
studious type; Snud was the perfect extravert, handsome, athletic. The friendship 
began in high school when Snud saved Lymie from a bad time in the swimming oool.After 
high school oame college, and the boys were still friends until they fell in love 
with the same girl. With the failure of Lymie's attempted suicide, they a 11 took a 
more adult attitude toward life. (Available in braille) 

Pares, Bernard. Russia. 23r Read by Stephen Jack NIB 
Among interpreters of Russia to the English-speaking world, Sir Bernard P^res holds a 
unique position. He knew Imperial Russia; he knows Soviet Russia, What Sir Bernard 
has done, in what he himself refors to as a pendant to his former studies of Russia, 
is to suggest possible answers to tho questions that may a rise with regard to the 
sentiment of peace. Tbere are brief chapters upon such basic phases of the Soviet 
government's internal oolfcy as "Russia and Communism," "Russia and Religion," *md 
"Settlement of the Multinftional Question," and upon almost every isrue invc: /ing 
Russia's relations with her neighbors and the other great powers. 

Ruml, ^-ardsley. Tomorrow business, 13r Read by Dolmar Nuetfiiuou Afffi 
For descriptive note see entry under Press-made Braille Books. 

Tate, Allen, compiler. Selections from English ooems of the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries and from modern American poetry. 9r Read by Allen Tgte AFB 
Mr. Tate is a distinguished poet in his own right end poetry consultant to the Library 
of Congress. T v ese selections include some of the greatest ooems in the language* In 
Mr. Tate's opinion, the poetry of modern America ha not been surpassed in richness 
by that of any other period. 



Werfel, Franz. The forty days of T Ausa Dagh; translated from the German. 62r 
1934 Read by Alexander Scourby AFB 

Gabriel Fagradian, n rich Armenian who had lived twenty-three years in P^ris and 
married a French wife, returned to his h^me in Syr in in 1915, there to be caught in 
the Turkish campaign of extermination against the Armenirns. The central episode 
of the story is the forty days' of Muse D a gh durim-; which the inhabitants of seven 
villages under the le adershin of Bagra'Uan resisted the Turkish army until rescued 
by the French. (Available in braj 11b) 

White, E. 3. and Katherine S» White. Selections from "A Subtreasury of American 
Humir." 14r 1941 AFP 

T ese selections are in one container, but have been recorded in units which may be 
purchased at the usual price of $1.00 per record. The records include selections 
from Ludwig Bemolmans, William Sproyan, Marc Connelly, Roark Bradford, Clarence D8y, 
James Thurber, Don Marquis, Ogden Nash, Will Cuppy, Ruth McKenney, "Tolcott Gibbs, 
Joseph Mitohell, John McNulty, Leonard Q. and C nr i s topher Kanlan, Frank R. Stockton , 
Lee Strout White and Mark Twain. (Available in Braille) 

LIST OF FREE 1 MAGAZINES IN BRAILLE 

All Slfrory Magazine, with legislative supplement; Edited by Maitland L. Bishoo, 
Fiotion Editor and Dr. Newel Perry, Legislation Editor. Published by the American 
Brotherhood for the ^lind, 257 South Spring St., Los Angeles 12, Calif. Grade 2; 
monthly? oontains fiotion taken from current magazines and legislative matter per- 
taining to the blind -rffch editorial comment. 

American Legion Magazine ; Edited by James F. Barton. Published by the American 
Legion* Embossed by Clovernook Printing House for the Blind, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 
Grade 1-jf; monthly; for blinded veterans* 

Bible Expositor! Edited by D. D. Rees. Published by the Christian Record Be- 
nevolent Association, 3705 South 48 St., Lincoln, Neb. Grade li" and New York point; 
monthly; discussion of Bible topics. 

Braille Book Review; Edited by Lucy A. Goldthwaite. Published by the American 
Foundation for the Blind, 15 West 16 St., New York 11, N. Y. Grade 2; monthly; a 
guide to braille and Talking Book publications. 

Braille Musician* Edited by Leopold Dubov. Published by the Jewish Braille 
Institute of America, 1846 Harrison Ave., New York 53, N. Y. Grade 2; monthly; 
articles of interest to blind musicians r.nd music students. 

Braille Radio News i Edited by Anne M. Costello. Published by Clovernook 
Printing House for the Blind, Mt . Healthy, Ohio. Grade 1^; monthly; radio programs 
end radio news. 

Braille Star Theosophisti Edited by F. A. Peker. Published by Theosonhical 
Book Association for the Blind, 184 South Oxford ^ve., Los ^ngeles 4, Calif. Gre ie 
monthly; material concerning theosophy, comparative religion, ohilosoohy, science 
and art. 

Calendar j Motto calendar, edited by Milton V. Steuffer, 156 Fifth Ave., New 
York 10, W..Y.- Grade lg-; annual; reproduction of a religious calendar compiled and 
printed by a Quaker family of Philadelphia. Sent free to renders of tho John Milton 
Magazine . 

Catholio Digest | Edited by Father Edward F. Jennings. Published by Catholic Di- 
gest, I^c,, 55 East 10 St., St. Paul, Minn. Grade li; monthly; summary of articles 
of general interest. 

Catholic Review for the Blind ; Edited by William S, Dolan. Published by Xavier 
Free Publication Society for the Blind, 136 West 98 St ff New York, *J.Y. Grade LJb 
quarterly; a religious magazine « 

Children's Friend* Edited by D.D. Rees. Published by Christian Record Benevo- 
lent Association, 3705 South 48 St., Lincoln, Neb, Grade lj-f monthly; a magazine foa- 
childron. 









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Shristian Record: Edited by D. D. Rees. Published by Christian Record Benevc* 
lent Association, 3705 South 48 St., Lincoln, Neb. Grade 1-g-; and New York point; 
monthly; religious articles and topics of general interest. 

Christian Record Sabbath School Monthly: Edited by D. D. Rees. Published by 
Christian Record Benevolent Association, 3705 South 48 St., Lincoln, Neb. Grade I2 
and New York point; a religious magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

Church Herald for the Blind: Edited by Rev. '7. J. Loring-Clark. Published by 
National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 281 Fourth Ave., New York, V. Y. 
Grade 1^-; monthly; a religious magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

Discovery: Edited by Margaret T. Apolegarth. Published by John Milton Society, 
156 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, N.Y. Grade 1-g; monthly, Sent. - May; a religious 
juvenile magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

The Evangel: Edited by KathryjT' LaSor. Published by FoDe Printing Co. for the 
Blind, Inc., 300 South Gremps St., Paw Paw, Mich. Grade 2; monthly; religious 
articles, missionary news. 

Forward Day by Day: Edited by The Rev. Gilbert P. Symons, 412 Sycamore St., 
^Cincinnati 2, Ohio. Grade 1-grj bi-monthly; a religious magazine. 

Full Gospel Monthly: Edited by Grace f llen. Published by Full Gospel Publish- 
ing Company for the Blind, 431 Aslaney St., Orlando, Fla. Grade 1-g; monthly; a 
religious magazine with Sunday School lessons. 

Home Teacher: Edited by Rowena Morse. Published by National Braille Press, 50 
Congress St., Boston 9, Mass. Grpde 2; monthly; professional magazine for home teach- 
ers and social workers. 

International Lions Juvenile Braille Monthly; Edited by Marcellus Tagner. Pub- 
lished by International Lions Club. Embossed by Clovernook Printing House for the 
Blind, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. Grade lg; monthly; a magazine for children. 

Jewish Braille Review: Edited by Leopold Dubov. Published by Jewish Braille 
Institute of America, Inc., 1846 Harrison Ave., New York 53, N. Y. Grade 2; month- 
ly; articles of interest to Jewish readers. 

John Milton Magazine: Edited by William V. Stayffer. Published by John Milton 
Society, 156 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. Grade l|r; monthly;a religious magazine 
with Sunday School lessons. 

Junior Evangel: Edited by FathrynLaSor . Published by Hope Printing Co. for the 
Blind, 300 South Gremps St., Paw P=-w, Mich. Grade lg-j monthly during school ye«r; 
Junior Sunday School lessons, Christian stories, pooms, etc. 

The Lamp: Edited by Florence Clapsaddle. Published by Christian association 
for the Blind, 430 East 141 St., New York 54, N. Y. Grade 1^; bi-monthly; a religious 
magazine • 

Lighthouse Gleams: Edited by Daisy F. Rogers. Published by New York Association 
for the Blind* 111 East 59St., New York, N. Y. Grade 1^; 5 times a year; news of the 
activities of the Lighthouse. 

Lutheran Messenger for the Blind: Edited by Rev. O.C. Schroeder, 1648 East 85 
St., Chicago, 111. Published by Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod. Grade 1^-; monthly 
except August; a religious magazine. 

Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind: Edited by H.F. Liechty. Published by 
Matilda Ziegler Publishing Company for the Blind, Monsoy, ^ T .Y. Grade ljg-, with 
additional contractions. Now York point and Moon; monthly; a general magazine with 
special features for the blind. 

Messenger to the Sightless: Edited by Albert W. Talmadge and Sadie Pattan. 
Published by the Society for the Aid of the Sightless, 345 East Fourth North' St., 
Prove, Utah. Grade 1^; monthly; a religious magazine. 

Minnesotan: Edited by Marie Kohler. Published by Minnesota State Council of 
Agencies f or t he Blind, 2835 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. Grade 2; monthly; 
matters of interest to the blind of Minnesota. 




9. 



Our Special: Edited by Florence W« Birchard. Published by National Braille 
Press, 50 Congress St., Boston 9, Mass, Grade ^j monthly; articles on homo occupa- 
tions, etc., intended especially for women* 

The Searchlight: Edited by Helen Day. Published by the New York Association 
for the Blind, 111 East 59th St., New York, N. Y. Grade 1^-j ten times a year; a 
juvenile magazine. 

The Seer: Edited by Philip N. Harrison. Published by Pennsylvania Association 
for the Blind, 400 * T orth 3 St., Harrisburg, Pc . Grade 1-g and inkprint; quarterly; 
official organ for the Association. 

Unity Daily Word: Published by Unity School of Christianity, 917 Tracy A ve., 
Kansas City, Mo, Grpde lg; monthly; a religious magazine. 

Uooer Room: Edited by Grover C. Emmons. Published by Methodist Church, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. Grade 1-g-j quarterly; daily devotions. 

We the Blind: ^dited by M. David Treatman. Published by Pennsylvania Federation 
of the Blind, 136 So. 46 St., Philadelphia, Pa. Grade 2 and inkprint ; quarterly; 
current topics of interest to the blind. 

Wee Wisdom: Edited by Jane Palmer. Published by Unity School of Christianity, 
917 Tracy Ave., Kansas City, Mo. Grade lg-; monthly; a magazine for ohildren. 

Weekly News: Edited by Francis B. lerardi. Published by Notional Braille Press, 
Inc., 50 Congress St., Boston 9, Mass. Grade 2; weekly; current news. 



FREE MAGAZINES IN MOON 

Lutheran ^rald for the Blind: Edited by Rev. O.C. Schroeder. Published by 
Lutheran Churoh, Missouri Synod, 1648 East 85 St., Chicago, 111. Moon; quarterly; 
a religious magazine. 

Matilda Ziegler Magazino for the Blind: Edited by F.M. Liechty. Published by 
Matilda Ziegler Publishing Co., Monsey, N. Y. Moon type, braille and New York ooint; 
monthly; a general magazine with soecial features for the blind. 



A FRENCH MAGAZINE IN BRAILLE RESUMES PUBLICATION 
From "The New Beacon" 

Readers of French braille throughout the world - as well as the many -well-wishers 
of the American Foundation for Overseas Blind (formerly the American Braille Press) - 
were rejoiced at the appearance in Septmober of this year of the fi^st postwar issue 
of the Foundation's French magazine "And There Was Light." This periodical, which is 
to appear each month as in prewar days, is available to the blind at the nominal 
annual subscription of fifty U.S, cents and can be obtained from the Foundation at 
4 Rue de Fontovideo, Paris. 

In an editorial, M, Georges L. Raverat, European director of the Foundation, re- 
fers to the faot that the former American Braille Press has now become the American 
Foundation for Overseas Blind and that it has been affiliated with the American 
Foundation for the Blind in New York with which, he says, it now forms a solid and 
powerful "bloc," with a vast program for the future which is already in partial pro- 
cess of realization despite the inherent difficulties of the present time. 






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STRAIGHTENING OUT THE TAUGHS 

ALEC TftUGH 

From "Twentieth Century Authors" 

Aleo Taugh, English novelist, was horn at Hemosteed, son of the editor and 
publisher, Arthur Taugh, and elder hrother of Evelyn Taugh. He was educated at 
Sherhourne School, where he edited the school magazine and wrote the prize poem, and 
at Sandhurst, the Royal Military College, He was gazetted as record lieutenant to 
the Dorset Regiment in 1917, and was a prisoner of war from 1918 to the end of the 
war. He was by this time the author of s novel of school life, "The Loom of Youth/ 1 
which caused a sensation, and of a book of youthful poems. He hrs been a world-wide 
traveller and since his school days an athlate, still being an active cricketer and 
golfer. His brother, Evelyn Taugh, says, "You may meet him anywhere at any time and 
in any sort of oompany - always 'just going.'" In 1932 he married Joan Chirnside, 
an Australian, and they hove two sons and a daughter* In 1940 he returned to active 
service in the army, 

/ He is a short, sturdy man, bald, with a quizzical expression. "For the duration" 
(of the Hitler war) he said he 1v as a soldier, "with no spare time to write anything , " 
but his books continued to be published. Several of his books are based on his 
travels; he has been frequently to the United States and has made several lecture 
tours • 



Editors Votet "The Balliols," a novel, 4v APH, 
in braille. The last in Indianapolis and Sacramento. 



and "Hot Countries," 4v, are 



EVELYN TMTGE 



Evelyn Taugh, English novelist, satirist, biographer, and writer of travel books, 
was born in London, the seoond son of Arthur Tough, a literary critic. His brother, 
A leo, is also a well-known novelist* Heattended Lancing School, his brother's novel 
"The Loom of Youth? having made it impossible for him to follow Alec Taugh at 
Sherbourne School* 

The latter school^ in fact, had removed Tough's name from its old boys' list in 
reprisal for his animadversions on its management in his novel* Evelyn Taugh edited 
the school paper, won a prize for English verse, organized the Dilettantes' Society, 
and persuaded a master to act in his throe act play, "Conversion," which satirized 
the school asseen by maiden aunts, by novelists like his brother, and "as we ell 
know it really is." After leaving Oxford he snent a year in London attending art 
sohool, and wrote a critical biography of Dante Gabriel Rossetti which combined brill- 
iance with sobriety. Tith varying degrees of apolication he taught school, worked en 
the "Daily Express," and took up the study of "carpentry and of fashionable society." 
M a personal friend of the wealthy Guinness family (his novel "Vile Bodies" is ded- 
icated to Bryan and Diana Guinness) he had full opportunity for firsthand observations 
of the conduct of the Bright Young People of the day, their treasure hunts, motor 
races, and casual amours. The fate of Miss Agatha Runcible in "Vile Bodies" curiously 
foreshadowed the return to England from Nazi Germany of Hitler's friend Q nd 9^nirer, 
Unity Valkyrie Freeman-Mitford, sister of Diana Guinness, with a bullet lodged in her 
head. 

Taugh's novels, which are "hectic pieces of savage satire," are an odd contrast 
to such serious studies as the Rosetti book and the "Edmtnd Campion" of 1935, a bock 
about the Elizabethan martyr and Recusant poet which won the Hawthornden Prize In 1936. 

Evelyn Taugh once listed his chief aversions as love, conversation, the stage, 
writing, and Tales, (His recreations are eating, drinking, drawing, and travelling.) 
Only the Telsh aversion, as tellingly exnressed in "Decline end Fall," seems to 
have been insuperable. 



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In 1928 "TTaugh married the Honorable Evelyn Gardner, daughter of Lord Burghclere. 
They were divorced in 1930, the same year he was received into the ^otholic Church, 
In 1937 he married Laura Herbert, youngest daughter of the lpte Colonel Hon# Aubrey 
Herbert, MP« They have a daughter, and live at Piers Court, Stinchcombe, Gloucester- 
shire. His clubs are the St. James and Buok's* Though his novels are filled with 
hilariously amusing as well as mordantly ironic situations, Taugh's travel books ere 
rather grim and purposeful in tone. The Abyssinian books are the work of an exper- 
ienced and capable reporter? the later "Mexico" is told from a conservative, Catho- 
lic point of view. (Catholicism has become one of his major interests.) "Scoop" 
is a blistering satire on Forthcliff ian journalism and modern radio broadcrsting. 
The writer is blond, immaculately dressed, and his mien in photographs is aporooriete- 
ly bored and sophisticated. 

Evelyn Waugh joined the British marines shortly after the outbreak of the 
second world war in 1939j he was among the first to volunteer for Commando work. 



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